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Quote:
Originally Posted by vgk29 /forum/post/16936435


Hello

I need help


Im going to buy a new Camcorder for 700$. Im Thinking of Canon HF200 or HV30. MAybe other?

Which is better? Which is more pro ?

Well i can only compare the hv 30 with a sony sr12 i once owned and the hv 30 has far more options for making good films than that cam had ,there are options for setting most things manualy, its picture is better than the sony was as well.
 

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I have the HV20 and the HF200. I can name the HF200's main advantage in three words.


NO MORE TAPES!!!



Transferring material from the HV20 to my computer is a royal pain even with the HDVSplit program! If you have ten hours of material, you have ten hours of transfer work ahead of you!


With the HF200, take out the SD card, insert in the computer, and copy.


Another advantage with the HF200 over the HV20 is the built-in microphone. Being a solid-state device, the HF200 produces no noise, which means no noise on the recording. The HV20 on the other hand has a very noisy tape mechanism, noise that is easily picked up by the built-in mike, making that audio track completely useless.


Then there was the time a bad tape ruined half of the recording of a product review. I've yet to lose anything on my SD cards even after accidentally formatting one of them. Oops! Recuva to the rescue!


In terms of picture quality, low light performance and overall functionality, I'd be hard pressed to see any significant difference between the two camcorders. The HF200's smaller size might make it harder to keep steady, but it won't tire your arm as quickly as the heavy HV20, especially if you attach extra accessories to the camcorder such as external microphones.


The HV20 is now a backup camcorder, having been replaced by the more flexible -- and more reliable -- HF200.
 

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Francois is mostly correct. The HF series being solid state have many advantages over the HV series which use tape.


Personally, I went with an HF for the tapeless workflow.


However, the HV30/40 do perform significantly better in low-light than the HF series. It's partially due to video being "less sharp" than the HF series. By softening the recorded image you eliminate a significant amount of noise.


If you plan on shooting in great light 90% of the time, then the HF series is better. If you do more "run and gun" type shooting and you do a lot of low-light (indoor, early morning, late night) shooting then the HV series is better.
 

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I bought the HF 200 for the wife, and we are both very pleased with it...


One question... I bought a 3rd party wide angle lensz.... Has there been any comparisons between the $$ Canon wide angle lensz and 3rd party of same???
 

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I agree with Francois, no more tapes. when you do get the hf 200 be sure to buy the "class 6" hcsd card. a lower class will not record high resolution.

night shots...do not expect much from it. but a high powered infrared light might help a lot.

I did not have a sd card slot on my laptop so I bought this set up:
http://www.amazon.com/Transcend-Clas...9419181&sr=1-2


it cost less than just the card. research can find them less expensive on line.

16GB hold 2 hours video.

for Jan J I have one by sony and have not tested it yet.

note: I have the hf 100.
 

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Some fair points BUT anyone who is serious about filming uses a good external mic, loading film to the pc fast is one thing but you might be loading rubbish which is why i like to watch what is being captured on my hd monitor as it captures,i have used as i said a sr12 i owned and a FX7 and tried various canon tapeless ,my hv 30 is sharper than the sr 12, as sharp as my fx7 and as sharp as any of the tapeless cams mentioned, playing friends footage on my pioneer hd set has shown this,one small cameras footage i have seen that is better though is the panasonic GH1.
 

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You do NOT need a Class 6 card for the HF20/200 (or any of the Canon's). A Class 4 card works just fine. I capture at full 24mbs 1080 @ 30p with zero issues.


I kept my HV30 for a month after I got my HF20 and the picture from the HV30 was not as sharp as the HF20. And over a dozen reviews I've read pretty much state the same thing. The HV series softens images slightly. This is one of the contributing factors to its better low-light performance than the HF series.


And I bought the Raynox HD-6600 Wide Angle lens for my HF20 and it is fantastic. I also have non-Canon filters and a lens hood, also no issues. You don't have to buy Canon accessories. The only Canon accessory I bought was a genuine Canon battery for backup.
 

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I can vouch for compatibility with Class 4 cards. I have a bunch of them, no problems whatsoever.


For the battery, if you have a Canon FS100 or FS200, you can use its battery in the HF series. The only difference between the FS and HF series batteries is the packaging. The guts are exactly the same.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francois Caron /forum/post/16947618


How about when the test cards are moving around?

Its a job when they do that but the hvs have vg AF as well as picture res so they can cope
seriously i am not knocking any canon cams and will not be going back to sony any time soon.
 

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If you're considering an HV series, I'd go with the HV40 -it's the only one to have native 24p recording. It's still tape, but you don't have to set up a workflow to get the 24p out of the 60i container, as you do with the HF20/200 (even though it's no big deal once you figure it out).
 
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