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Well I recently bought a VIZIO 26" Razor LED-LCD HDTV M260VA and needed help or suggestions on calibrating my tv. Any help is appreciated, I will try your custom set ups as of right now anything is better than the default settings. Also i would like to know if the game option is a good choice for gaming or do I need to calibrate it different. Thanks
 

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Pick up a calibration disc such as Disney's WOW, DVE's HD Basics, or the free AVSAVC download you can find here, and use it to develop your own settings. They'll be a better fit for your own TV than someone else's settings. If you have questions about what you're seeing with the disk, please come back here and ask. If all you want is someone else's settings, please go to the area for your display type and search for a users or calibration thread for your particular model. The info should be there.
 

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None of the factory settings are much good for much of anything when it comes to the appearance of the images. You may need different control settings for each mode you select and smaller TVs may not save different settings for different modes (that's easy to check... move some control from it's default setting while you are in "Standard" mode or something like that, then switch to Vivid, Game, Movie, etc. mode one at a time and look at the control you moved and see if it is back at the default setting or at the new setting you used. If it is still set to the default setting, that mode has a different memory than the other modes and you can customize different modes for different purposes. Game mode isn't likely to be particularly good for how images LOOK, but it possibly bypasses internal video processing so what you see on screen is not delayed... this delay annoys gamers playing games that require precision timing or high reaction speeds... things common in first-person-shooters, driving/racing games, fantasy combat, etc. So you may need Game mode if you notice that the picture on the TV lags the action noticeably, but Game mode is unlikely to make games LOOK any better since factories don't do much to make video look good (unless the TV is THX certified, in which case the THX mode is usually the most accurate mode).


The other thing you have to understand is that video is not a personal preference thing. There are very specific parameters... STANDARDS. When you deviate from those standards, images get increasingly inaccurate. The only way to know if you are remotely close to any of the video standards is to have the TV measured, then calibrated to remove the inaccuracies. However, calibration controls tend to be very limited on smaller screen-size displays... some have no useful calibration controls at all. Setting color, tint, contrast, brightness... that's not REALLY calibration but it certainly helps to get them right. As pointed out in the other post, you really need a test/setup disc to get some of those controls set reasonably close, though the setup disc is only going to get your Brightness and Sharpness controls set accurately. The other controls... Contrast in particular... you don't know if what you are looking at is 20 foot-Lamberts, 35 fL, or 65 fL... you have to have a meter to set the Contrast control correctly, but the test setup discs can tell you what your display does as you raise and lower the Contrast control. What we calibrators consider calibration uses OTHER controls (we check the common controls of course, but "real" calibration goes way beyond those basic controls). And those OTHER controls are really useless without a complete set of calibration tools... a good meter, calibration software that helps interpret the meter readings, and a source of test patterns (a disc or a dedicated video signal generator).


You probably want to start looking at the AVS thread called "Calibration For Dummies" - it's a good place to start for someone new to the whole concept of calibration. You can get into just the parts that apply to the available controls on your TV or you can get into the whole thing and learn about grayscale, gamma, and CMS.
 
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