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column 1: a diagonal measurement of a 16:9 screen

column 2: given the value in column 1, the width of that screen

column 3: given the value in column 1, the height of that screen

column 4: given the value in column 1, the optimum seating distance for 1080i/p

column 5: given the value in column 1, the optimum seating distance for 720p

column 6: given the value in column 1, the image width of a 4:3 picture on that 16:9 screen

column 7: given the value in column 1, the image height of a 4:3 picture on that 16:9 screen


does that help?
 

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it's the optimal distance (in inches) per given screen size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccotenj /forum/post/16914898


column 1: a diagonal measurement of a 16:9 screen

column 2: given the value in column 1, the width of that screen

column 3: given the value in column 1, the height of that screen

column 4: given the value in column 1, the optimum seating distance for 1080i/p

column 5: given the value in column 1, the optimum seating distance for 720p

column 6: given the value in column 1, the image width of a 4:3 picture on that 16:9 screen

column 7: given the value in column 1, the image height of a 4:3 picture on that 16:9 screen


does that help?

yes it helps thanks :p


i dont understand what the diffrence between column two and three vs six and seven? and also how can i find out if my computer screen is 720 or 1080? i have an I-Inc 28 inch screen and does the same rules apply to computer screens? its a 28 inch widescreen , i think 16x9 , also what is the diffrence between i and p
 

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columns 2&3 are the actual physical dimensions of the 16X9 screen...


columns 6&7 are the "size" of a 4X3 image on a 16X9 screen (i.e. what you see of the "picture", not counting the "black bars" you'd see on the edge).


i = interlaced, p=progressive... for the sake of what you are trying to learn, it doesn't matter...


you'd have to look at your monitor's description to see what the resolution is...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by h3llfir3 /forum/post/16914975


yes it helps thanks :p


i dont understand what the diffrence between column two and three vs six and seven? and also how can i find out if my computer screen is 720 or 1080? i have an I-Inc 28 inch screen and does the same rules apply to computer screens? its a 28 inch widescreen , i think 16x9 , also what is the diffrence between i and p

This simple for you:
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=difference+between+1080i+and+p
 

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Remeber also... 1080p has more detail, so it requires a "closer" viewe to actually see the difference. 720p does not, so you can sit farther away, without missing anything, since it(finer details) is not there.


To simplify it even more: 720p has a "grainer"(rougher) image than 1080p, and actually looks better from a farther distance. Also remember that the distances given assuime normal/uncorrected eyesite in optimal lighting conditions, which are very different between plasma and LCD's. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by rweber66 /forum/post/16915373


Remeber also... 1080p has more detail, so it requires a "closer" viewe to actually see the difference. 720p does not, so you can sit farther away, without missing anything, since it(finer details) is not there.


To simplify it even more: 720p has a "grainer"(rougher) image than 1080p, and actually looks better from a farther distance. Also remember that the distances given assuime normal/uncorrected eyesite in optimal lighting conditions, which are very different between plasma and LCD's. YMMV.



i dont understand what the diffrence between column two and three vs six and seven? and also how can i find out if my computer screen is 720 or 1080? i have an I-Inc 28 inch screen and does the same rules apply to computer screens? its a 28 inch widescreen , i think 16x9


can you answers these too ? :p thankxxx
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccotenj /forum/post/16914898


column 1: a diagonal measurement of a 16:9 screen

column 2: given the value in column 1, the width of that screen

column 3: given the value in column 1, the height of that screen

column 4: given the value in column 1, the optimum seating distance for 1080i/p

column 5: given the value in column 1, the optimum seating distance for 720p

column 6: given the value in column 1, the image width of a 4:3 picture on that 16:9 screen

column 7: given the value in column 1, the image height of a 4:3 picture on that 16:9 screen

^^^^^^^^^^

Looks like algebra to me.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn1 /forum/post/16915641


^^^^^^^^^^

Looks like algebra to me.

lol... hey, a little math never hurt anybody...



hellfire, i'm not really sure how much clearer we can make it...


and you'll have to look at your monitor's specs for it's native resolution...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccotenj /forum/post/16915865


lol... hey, a little math never hurt anybody...



hellfire, i'm not really sure how much clearer we can make it...


and you'll have to look at your monitor's specs for it's native resolution...

I think the operative answer to the original question is "No, apparently nobody can explain this more clearly to you".
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aydu /forum/post/16916740


I think the operative answer to the original question is "No, apparently nobody can explain this more clearly to you".

sadly enough, i'm afraid you are right.... i gave the op the benefit of the doubt the first time around, but if he/she isn't understanding now, i don't think anyone can help...
 
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