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Aha! I knew there was a reason I didn't go with cans like I should have! :)


Ted White penned what I remember as the definitive guide to non-rattling cans on his website, but it was for new installs. He built some *serious* looking housings. Alas, I can't seem to find the thread or website (at least 10-12 months old, I think), and I can't remember if there was anything in there that could be of assistance post install.


Here is a recent hit that may help:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=164575
 

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If you don't have a drop ceiling, you don't have many options. Try shaking the cans by hand and see if you can determine what rattles. Try tightening the wing nut(s) and screws. A dab of silicone caulk should stop any other rattles that don't stop after tightening screws.


Odds are though, that it's the attached junction box cover that is rattling. During construction, I wrapped every one with a few wraps of electrical tape.


You could always turn down the sub. :eek:


Good luck,

Burke
 

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Unfortunately, I agree with Burke....Prior to drywalling, I shook all my cans, and tried to isolate any/all rattles. I wrapped the Junction boxes with Duct Tape as they were the worst offenders. I then wrapped the support guides with tape, as they were the next worse. Without access from above, there's not a whole lot you can do, unless the fixture itself inside is loose and can be caulked.


Good Luck
 

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Art,


I agree that Burke, unfortunately. When I did my basement HT , I made a special effort (per Ted's, and others sage advise) to tighten up those cans as much as possible. I went overboard with the procedure.


But that does not address your predicament. You have no choice, sorry.


Lay the tarp, dissasemble the cans, cut circular the surrounding drywall, and go at it. You will know what is "loose and rattling once up there".


Patch as best you can, use the mud to patiently patch back the drywall circular piece so as to be "seamless". Tape, luck, and patience , and more mud will help. Re-paint.

The drywall patch will not bear a load so no worry there. Re- assemble can.


No other choice, it seems to me. Once discovered, your mind and ears will never forget.


Best of Luck,


BOK
 

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D'OH! I regretted the minute I clicked on this thread. 17 cans and not a one has any tape, duct or otherwise, securing anyting.


The painter finishes on Monday. :(


BOK's reply absolutely depressed the crap out of me.


I'm going to try and forget I read this and hope for the best when I get all my equipment hooked up.


Dang it! All that planning... (insert .wav file of toilet flushing here).


- Ed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the comments! I guess their is another advantage to building your HT upstairs! My HT is on the second floor of the addition. I did this since it is not uncommon to see the sinks or tub in the kids bathroom running all over the floor. My nightmare was to see that water running into my theater! I have access to all the fixtures from the attic. I was looking for what you would do as a fix that would be the most simple based on this knowledge. Thanks again.

Art
 

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There is sort of a joke amongst some of my friends when I mention track lighting. They say, jokingly if not seriously, that track lighting is only desired by gay men. Now, I do not have a problem with people focusing their sexual attentions on the same sex, but every time I look at what appears to be the simplicity of track lighting (both from an installation point and from a minimalistic approach) I cannot help but remember their jokes on tracked lighting.


Its shameful to be in one's 30's and still bowing to peer pressure!


So, putting aside my friends' homophobic jokes, has anyone used or even considered tracked lighting instead of conventional lighting like sconces, cans, etc.? I originally only planned on three small canned lights at the screen wall to illuminate the LRC's, a couple for each of the planned two 3-person sofas, and maybe one at the doorway.


Since the idea in a dedicated theater is to have absolute light control when watching the screen, I would tend to keep to the dark side and use as little lighting in the HT room as I can safely get away wife. I figured I could line the seating area walkways with thin rope lighting as a guide in what I hoped to be a rather dark room even when nothing is playing.


Anyone? Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
WanMan,

If your gay anyway why worry. If your friends are homophobic how can they really be your friends since you are gay. Go ahead give into your primal instincts and show your true self. It will be cathartic. Put up that track lighting and stand up for yourself despite the cultural pressures.


Just kidding:D I saw that line in Steel Magnolias "they are named Steve or David or Michael and they like track lighting". Now what am I going to do I've admitted I've seen Steel Magnolias:D .


Art
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Art Sonneborn
WanMan,

If your gay anyway why worry. If your friends are homophobic how can they really be your friends since you are gay. Go ahead give into your primal instincts and show your true self. It will be cathartic. Put up that track lighting and stand up for yourself despite the cultural pressures.

Just kidding:D I saw that line in Steel Magnolias "they are named Steve or David or Michael and they like track lighting". Now what am I going to do I've admitted I've seen Steel Magnolias:D .

Art
Well you still didn't say if you liked track lighting, Art, hehe. :)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by WanMan

I would tend to keep to the dark side and use as little lighting in the HT room as I can safely get away wife.
Now that's a freudian slip if I ever saw one :D
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by WanMan
Since the idea in a dedicated theater is to have absolute light control when watching the screen, I would tend to keep to the dark side and use as little lighting in the HT room as I can safely get away wife. I figured I could line the seating area walkways with thin rope lighting as a guide in what I hoped to be a rather dark room even when nothing is playing.
Careful with this philosophy--it is one that I followed but wished I had not. I too wanted a minimalist look (no sconces, no cans, only soffit uplighting), but I ended up with a VERY dark room even with 2000W of indirect lighting (lots of non-reflective surfaces). My wife recently suggested that we buy a set of miners' hats so that friends can find their way to their seats--and I'm not really sure she was kidding!
 

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Alex, thanks for the heds up. Actually, my eyes are quite sensititive to light! I have no problems getting around my home at night with all the lights out. I prefer it that way. And if someone stumbles because they cannot see where they're walking then the extra-deep shag carpeting will miffle their screams. :)


My philosophy is more for me than anyone else. Sure, the wife is allowed to use it 'almost' anytime she wants to, but that's about the limit. In another thread, someone pointed out something at lucifer lighting. Some of those lights are down right tiny! The face of the light is only 5/8" and uses fiber-optic light source. I think they also make the optical cable that illuminates itself along its length, too, which may be an alternative to rope lighting.
 

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WanMan,


I use a 3 foot track bar which supports three removable halogen fixtures. It is placed in the front center of the HT room, and is used to highly illuminate the RPTV, equipment rack, and basically is only turned on when I am tweaking, changing out cables, cleaning, etc....


Never gave any thought to the damn thing other than it allowed me to illuminate the front "stage". I went with it so I did not have to cut can holes.

I tried to minimize the cans as much as possible, and was able to go with only three cans (after a lively discussion with the WIFE ;^) after all the smoke cleared.


I do not particularly like the track, primarily as it is a cheap one and those halogens hum like hell. But, it serves a purpose.


I use a backlight behind the RPTV, as well as a small desk lamp (20w bulb), for the attendees to find their seats.

Once seated, lamp is of and it is dark as night.


Art, good to hear you have access from above.


PS-- I remove the track light fixtures during playback, so 99% of the time they are not there. And the track bar is seldom spotted on the ceiling.


BOK
 

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Back to the topic of can lights.


I also taped the junction boxes and tightened everything prior to install.


BUT as a repair if you do not have overhead access from an attic. With the power OFF. Remove the bulb. Remove the 4 screws holding the can to the base. Push the can off the base. Now you can reach in with a hand and tape the loose junction cover plates and maybe even crimp the support bars if nimble to tighten them. Then reinstall the can and light bulb.


Try this on a loose fixture before attempting in your HT. In case you find you can not get YOUR STYLE fixture back together. Better found in the shop than the HT ceiling!
 

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Jim,


Excellent comeback there. I gather this is a "one hand procedure" ( no laughing !! ) 8>0 ........ as those can openings are quite small, in most cases, say 6".


But, before any cutting, please go the route Jim has described.


DO NOT cut any drywall until ALL avenues have been exhausted.


It may entails reaching up there, one-handed, with duct tape, caulk, silicone adhesive, fire-rated insulation, a combo of listed materials, or whatever can meet the heat factor of the cans, ...... etc, to kill the rattle.


Always mind the heat of the cans over time and proceed with caution, as safety is the ultimate goal, less rattle, of course.


Thanks Jim,



BOK
 

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Just to put into perspective what can be achieved through those 6" can openings.


I recently upgraded my theater ventilation. I pulled several sections of R19 out of the ceiling, added a 20' piece of 6" flex duct over a bath room to mid theater rear. Then reinstalled the R19. All by reaching through the 6" can openings.
 

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I was hanging the drywall in my theater over the last few days and had worried a bit about the 10 recessed cans vibrating, but after giving them an unofficial "rattle test" decided that they would be fine.


I would like to say a big thanks to Art for posting this thread!!! :D


I could see that a bit of re-engineering was in order. We pulled down the sheets to get at the cans and fully-siliconed the junction box plate covers and electrical taped the snot out of the hanger brackets. What a huge difference in rigidity!!!


It was not alot of fun pulling down all of the 4 x 8 sheets we meticulously hung...but after looking at the 1.5 hours we spent doing it...it sure beats plan B! :D


Aaron Smith
 

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I noticed mine rattling when I put them in. I put silicone spots around the junction box covers. I planned on going back and siliconing the tracks later after the ceiling is up. My theater is also on the second floor and I have attic access above the theater.
 
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