AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are in the planning stages of building a house in about a year. My wife has given me free reign of the 3000 sq feet basement for a theater. I plan on two rows of 4-5 recliners.


1. Can a theater ever be too big?

2. Are there any "ideal dimensions" acoustically speaking?

3. My Sketchup dimensions are based on 16:9, but was thinking of 2.39:1 since I have enough room but are there any hidden dangers?


Thanks for your thoughts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
1: A theater needs to be big enough to seat all potential guests. Do you really know that many people you would feel comfortable having around at the same time?

2: I'm not well versed in this subject

3: Anamorphic screens are pretty much the standard for large(er) home theaters. Hidden dangers are minimal, pains in the rear amount to source video that is not anamorphic. I'm sure someone who has experience with anamorphic setups can chime in here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
Will your room be used mostly for movies, gaming?


A room that large and being able to throw an image that big is not going to be cheap by any means. If you want to seat 8-10 people with two rows I say your room is too big.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,710 Posts
That's a very nicely sized room. Your proposed screen is rather small for the space. The down sides will be the cost of the equipment (speakers, amps, projector) required for such a space. Ceiling could be higher but still, lots of flexibility and options.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The room will be used exclusively for movies.


The concrete walls in the basement will be 9.5 feet tall.


The 16:9 diagonal screen size shown is 215" which looks small in the picture to me also which is the reason that I was thinking of going with 2.35:1 screen which would increase my screen width to 205" instead of the 143" shown. I would be doing this really just to eat up the empty wall (and after all, bigger must be better).


My worries are:

1. stretching the picture this much will make the picture too dark with a projector like the Panasonic PT-AE4000U.

2. The space will look empty once furniture is placed.


I had not thought of the amount of power that it would take to appropriately fill the room with sound.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,710 Posts
The AE4000U would not be the best choice (for any number of reasons). As well, if you're selecting that projector simply due to budgetary constraints, you would be well advised to pick a less ambitious project (or room size).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
I dont think the room is too big. AND who cares about empty space? It would look cleaner and better in my opinion.


You might have to get a little beefier system to fill the room and if you want a really good quality picture you might have to get a little better projector.


BUT those things might be more "opinion" rather than "facts" Good luck and I look forward to seeing this thread to the end.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,710 Posts
Technical requirements based upon seating locations, room size, etc., are facts, not opinions. What you meet those technical requirements with can degrade into opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Your room would be about the same cubic feet as mine, I just have a higher ceiling.


I am not sure why one of the earlier responses indicated that the panasonic 4000 wouldn't be a good choice for you? As long as your lighting is controlled it will give you a phenomenal picture without much picture degradation. Is it the best picture money can buy? Probably not but most people couldn't see the difference in a side by side comparison, I promise you will still be stunned at the the picture quality if you have never seen a decent 1080P projector image. I have an Epson 8100 HD projector and am throwing a 125" 16:9 image onto a DIY screen in a (currently) white room with and the picture quality is astounding.

IMO the only problem with the proposed setup is that you will end up sitting in the middle of the room and from what I understand sound quality is generally not great in the center of a room. That being said, with an adequate amount of sound and proper calibration and room treatment I am sure it would be more than acceptable. I am sure you know that it will require quite a bit if Subwoofer. If you haven't already done so you may want to take a look at the DIY subwoofer section and think about incorporating a couple of THTs or DTS-10s into your room. You will have plenty of space for them and, especially with THTs, you would save thousands of dollars over what you would spend to get a similar bass response with commercially available options. If it was my project I would DIY all of the speakers for the room.

If I was building a dedicated theater into a room like that I would go with a couple of rows of seats and consider either building a partition wall behind the back row or adding an elevated bar/casual viewing area with another screen or tow of some sort back there for events such as superbowl ect. You would have enough room to place some other cocktail type seating around the room as well and this secondary screen would increase viewing options and create a fun and casual atmosphere.


Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by captainkidd /forum/post/18254409


Your room would be about the same cubic feet as mine, I just have a higher ceiling.


I am not sure why one of the earlier responses indicated that the panasonic 4000 wouldn't be a good choice for you?


Good luck!

Ummm, maybe because Dennis does this for a living



Dennis isn't shy and will likely expand on his point, but I took his comments to mean that the Panny is a terrific "budget" projector (I have the 3000 myself and love it--but in a much smaller space), but for a room that size there are a lot of limits on what it can do--and a HT project of that room size would usually suggest that budget is less of a concern--to me at least.


Personally, if I had a room that big, I'd be considering whether I could get two really great rooms out of it--one for HT and one for whatever else you might like to have.


Good luck--what a wonderful problem (too much space) to have
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
If it were my basement, I'd turn the theater 90 degrees to how you have it now. Enter from the side between the stage and the front row. I think you could still seat 8-10 people easily, and you'd knock down the volume to fill by quite a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,204 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dixon /forum/post/18254566


Ummm, maybe because Dennis does this for a living



Dennis isn't shy and will likely expand on his point, but I took his comments to mean that the Panny is a terrific "budget" projector (I have the 3000 myself and love it--but in a much smaller space), but for a room that size there are a lot of limits on what it can do--and a HT project of that room size would usually suggest that budget is less of a concern--to me at least.

The answer is pretty simple - the projector doesn't have the lumens to light a really large screen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dixon /forum/post/18254566


Ummm, maybe because Dennis does this for a living

I can appreciate that and I am sure that Dennis is a qualified and knowledgeable professional in the field. There are always better options if you have the money and are willing to spend it but IMO there is no real reason that the Panny would not work great. The specs advertise it as good to 200" so 215" would not be a big deal.

Not everybody wants or needs the absolute finest (read most $$$) of every component to build a high quality and thoroughly enjoyable home theater. I don't agree with his statement about taking on a less ambitious project just because the OP indicated that he might choose the Panny for his projector. It sounds as if saying that he can't afford to do it "right".

There are many advantages to a larger theater room even if you sacrifice a bit of sound or picture quality. Build it, it will be sweet



I don't know why you (previous post) would say that the Panny doesn't have enough lumens to light a 215" screen? What do you think would happen if you aimed it at a 215" screen in a room with good light control? I would venture to guess that you would get a stunning HD picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,326 Posts
I'll 2nd that the AE4000u would not have enough light output for me on such a large screen unless you reall went ultra high gain with it, and ultra high gain screens don't lend themselves to really large rooms in my opinion either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
726 Posts
I have a similar situation I am looking at... Not this projector and not as big of a screen, but similar dilemma. Basically, the amount of light required is measured in fl. Most standards or expert opinion suggests that the fl needs to be at least 16fl. The Cinema 1 mode for the Panny puts out 548 lumens. The number of lumens required to light up a 215" diagonal screen to a 16fl level is right at 2,200 lumens... At 548 lumens, the number of fl at the screen would be in the neighborhood of 4.2 fl, which is quite low.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,710 Posts
Captain - part of the issue is you believe the specifications. The second issue (other than light output) is you're creating a really big picture and with a really big picture all the reasons the Panny can sold as a budget projector will be right there in front of your face.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
726 Posts
Here is a good reference I found for calculating this... Although their recommendation for desired fl is a bit lower than some I've read:


Foot Lamberts

Foot lamberts relates to how bright the screen actually is. The ideal measurement is 11 fL with 10-11 fL good. For reference a direct view TV measures between 25-35 fL. You can get a good idea of the foot lamberts of a projector/screen combo using some simple math. Take the number of ANSI Lumens of your projector and divide it by the screen size in square feet (area), then multiply that by the screen’s gain. For example a projector with an output of 400 ANSI lumens matched with a 100″ screen (60″ by 80″ which is 33.34 square feet) with a gain of 1.3 will produce an image with a brightness of 15.6 fL.

Here is the calculation for you:

ANSI Lumens of projector

———————— X screen gain = foot lamberts

Square footage of screen
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top