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No college degree needed thank God, just turn on your left brain.


Col 1-3 and 6-7 is YOUR TV. This is your TV size and what you are watching.


Col 4-5 then is the optimal viewing distance.


So pick a row applicable to you, then BAM, move to col 4-5 and that's where you are "supposely" seating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBobb /forum/post/16914908


No college degree needed thank God, just turn on your left brain.


Col 1-3 and 6-7 is YOUR TV. This is your TV size and what you are watching.


Col 4-5 then is the optimal viewing distance.


So pick a row applicable to you, then BAM, move to col 4-5 and that's where you are "supposely" seating.

i dont understand what the diffrence between column two and three vs six and seven? and also how can i find out if my computer screen is 720 or 1080? i have an I-Inc 28 inch screen, also what is the diffrence between i and p
 

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  1. diagonal -- size of hdtv set
  2. width -- of in inches of set that size
  3. height -- of sixe
  4. best viewing distance in inches for that size set when watching hdtv material in 1080 resolution
  5. best viewing distance for 720P resolution hdtv material
  6. 4x3 image width -- width of image on this 16x9 hdtv when viewing standard definition material (old regular 4:3 set
  7. diagonal sixze of this 4:3 image; sixe of regular old 4:3 tv set


all viewing distance info is debatable, but is one idea. do a google search, you will find many different recommendatins



TVbc
 

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Ok, i stands for interlased & p stands for progressive. These are the two ways a TV can display or render a picture on your set. Interlased is when the picture is split into two, with each part having odd OR even lines (rows of pixals) i.e. 1, 3, 5, 7 ..... while the other has 2, 4, 6, 8 and so on. The picture is then displayed by alternating the two halfs so fast that it looks like one image (if your in the US then most TV stuff is at 60 frames per second as such 30 of them are made of odd lines & 30 of even lines). Progressive on the other hand is when the picture is displayed whole, so you would get 60 complete frames a second for NTSC US TV broadcast. The pdf is essentially telling you optimum seating distance from your monitor ...pick the size of your monitor/TV, the display resolution i.e. Do you have 1080p televisions (or i for that matter) & then cross referance it with the seating distance. Hope that helps

Cheers,

Jiff
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by JiffOrange /forum/post/16915317


Ok, i stands for interlased & p stands for progressive. These are the two ways a TV can display or render a picture on your set. Interlased is when the picture is split into two, with each part having odd OR even lines (rows of pixals) i.e. 1, 3, 5, 7 ..... while the other has 2, 4, 6, 8 and so on. The picture is then displayed by alternating the two halfs so fast that it looks like one image (if your in the US then most TV stuff is at 60 frames per second as such 30 of them are made of odd lines & 30 of even lines). Progressive on the other hand is when the picture is displayed whole, so you would get 60 complete frames a second for NTSC US TV broadcast. The pdf is essentially telling you optimum seating distance from your monitor ...pick the size of your monitor/TV, the display resolution i.e. Do you have 1080p televisions (or i for that matter) & then cross referance it with the seating distance. Hope that helps

Cheers,

Jiff

oh wow that was the most informative answer i got! thanks so much!
is p or i better? which one is the more new technology?


also


i still dont really understand what the difference between column two and three vs six and seven? and why is one 16x9 and one is 4x3 when its the same tv?


how can i find out if my computer screen is 720 or 1080 and i or p? i have an I-Inc 28 inch screen and does the same rules apply to computer screens? its a 28 inch widescreen ,
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by h3llfir3 /forum/post/16915653


oh wow that was the most informative answer i got! thanks so much!
is p or i better? which one is the more new technology?


also


i still dont really understand what the difference between column two and three vs six and seven? and why is one 16x9 and one is 4x3 when its the same tv?


how can i find out if my computer screen is 720 or 1080 and i or p? i have an I-Inc 28 inch screen and does the same rules apply to computer screens? its a 28 inch widescreen ,

1080p is better because the image is in "true" 1920x1080 resolution, meaning the whole frame appears on the screen at the same time. In interlaced formats like 1080i, only half of the image is on the screen at any given moment (odd and even lines alternate). So theoretically, a frame in 1080i contains half the pixels of a frame in 1080p. 1080p is the newer and the better tech.


Columns 2&3 tell you the width and height of the image in a widescreen 720i/p or 1080i/p formats, as well as 4:3 picture stretched out to widescreen. Columns six and seven tell you the width and diagonal of the image that is not widescreen, 4:3 aspect ratio like in older tube televisions.


Computer screens are usually progressive scan displays, so your monitor is likely a p. Look at the monitor's specs and find the maximum resolution. If the smaller side is bigger than 1080 pixels, then it can do 1080p. If it is between 720 and 1080, it can do 720p but not 1080p.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by dima1109 /forum/post/16915858


1080p is better because the image is in "true" 1920x1080 resolution, meaning the whole frame appears on the screen at the same time. In interlaced formats like 1080i, only half of the image is on the screen at any given moment (odd and even lines alternate). So theoretically, a frame in 1080i contains half the pixels of a frame in 1080p. 1080p is the newer and the better tech.


Columns 2&3 tell you the width and height of the image in a widescreen 720i/p or 1080i/p formats, as well as 4:3 picture stretched out to widescreen. Columns six and seven tell you the width and diagonal of the image that is not widescreen, 4:3 aspect ratio like in older tube televisions.


Computer screens are usually progressive scan displays, so your monitor is likely a p. Look at the monitor's specs and find the maximum resolution. If the smaller side is bigger than 1080 pixels, then it can do 1080p. If it is between 720 and 1080, it can do 720p but not 1080p.

ohhh okay, well heres the screen i have http://www.i-inc-usa.com/product/if281.htm , so screens are generally p? and how do i kno which mode it is in 1080 p or 720 p? also with i screens how do you tell the difference if its i or p when you watch it? and one last thing, i noticed the sitting distance is farther for 720p than 1080p

so is it bad to sit close to a screen using 720p? and one more thing does the seating distance change if the screen is i or p? im not sure


one last thing, does it matter if the tv is plasma or lcd? and is my computer screen a plasma or lcd?


also what does hdmi stand for?


and is my monitor on my computer the equivalent of a tv? or is there something different with monitors than tvs?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by h3llfir3 /forum/post/16915943


ohhh okay, well heres the screen i have http://www.i-inc-usa.com/product/if281.htm , so screens are generally p? and how do i kno which mode it is in 1080 p or 720 p? also with i screens how do you tell the difference if its i or p when you watch it? and one last thing, i noticed the sitting distance is farther for 720p than 1080p

so is it bad to sit close to a screen using 720p? and one more thing does the seating distance change if the screen is i or p? im not sure


one last thing, does it matter if the tv is plasma or lcd? and is my computer screen a plasma or lcd?


also what does hdmi stand for?


and is my monitor on my computer the equivalent of a tv? or is there something different with monitors than tvs?

The reason that seating distance is further for 720p vs 1080p is due to a persons visual accuety .....With 720p you have around 1 million pixals & for 1080p you will have around 2 million pixals. Assuming that you have two screens side by side, one 1080p & 720p, which are the EXACT same size then the pixals in the 1080p are going to be half the size of those in the 720p TV. This is where seating distance comes into play, it is much easier to see the effect of more pixals the closer you sit to the screen. If I asked you to paint a picture of the mona lisa with 1 million dots and then again with 2 million, the one with 2 million (aka 1080p) would be more detailed, now if you put these two pictures side by side and I told you take steps backward, at a certain distance the two pictures would look the same (even thought they are not) as your eyes would not be able to detect the "extra" detail. This is exactly what these values are telling you, at what distance will my 1080p television look the best & again how far can I be away from my 720p Tv for it to look sharp. All computer monitors are progressive, infact modern video cards tend to struggle turning a interlased picture into a progressive one for the computer model.



Your screen is 1920 x 1200 (WXGA+), so you have the computer eqivalent of 1080p (slightly larger actually as 1080p is 1080 x 1920), the seating distance doesn't change with regard to i or p, it is related directly to total pixal count for the screen as outlined in my mona lisa example. LCD vs Plasma has no bearing, HDMI stands for High Definition Multimedia Interfac. So to sum up you have a 1080p widescreen (16:9) LCD screen. Following the guide for 1080p will give you the best picture quality but that said if you go further back into 720p territory then you will still get the effect of HD but at 720 resolutions. Hope that helps,

Cheers,

Jiff
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aydu /forum/post/16916475


Make it easy on yourself. Get as big a screen, and highest resolution you can afford.

This may sound kinda like a wiseguy comment, but it is good advice. The TV does seem to shrink once you get it home and start to watch it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aydu /forum/post/16916475


Make it easy on yourself. Get as big a screen, and highest resolution you can afford.

Unless you have a smallish room, in which case, is like... anybody been to San Jose's Dome Imax? One sits so dang close to the dome that... FIRE THE DESIGNERS!


Can't believe this thread took 10 replies to get hold... oh well.
 
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