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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been wondering if I should switch from digital projectors to CRT's because I want a 150inch screen or so, give or take, and I don't think my digital 1080p projector can handle fluid enough motion if I make the screen any bigger. I'm susceptible to motion blur and if I can any higher than 100inches with my IN83 i don't think the motion will be anything close to real and fluid when there is fast motion.


But I forgot that CRT's have limited lumens and you also need sufficient lumens to have a big screen. So can CRT's light up a 150inch screen enough or do I need to stick with digital projectors at that size? Or do I have other options?


All else aside, what is my best option to get a COMPLETELY fluid picture at 140 - 170inches (16 x 9 screen size, sorry), with absolutely no motion blur or visial imagine noise, mosquito noise, artifacts... ?


On top of that good sharpness, blacks, color, whatever else are bonuses, but what's the best option for fluid motion and really clear picture? CRT or something else at the big screen size I mentioned?
 

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Marquee 8500 at 1080p on a 140 inch wide screen.






Athanasios
 

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No, I don't think CRT is what you're looking for.


Sure it can be done (by stacking or blending... and it looks great), but then it depends more on your capabilities (and budget) than the projectors. Total light control and a great calibration/setup is a must.


CRT has a limited number of lumens that you're spreading over a huge area... 4x more than recommended. So you lose punch in the colors and the details get softer and softer.


Big screens are fun and CRT does them beautifully, but I wouldn't recommend any newbie jumping straight into a 150" CRT setup. Start with a 8" Marquee and do a basic 96" setup (nice)... then slide it back to 120" and see what you lose. If that's still acceptable to you, make your own decisions about adding more size and/or more lumens.
 

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A larger screen / field of view will make motion seem 'less fluid' no matter what the display device. Film is shot at 24hz, which is way below the threshold of perceptibility in terms of motion choppiness - ain't no display device gonna fix the source material, unless you get into stuff that does frame interpolation. And then you're back to digital anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Okay,


but if that's true, how come motion on IMAX screens or even just regular movie theatre screens is just as fluid, or more fluid, than motion on my 110 inch screen coming from my infocus in83?


How do they do fluid motion on giant imax screens??? Because that's what I want on my 150 inch screen.
 

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I do not notice and motion problems on my 159 inch diagnol 16x9 with my single marquee. its not as bright as it should be but the size makes up for that and the colors are still great.


Athanasios
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shark7 /forum/post/16928728


How do they do fluid motion on giant imax screens??? Because that's what I want on my 150 inch screen.

Because imax cinematographers/directors/editors shoot around the limitations of the medium - if you know you can't sustain a pan greater than N degrees/sec without visible chopping, you don't do one in the first place. If you watched broadcast sports at 24fps on an imax screen, it'd probably be pretty choppy at times.
 

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I have heard that only 40 inch is the biggest Crt Tv ever manufactured. they can`t go bigger than that because of Physics weight and few technical issues. Which one is the biggest? Any suggestions guys.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by noki123 /forum/post/16939151


I have heard that only 40 inch is the biggest Crt Tv ever manufactured. they can`t go bigger than that because of Physics weight and few technical issues. Which one is the biggest? Any suggestions guys.

Uh, you're talking about direct view, not projection - has nothing to do with what we're discussing here. And the only 40" direct view CRTs I'm aware of were 4:3 SD, so not worth thinking about. I think there were some 34" CRT direct view HDTVs, which were nice, but still didn't come near resolving 1920x1080.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeriSoft /forum/post/16940445


Uh, you're talking about direct view, not projection - has nothing to do with what we're discussing here. And the only 40" direct view CRTs I'm aware of were 4:3 SD, so not worth thinking about. I think there were some 34" CRT direct view HDTVs, which were nice, but still didn't come near resolving 1920x1080.

I have a 36" philips 16:9 CRT but it´s not the HDTV version.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeriSoft /forum/post/16940445


Uh, you're talking about direct view, not projection - has nothing to do with what we're discussing here. And the only 40" direct view CRTs I'm aware of were 4:3 SD, so not worth thinking about. I think there were some 34" CRT direct view HDTVs, which were nice, but still didn't come near resolving 1920x1080.

What i know is that Crt tv are direct View. Thanks for clearing it out.I know they cant reach the resolution of 1920x1080. Its very high resolution.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by noki123 /forum/post/16939151


I have heard that only 40 inch is the biggest Crt Tv ever manufactured. they can`t go bigger than that because of Physics weight and few technical issues. Which one is the biggest? Any suggestions guys.

Usually the biggest CRT tv (which was not a direct view, but instead a three gun CRT projector like the CRT front projectors of this forum) was about 65", but I believe there was at least on model by Mitsubishi that was 73". Hard to find nowadays though. They were HEAVY beasts! Actually all CRT projection tvs were, but the 73" was more so.



Anyway, imo, a crt can handle 150". It just has to be pushed a little harder. I've done it and loved the results and I also own a very bright digital projector projecting onto a super high gain curved silver screen and yet I still thought the CRT did fine at 150". Just make sure to gamma correct. I always used a custom gamma curve in Zoomplayer Pro using FFDShow to pull out the dark details while keeping black black.


You could always stack two CRTs or make a DIY curved screen for increasing the brightness.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTyson /forum/post/16946054


Usually the biggest CRT tv (which was not a direct view, but instead a three gun CRT projector like the CRT front projectors of this forum) was about 65", but I believe there was at least on model by Mitsubishi that was 73". Hard to find nowadays though. They were HEAVY beasts! Actually all CRT projection tvs were, but the 73" was more so.



Anyway, imo, a crt can handle 150". It just has to be pushed a little harder. I've done it and loved the results and I also own a very bright digital projector projecting onto a super high gain curved silver screen and yet I still thought the CRT did fine at 150". Just make sure to gamma correct. I always used a custom gamma curve in Zoomplayer Pro using FFDShow to pull out the dark details while keeping black black.


You could always stack two CRTs or make a DIY curved screen for increasing the brightness.

I agree with Mike, MrBob has a 73inch CRT Mitsu, i have the 65 incher. They have a super awesome HD picture.


My Marquee 8500 is lighting up a 159 inch diagonal 16x9 screen just fine in my bat cave. But add a little ambient light reflecting on the screen and its not good at all. I have spot lights in the back row that i can leave on durring a movie and it is only slightly noticed.


Athanasios
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
What does stack them up mean? you can actually put one crt on top of another?


seems like that would be costly. Wouldnt getting just one CRT with good PQ (as good as or better than my infocus in83) cost around $3,000 or up? (like my IN83)?


Or not?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shark7 /forum/post/16964523


What does stack them up mean? you can actually put one crt on top of another?

Preferrably side by side so they can be calibrated easier.


Quote:
seems like that would be costly. Wouldnt getting just one CRT with good PQ (as good as or better than my infocus in83) cost around $3,000 or up? (like my IN83)?


Or not?

Ones that can do 1080p and resolve it will generally be over $2,000, but I have seen the 1292Q go for under a grand on Ebay more than once with very good tubes.


However, many great 8" units can be had for $700-$1,500 if you keep checking Ebay and catch a great deal. I hate to read someone thinking that to have just a "good" picture you have to spend $3,000 though. I know 7" CRTs aren't top of the line in CRT world, but man,l even a $300-$400 7"ers are capable of a phenominal overall images with good calibration and have jaw dropping contrast/blacks. No, they aren't 1080p, but they can still do things that even the IN83 cannot, so that alone makes them a lot better than just "good" and for a WHOLE lot less than $3,000..


It's like if you took a top of the line 720p DLP like the BenQ 8720 and compared it against a 1500:1 1080p DLP. The 1080p would be sharper and more detailed most likely, but the 720p would have more depth and in certain ways would be preferred, despite the resolution difference. It's hard to say which is better to anyone, because one will have an advantage over the other and it's subjective. An 8"er is definitely more amazing than a 7"er, but the 7"er still has wonderful quality. 9"er.....even better.



Any decent CRT $300 and up will smash the IN83 in on/off contrast though. With gamma correction they are capable of pretty much infinite on/off contrast that adds a certain 3D like depth (with true blacks) to a lot of scenes in which the IN83 could not match even against a $300 7" CRT. It could beat a 7"er or even an 8"er in sharpness and detail...no doubt about that, but that doesn't mean it wins every important area. It won't.


So "as good or better" is subjective and depends on what you like, need or want.


I'd still take a good EM Focus gamma corrected 720p/1080i CRT over a 1080p IN83 if they weren't so large.


I'm really tired, so I rushed through this. I hope I explained everything correctly before I pass out at my computer.
 

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My screen is 168 and I use a single G90.


I'm using all the tube face area I can and have gone over the setup many times to make sure I'm getting the most out of it. Theater is well light controlled and I'm satisfied with how bright it is.


It works for me.


I also have a 720p digital AX200 for games which can be super bright, but has all the issues the op mentioned. And in its 'cinema' mode (where the colors are still way off) its actually dimmer than the G90.
 
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