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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I have a cat5 prewired house. The way the cable guy setup the network is: from the junction box, where the "Feed" wire is coming in for the LAN, he attached it to the wire that feeds to my office room (see pic 1).
In that room (office) he put the modem and wireless router. (see pic2).
Now, I have a situation where, I only have wireless connectivity. and none of the rooms have wired signal...

How do I make the change most efficiently so that I have wired connectivity to all the rooms?

Also, see pic3 for all the wires (that are labeled) in the junction box...

Thanks...
 

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Simple solutions:
1. Locate your cable modem/dsl modem downstairs next to the wiring box. Feed the cable modems WAN port into your router/switch WAN port, then connect the other LAN ports on the switch/router for each rooms wall plate.
2. Keep the cable/dls modem in the upstairs room. Then if you need wired access in that room you would connect the modems WAN port to the router then 1 LAN port goes downstairs through the wall to a switch in the basement which connects all the other rooms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
its a little more complicated than that. First, the modem/router is not in the junction box...its in the office..from where the wifi is broadcasted...
Also there are two sets of LAN cables in the junction box...
one labeled "LAN MB" for LAN master bedroom, and another "M4 MB" for "?? masterbedroom"
I tried moving the modem in the junction box, and hooked the cables going to different rooms to output of the router/modem as you suggested...Didnt work...
It seems like the connection made by the cable guy (as shown in the pic 1 of my original post), is the only one that works, that routes to the office...


not sure what to do here...
 

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its a little more complicated than that. First, the modem/router is not in the junction box...its in the office..from where the wifi is broadcasted...
Also there are two sets of LAN cables in the junction box...
one labeled "LAN MB" for LAN master bedroom, and another "M4 MB" for "?? masterbedroom"
I tried moving the modem in the junction box, and hooked the cables going to different rooms to output of the router/modem as you suggested...Didnt work...
It seems like the connection made by the cable guy (as shown in the pic 1 of my original post), is the only one that works, that routes to the office...


not sure what to do here...
Can you include better photos of the Modem? Is the Modem and the Router the same device or separate devices? The photos don't really show this, it looks like it is just a basic modem with a cable (coax) connection going in to it and a single Ethernet coming out of it? Is this the case?

I would pick up a cheap network tester from Home Depot or somewhere like that, you can get them for maybe $30+ and test the connections to each room to make sure they are wired properly, it is very possible that even though these are Cat 5 cables they are wired for phone lines and not network connections (very common).

If they are wired correctly and you have another connection going back to the basement the easiest route possible is to pick up a small switch from Best Buy or order one from someone like New Egg, Monoprice, Amazon (get as many ports as you have in the house and maybe a few extra just for future use.

Assuming that this is a modem / router combo that has multiple Network Ports (usually all the same color) then you could move it down to the basement which would prevent you needing to get another switch for the basement but would move the wireless down there which isn't really recommended as it will more than likely cut down the wireless performance.

Give us some more info and photos of the devices and we can help more as it seems like we are missing some details here.
 

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I'd move the modem and router into the junction box. That gives you wired connections to any rooms with cables coming into the junction box. That may or may not be the optimal place for wireless access, though - if not then get another router and configure it as an access point and position it elsewhere in the house (perhaps in the office).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the responses!
Let me see if I can capture all the questions here:

Cables in pic 1 (in the original post) are labeled as follows: the cable on the right is labeled: "Feed" and one on the left is labeled "M4 Bed2", indicating its running to the B2 room ie. the office where the modem is.
Note, there is no coax cable anywhere, and I do not have a tv cable connection, only the internet...

There is one model/router (2wire gateway 3800hgv-b) (as pictured below) in the office, and its connected to the wall to the "M4 Bed2" line from the junction box...

There is another "access point" (motorola vap2500) connected to this modem as in picture 2 below.
The yellow cable from the modem is connected to the motorola AP.

One straight forward way this should have worked to begin with, is as follows: (As tdallen above suggests)

1. Put the 2wire gateway in the junction box. feed the "feed" line into the "broadband" socket of the gateway.
2. hook in other LAN cables (which feed to different rooms in the house) in the junction box into the output ports of the gateway.
3. Now ideally the ports in different rooms should be "live", and I could have hooked the wireless AP into one of them .
4. Hook other devices, tvs etc thru out the house into the ports available in different rooms.

Clearly that does not work, instead the cable guy had to create a connection (as shown in pic 1 of OP) and bring the whole setup up to the office...


Given all this, is there any direction?


BTW, yes it makes sense to pick up a network tester to test the ports in different room are live...
Thanks!
 

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Thanks for all the responses!
Let me see if I can capture all the questions here:

Cables in pic 1 (in the original post) are labeled as follows: the cable on the right is labeled: "Feed" and one on the left is labeled "M4 Bed2", indicating its running to the B2 room ie. the office where the modem is.
Note, there is no coax cable anywhere, and I do not have a tv cable connection, only the internet...

There is one model/router (2wire gateway 3800hgv-b) (as pictured below) in the office, and its connected to the wall to the "M4 Bed2" line from the junction box...

There is another "access point" (motorola vap2500) connected to this modem as in picture 2 below.
The yellow cable from the modem is connected to the motorola AP.

One straight forward way this should have worked to begin with, is as follows: (As tdallen above suggests)

1. Put the 2wire gateway in the junction box. feed the "feed" line into the "broadband" socket of the gateway.
2. hook in other LAN cables (which feed to different rooms in the house) in the junction box into the output ports of the gateway.
3. Now ideally the ports in different rooms should be "live", and I could have hooked the wireless AP into one of them .
4. Hook other devices, tvs etc thru out the house into the ports available in different rooms.

Clearly that does not work, instead the cable guy had to create a connection (as shown in pic 1 of OP) and bring the whole setup up to the office...


Given all this, is there any direction?


BTW, yes it makes sense to pick up a network tester to test the ports in different room are live...
Thanks!
If it is functional now in the office than there is no way what your are proposing here would not work assuming you have described everything accurately. I would suggest moving the gateway to the junction box connecting the feed to broadband than just a laptop wired to the router. Confirm you can connect to the router status page so you can confirm it's working than check to see you are connected to the internet. If all that works start connecting things up and start working your way out.
 

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There are good cable guys and there are bad ones. I had one who took the nice long feed coming in from the street and promptly cut 4 feet off of it before I could stop him, forcing me to have the junction wiring much higher in the wiring closet than I wanted. The last cable guy I had was great and did a good job cleaning up the mess. Unfortunately the bonehead who made a mess of my closet may have visited you recently...

Networking components are plug and play. Make careful note of how everything is hooked up (you already have) and then feel free to take it apart and try it the way you want it. Go one step at a time and test each step. If you hit a snag put things back and check in here.
 
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