AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased an Onkyo HT-RC160 stereo receiver. I am hooking up a 5.1 set-up in my living room. I have two small Samsung satellite speakers that I wanted to use as the surround sound speakers. (Rear Right and Rear Left) My question is this. On the back of the Samsung speakers is says that they are 3 ohm. Can I took those up to my Onkyo HT-RC160 receiver without causing any damage to the receiver or to the speakers? How would they sound being 3 ohm instead of the common 8 ohm speakers? Any information on the subject or pros and cons please type below. Thank you.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,076 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudddvayne /forum/post/18167328


I recently purchased an Onkyo HT-RC160 stereo receiver. I am hooking up a 5.1 set-up in my living room. I have two small Samsung satellite speakers that I wanted to use as the surround sound speakers. (Rear Right and Rear Left) My question is this. On the back of the Samsung speakers is says that they are 3 ohm. Can I took those up to my Onkyo HT-RC160 receiver without causing any damage to the receiver or to the speakers? How would they sound being 3 ohm instead of the common 8 ohm speakers? Any information on the subject or pros and cons please type below. Thank you.

Your receiver will probably go into shut down mode and it will eventually tear it up.
 

·
Blues In Thirds
Joined
·
2,522 Posts
generally, the lower the ohms on the speakers, the more power they draw from the source. You might want to consider buying an inexpensive set of 8 ohms speakers just to be safe. If at some point, you decide to go with an outboard amp that can handle a 3 ohm load, you can use them then. Otherwise, I'd probably sell them and spend the money on something that compliments your current system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, that makes sense. I don't want to damage the amp or the speakers.


What are some good very small surround sound speakers that I could set on my end tables that don't take up much space? Of course I would like to get the 8 ohm ones to work well with my system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
You could wire them in series to get 6 ohms and the amp would probobly be fine. But, you would need 4 total speakers.


series 2 speakers at 3 ohms = 6 so in order to get both sides you would need 4 of them ran in series 2 on each side. Do you fallow me?


I did that when i didnt have a center channel, i ran 2 computer speakers in series and put them under my tv till i saved up for a real center speaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, I guess I could do that. I do have 4 of those Samsung satellite speakers. I'm just trying to conserve space, that's why I wanted two smaller surround sound speakers to fit on the end tables.


I have some Polk Audio Monitor 50 series floor-standing speakers and I noticed that there were two sets of connectors on the back of the speakers and what looked like a metal plate connecting to two sets of connectors together. Why? What is that for? Does it have to do with the bi-wiring and bi-amping features of the speakers and what exactly does that do?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudddvayne /forum/post/18167851


Yeah, I guess I could do that. I do have 4 of those Saumsung satellite speakers. I'm just trying to conserve space, that's why I wanted two smaller surround sound speakers to fit on the end tables.


I have some Polk Audio Monitor 50 series floor-standing speakers and I noticed that there were two sets of connectors on the back of the speakers and what looked like a metal plate connecting to two sets of connectors together. Why? What is that for? Does it have to do with the bi-wiring and bi-amping features of the speakers and what exactly does that do?


yea bi-amping, i think that needs alot more equipment though. When you split the speakers like that i think you then need active crossovers to control what speakers get what sounds. Or its a way to split the amp load so that each speaker gets its own amp. Thats a little more deep then i really care to get into this. My speakers will do that as well but i dont think i need to go that far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudddvayne /forum/post/18167968


So to hook them up normally do I need to remove that metal plate that attaches the connectors together?

no, normal is with it in. It connects both speakers to 1 terminal so that all the speakers work together "full range" removing the bar splits the terminal so that you can connect each speaker to its own amp.


Did you get these new? your book will tell you how to wire it.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll check the book out. I probably should have done that before asking the question, but I'm at work now and don't have the manuals for reference. Thanks for the help with my questions. I understand now how to hook it up correctly. I'll be on the hunt for some good surround sound speakers now. I surely don't want to damage my new receiver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
This is how mine are wired, the top 2 are on one set of terminals, the bottom one is on its own. With mine the top 2 are wire and in a ported cabnet the size of a bookshelf. So if i wanted to i could wire it as if it was a little bookshelf speaker ported and tuned for a bookshelf kind of sound say 100hz or somthing (im not real sure what its tuned to)


Then the bottom uses the whole rest of the cabnet for the bottom driver and its ported for a tuning alot lower for a more deep bass.




If you wanted to mess around with bi-amp wiring you could do somthing silly like wire the top to your speaker "A" or zone 1, then wire the second to "B" or zone 2 but dont forget to remove the plates before you do this. You could A/B the different sound of the speaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If I do wire it like that diagram, which inputs do I use on the receiver? The diagram just says amplifier, so I wasn't sure which terminals on the amp to hook each speaker into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudddvayne /forum/post/18168265


If I do wire it like that diagram, which inputs do I use on the receiver? The diagram just says amplifier, so I wasn't sure which terminals on the amp to hook each speaker into.

it may not have the right terminals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudddvayne /forum/post/18168368


It might not...

never mind it does, that is a really cool receiver. How much was it? ive never seen a receiver do this before. HDMI and bi-amping all in one unit, thats nice.


It says on page 18 of the manual explains how to wire it.




It says you first need to set the receiver for "bi-amping" opperation then you wire the top section to the surround back section, and the other half of the speaker to the front for the "low" this might start to get confusing though when setting your levels but you will have alot more control over the sound of your speakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think it was a relatively cheap receiver with a lot of options. I got it for $299 brand new and free shipping from www.thewiz.com .


Thanks for the diagrams, they are starting to make sense now. It looks like I have a lot of wiring to do. I will have my laptop open to this page tonight as a reference while I'm getting everything wired up, haha.


I think the model up receiver from the Onkyo I purchased has a few more features. Satellite radio control, front HDMI input, and more wattage per channel were the main ones. I think it's about $100 more. I haven't used the one I bought yet, but I think I will be impressed and happy with it once I get it all wired up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudddvayne /forum/post/18168482


I think it was a relatively cheap receiver with a lot of options. I got it for $299 brand new and free shipping from www.thewiz.com .


Thanks for the diagrams, they are starting to make sense now. It looks like I have a lot of wiring to do. I will have my laptop open to this page tonight as a reference while I'm getting everything wired up, haha.


I think the model up receiver from the Onkyo I purchased has a few more features. Satellite radio control, front HDMI input, and more wattage per channel were the main ones. I think it's about $100 more. I haven't used the one I bought yet, but I think I will be impressed and happy with it once I get it all wired up.


Just use your manual, it tells how to get into the menu to set the bi-amp mode as well. it refers you to the 2 different pages one to connect it and one to set it in the menu.


The only thing i dont see is the frequencies it sets them to or what the bi-amping even benifits. Unless its just splitting the duty to the amp transistors so they work cooler?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I might google that to see what the benefits are. It would make sense that it does lighten the load on certain parts of the amp, but I'm no expert.


Question:


Those speakers I got, the Polk Monitor 50's... they have 2 mid-range woofers and 1 tweeter on them. It says they are 8 ohms... does that mean that the two mids are 4 ohm speakers wired in series to achieve the 8 ohm impedance? Just some curious thinking...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudddvayne /forum/post/18168603


Question:


Those speakers I got, the Polk Monitor 50's... they have 2 mid-range woofers and 1 tweeter on them. It says they are 8 ohms... does that mean that the two mids are 4 ohm speakers wired in series to achieve the 8 ohm impedance? Just some curious thinking...

Thats a good question, but im not sure. My speaker manual doesnt even give that info. I guess the only way to find out would be to remove the bars on the terminal and check with a meter.


I would guess that onkyo would have considered this when they built the unit but maybe they intend it to be used with their speakers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yeah, I'm not sure. I have a 10" powered sub, also. So maybe because I have the sub, I should just leave the Polk's wired the standard way. I guess that should provide good enough low-frequency sound.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top