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Discussion Starter #21
Sounds like a good setup to me.

You should have plenty of current and if I'm right about how those high current outlets work, your power amp and powered subs will have a surge protected but otherwise unfiltered and therefore lower impedance connection. And since I have yet to see a power amp care about any realistic amount of power noise, the lack of filtration won't be an issue.

For the extension cord, a 15 amp cord that's 14 gauge (AWG) or less is best.
Thanks, about the extension cord, I could have picked one up like you specified at least in a couple places I can think of, however I ordered one from Panamax that's just like the cord that came with that unit...big amd heavy. The cord itself is 10'...just the right length for getting the power source from that 15 amp outlet. The funny thing though it's grey, not black like what came with the unit. I would have liked to have white, but oh well!

15 Amp 14AWG Extension Cord, 10 FT, GREY
https://www.panamax.com/product/10-ft-extension-cord-GEC1410
 

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In any case, that one meets my 15 amp, 14 AWG recommendation, so you're good there. If you ever feel like replacing it with another, just shoot for those same specs. :)
 

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Wow, thanks for that incredibly detailed explanation. I'm going to have to read it a couple time to fully understand that, but I do get the just of it.

I kept my question simple because I didn't want to confuse anyone with too many facts.

The rest of the information (or question) is...well first the info. I have two JL Fathom F113v2 subwoofers on order, and I happen to have two power conditioners (one of those power conditioners is also a voltage regulator.) The older one is more of a simple power conditioner from Monster, and the newer power conditioner (that is also a voltage regulator) is from Panamax. Is it safe to plug two JL Fathom F113v2 subwoofers into the Panamax power conditioner/voltage regulator OR is it better to plug one JL Fathom F113v2 subwoofer into one power conditioner, and the other JL Fathom F113v2 subwoofer into the other power conditioner/voltage regulator?

Each of those power regulators (the Monster Power and Panamax) are plugged into separate regular home outlets.

Thank you,

The Max 1800 watts refers to “Power Consumption”, not output power RMS from the amp, also measured in watts.
So each piece of gear connecting to the Power Conditioner has an (estimate) of the power it will use/consume (in watts).
Look up your Subwoofers, amps, receiver, Blu-Ray, Set top boxes etc..add those numbers up and kindly post it.
As an example of Power Consumption numbers: An amplifier, including the ones in the Subwoofer can be pretty high. I have a five channel amp that posts power consumption at 1400 watts. A Blu-Ray Player might be only 50 watts posted as power consumption watts. What I’ve learned here is that, even though 1400 watts seems very high, you’d have to put huge demands on all five amplifiers simultaneously to get near 1800.
I hope you post the numbers. Be great to have those numbers, then you can decide if you think you’ll ever surpass.
I think mostly what will happen if you overload big will be circuits tripping. That’s not fun either.
 

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...I would think that one Power Conditioner per Subwoofer would be the way to go, as that will spread the load around evenly.
 

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The Max 1800 watts refers to “Power Consumption”, not output power RMS from the amp, also measured in watts.
So each piece of gear connecting to the Power Conditioner has an (estimate) of the power it will use/consume (in watts).
Look up your Subwoofers, amps, receiver, Blu-Ray, Set top boxes etc..add those numbers up and kindly post it.
As an example of Power Consumption numbers: An amplifier, including the ones in the Subwoofer can be pretty high. I have a five channel amp that posts power consumption at 1400 watts. A Blu-Ray Player might be only 50 watts posted as power consumption watts. What I’ve learned here is that, even though 1400 watts seems very high, you’d have to put huge demands on all five amplifiers simultaneously to get near 1800.
I hope you post the numbers. Be great to have those numbers, then you can decide if you think you’ll ever surpass.
I think mostly what will happen if you overload big will be circuits tripping. That’s not fun either.
I agree about the huge demands required. My experience is that most real world usage won't get you even close to the max power an amp or sub can output or consume. I once accidentally drove a speaker at max volume while playing around with the PC control commands of my amp. If that incident had happened with 5 channels plus a sub, a breaker tripping might have been the only thing that saved my ears. :)
 

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...I would think that one Power Conditioner per Subwoofer would be the way to go, as that will spread the load around evenly.
In any case, one sub will be plugged into the Monster Power's high current outlet, and the other sub will be connected to the Panamax high current outlet (again both on separate circuits.)
It seems like having the subs not only on different power conditioners, but different circuits is the current plan. So all good there. :)
 

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It seems like having the subs not only on different power conditioners, but different circuits is the current plan. So all good there. :)
Having different parts of one's stereo system on different circuits escalates the potential issue of ground loop noise though. Of course there may be no issues at all, however having worked professionally as a system designer I can tell you that if at all possible I always designed systems to have a star ground topology. It gets its name from how all the rays of a star, like the sun, lead back to one point (and are the same length). So too should the grounds of audio systems. In some instances even just using a different outlet in the room [even though it is on the same circuit] for one product can cause issues because the resistance of the greater distance away from the star point changes the ground potential and some gear can be sensitive to even just that, causing a faint hum, buzz, or "hum bars" on a video display [and it is usually not manifested in that distant product but rather the upstream preamp/processor/power amp which sees the new location's alternate ground potential via the ground/shield of the signal connection cord].
 
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It seems like having the subs not only on different power conditioners, but different circuits is the current plan. So all good there. :)
He could install “Whole House Surge Protection” at the breaker box, and toss out the conditioners too.
 

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Having different parts of one's stereo system on different circuits escalates the potential issue of ground loop noise though. Of course there may be no issues at all, however having worked professionally as a system designer I can tell you that if at all possible I always designed systems to have a star ground topology. It gets its name from how all the rays of a star, like the sun, lead back to one point (and are the same length). So too should the grounds of audio systems. In some instances even just using a different outlet in the room [even though it is on the same circuit] for one product can cause issues because the resistance of the greater distance away from the star point changes the ground potential and some gear can be sensitive to even just that, causing a faint hum, buzz, or "hum bars" on a video display [and it is usually not manifested in that distant product but rather the upstream preamp/processor/power amp which sees the new location's alternate ground potential via the ground/shield of the signal connection cord].

This is a very good point. It's something I should have mentioned, and something the @Thebarnman should watch out for. Thankfully, it sounds like things are physically located in a way that allows for easily switching to having everything be on the 20 amp circuit if there's a problem.

It might even be worth testing all the devices for real-world power usage, and if significantly under budget, starting with the single circuit approach, and only trying the dual circuit approach if current is tight.

Interestingly, the manual for that particular sub actually recommends the subs be on different circuits. However, the sub also has optional balanced inputs, and I imagine using these is recommended as well in this case, to help reduce the impact of possible ground loops. Even if the original input from the receiver to the first sub is unbalanced, it appears the subs use a balanced line from one to the other. So having *just* the second sub on another circuit should at least be alright if needed.
 

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He could install “Whole House Surge Protection” at the breaker box, and toss out the conditioners too.
I like that idea because it reduces clutter. Then after that just mount a simple, affordable strip up the back of your rack or along the back wall and you're done.
I use this:
Works like a charm.

In my training on these per room things [which as you all know I am dubious about from the get go] we were told that lower end models protect you from the wall, alone, whereas more advanced models protect you from the other outlet positions on the strip/box as well. Say for example you plug in a vacuum cleaner or an electric drill in one of their outlets while listening to the others. In theory the slight tick or pop you might get from turning on the vacuum cleaner will be blocked from being manifested in the adjacent outlet positions. . . .of course this begs the question: "Why would you be listening to your stereo with a vacuum cleaner running?" :p
 

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He could install “Whole House Surge Protection” at the breaker box, and toss out the conditioners too.
I like that idea because it reduces clutter. Just mount a simple, affordable strip up the back of your rack or along the back wall and you're done.

Whole house surge suppressor at the breaker box is not a power strip. Either may work... but to clarify for the OP, they are not "power conditioners" (which is a waste IMO).
 

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Whole house surge suppressor at the breaker box is not a power strip
I added the words "then after that" to my post in case my meaning was not clear.
 

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I like that idea because it reduces clutter. Then after that just mount a simple, affordable strip up the back of your rack or along the back wall and you're done.
I use this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhO3DE8hOlA
Works like a charm.

In my training on these per room things [which as you all know I am dubious about from the get go] we were told that lower end models protect you from the wall, alone, whereas more advanced models protect you from I the other outlet positions on the strip/box as well. Say for example you plug in a vacuum cleaner or an electric drill in one of their outlets while listening to the others. In theory the slight tick or pop you might get from turning on the vacuum cleaner will be blocked from being manifested in the adjacent outlet positions. . . .of course this begs the question: "Why would you be listening to your stereo with a vacuum cleaner running?" :p
I can’t speak for others but I’ve often said that “I wish I had the money back in my pocket that I spent on questionable Audio-Video products. I use dedicated circuits, and no power conditioning/surge protection. I hope the next thing I do regarding my system is have whole house surge protection installed. Everything runs very quite. When using my fat five channel amplifier, i always felt funny plugging it into a conditioner. Limiting issues. I have a Niles Power Conditioner (was making a low hum so out it went). I loved the sequential turn on and off feature. I also have an old Cinepro conditioner...eventually it too started to hum. Some stuff, as I ponder the past, I could have passed on. I love the simplicity of my current system.
BTW, my wife runs the vacuum cleaner a lot while I’m listening to music...hehe
 

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I can’t speak for others but I’ve often said that “I wish I had the money back in my pocket that I spent on questionable Audio-Video products. I use dedicated circuits, and no power conditioning/surge protection. I hope the next thing I do regarding my system is have whole house surge protection installed. Everything runs very quite. When using my fat five channel amplifier, i always felt funny plugging it into a conditioner. Limiting issues. I have a Niles Power Conditioner (was making a low hum so out it went). I loved the sequential turn on and off feature. I also have an old Cinepro conditioner...eventually it too started to hum. Some stuff, as I ponder the past, I could have past on. I love the simplicity of my current system?
BTW, my wife runs the vacuum cleaner a lot while I’m listening to music...hehe
One either has power quality issues or they don't.

If you have reasonably good power free from noise and glitches, a power conditioner is not going to improve anything. Many audiophile product vendors imply or outright cliam their product adds something extra to the sonic quality. False! Snake oil!

A surge protector is a good idea on source components like DVD players and DACS but those can be had very cheaply and last just as long as a high end unit. Too many spikes will burn out an MOV component. That goes for the $15 Office Depot power strip as well at the $5000 audiophile power conditioner. So why pay more for just surge protection?
 

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One either has power quality issues or they don't.

If you have reasonably good power free from noise and glitches, a power conditioner is not going to improve anything. Many audiophile product vendors imply or outright cliam their product adds something extra to the sonic quality. False! Snake oil!

A surge protector is a good idea on source components like DVD players and DACS but those can be had very cheaply and last just as long as a high end unit. Too many spikes will burn out an MOV component. That goes for the $15 Office Depot power strip as well at the $5000 audiophile power conditioner. So why pay more for just surge protection?
Exactly. There's a grain of truth to all their claims but these things are marketed by scaremongering and exaggerated claims.

Nearlly every other sentence in this demo is either an outright lie or at the very least it is an exaggeration based on an incredibly unrealistic scenario, such as the cheapo gas-station-bought, unfiltered/unregulated cell phone wall warts made in the 90s:


"Ya know that hiss you get from your amp? This thing cleans it up". A LIE. All amps have some hiss and it is not from the AC. [Although there are weird scenarios where there is indeed some added noise from wacky situations that aren't common at all but they make them out to be. ]
 

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The proof it is a con is that they can't show us the actual noise floor of an amp on a spectrum analyzer, before and after, to SHOW that their product reduces the noise.

Also nearly all modern gear is pretty insensitive to AC voltage swings so you aren't going to hear a thing if your AC plummets to say 105V or peaks to say 128V, trust me: modern day DACs, amps, subs, TVs, etc are all insensitive to this, so instead they have tuned a concocted device so the voltage just happens to change the spinning fan/light in those "flame lights".
 

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Oh, one more thing: if you look closely you'll notice the Geiger-counter noise like device he uses called a "noise sniffer" is manufactured by a company called Entech. . . . Guess what? They are a division of Monster! [or at least were] So what this shows is their "unbiased" measurement gear was actually made/ tuned by the company trying to do the scaremongering.
 

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The only power "conditioning" device in my home theater is a UPS. Any time I install a system for a friend, I just use surge protection (on one circuit), and no one has ever complained of any issue that a different power configuration could solve.

For myself, I have the UPS because of how unbelievably bad the power is here. Power to the whole neighborhood flickers on and off in brief spasms on a regular basis, and blackouts lasting from a few seconds to a few minutes are pretty common also. So pretty much every tech device I care about is on a UPS. I just don't trust our power to keep anything running for any length of time otherwise. I even put some of the lights on a UPS. Randomly being in the dark is uncomfortable.

The UPS on the home theater is a massively overpowered unit meant for servers which has never flinched at any load I've thrown at it, including power amps. Just to be sure, I've measured the voltage coming off of it with an oscilloscope while playing demanding material as loud as I'd ever want to, and it was perfect the whole time. This test was successful for both line and battery. Extra points to the UPS for outputting a clean sine wave on battery. Many don't.

I agree you should have a good reason before spending money on any new equipment, and pure marketing isn't a good reason.
 

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I always put a UPS on my projectors because if there's a blackout the cooling fan grinds to a halt and the $389 bulb pops. Ouch. They have saved me more than once and they effectively pay for themselves if it happens just once. Otherwise I use nothing beyond nice and affordable UL 1449 surge protection, as found, for example, in the Tripp Lite strip I showed earlier.
 
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