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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like streaming HD videos on my Blu-Ray player. The problem is, I always get buffering issues when using Netflix or Vudu. Despite having a terrific dual-zone router and being only 30 feet away, the Blu-ray player just can't do the job wirelessly (for one thing, it won't connect at 5GHz). The solution I am thinking of involves running a network cable from my home office, where the router is, to the Blu-ray player.


I want to use a solid core cable because I need about a 75 foot length. That's too long for a patch cable. Can I use a faceplate in my office and not lose any performance? Can I use a twisted patch cable in the office, connect it to a faceplate, then run solid cable from there to a faceplate in my living room, and run a twisted patch cable from there to the Blu-ray player without any loss of performance? Are there Cat6 faceplates?


I am wondering if you use both solid and twisted, you get the performance of the twisted.


Thanks in advance for the advice!
 

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Solid wiring in the wall and stranded patch cords between the wall and the device is standard. As for the wall plates, just get ones that accept keystone jacks and use Cat6 keystone jacks.
 

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Monoprice would be a good source for a 100 foot in-wall rated cat6 patch cable with connectors on the ends. It's in-wall rated. Has male connectors, like a patch cord. I don't know how one would use keystone wall plates with it. A pass-through 'scoop'/'nose' wallplate might be much easier.


$12.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...1&format=6#faq


Pre-terminated avoids the hassle of adding connectors, but it's pretty cheap to punch down female keystone connectors onto the ends. Not sure, but HD/Lowes may sell bulk cat6 by the foot.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erickson00
I want to use a solid core cable because I need about a 75 foot length. That's too long for a patch cable.
No, actually, it's not. But a nice permanent solution in the wall is a good plan!

Quote:
Can I use a faceplate in my office and not lose any performance? Can I use a twisted patch cable in the office, connect it to a faceplate, then run solid cable from there to a faceplate in my living room, and run a twisted patch cable from there to the Blu-ray player without any loss of performance? Are there Cat6 faceplates?
Yes. Yes, and Yes.

Quote:
I am wondering if you use both solid and twisted, you get the performance of the twisted.
You won't see any performance difference, certainly not at this length...



Jeff
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erickson00
I like streaming HD videos on my Blu-Ray player. The problem is, I always get buffering issues when using Netflix or Vudu. Despite having a terrific dual-zone router and being only 30 feet away, the Blu-ray player just can't do the job wirelessly (for one thing, it won't connect at 5GHz). The solution I am thinking of involves running a network cable from my home office, where the router is, to the Blu-ray player.


I want to use a solid core cable because I need about a 75 foot length. That's too long for a patch cable. Can I use a faceplate in my office and not lose any performance? Can I use a twisted patch cable in the office, connect it to a faceplate, then run solid cable from there to a faceplate in my living room, and run a twisted patch cable from there to the Blu-ray player without any loss of performance? Are there Cat6 faceplates?


I am wondering if you use both solid and twisted, you get the performance of the twisted.


Thanks in advance for the advice!


Either or will work just fine. In fact, you don't even need cat6E. However, if you decide to do it, buy pre-terminated patch catch cable/jacks, or invest in a nice crimper. You can always go the 'ez rj45' route so you won't mess up 6E cables.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm
Solid wiring in the wall and stranded patch cords between the wall and the device is standard. As for the wall plates, just get ones that accept keystone jacks and use Cat6 keystone jacks.
Exactly.

Plus, punching down wires is a lot easier than crimping. Just remember to keep the twists in the wire tight right to the terminal.


Also, I keep with me a 200' Cat5e patch cable for testing purposes. I recently had to use it at my own house and was able to reach max HD speeds, so no, there are no issues with that even though technically the max is 33'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by video321 /forum/post/19552286


Exactly.

Plus, punching down wires is a lot easier than crimping. Just remember to keep the twists in the wire tight right to the terminal.


Also, I keep with me a 200' Cat5e patch cable for testing purposes. I recently had to use it at my own house and was able to reach max HD speeds, so no, there are no issues with that even though technically the max is 33'.

Thanks for all the advice, everyone! I am opting for Cat6 to future-proof the setup. It's only slightly more expensive than Cat5e, so why not? I have found a few online retailers that sell individual lengths that are terminated already; I just need to find Cat6 rj45 jacks and I will be set. It's interesting to hear that a 200 foot length of stranded cable performed without any slowdown. I can't wait to have true HD streaming video on my Blu-ray player. If I had known the wireless adapter in it only operated on the 2.4GHz frequency, I would have bought the player without the adapter and saved $50.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
By the way, can anyone recommend a good online retailer where I can find quality Cat6 cables (solid core) offered in lengths less than 100 feet? I do not wish to buy in bulk or put them together myself. I have found a couple sites that sell these but they make no mention of the brand of cable. Does it matter? I just need to be able to get 22Mbps, which is what my Comcast subscription maxes out at. That will be enough for HD video.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Haddad /forum/post/19554583


If I interpreted your first post correctly you want to use wall plates in each room (which is fine). Is the terminated cable you are purchasing for running between the wall plates? if so, do you realize that you don't use terminated cable between wall plates?

Dang, I thought the keystone jack would have the same connector on both sides of it. Yes, I wanted to run a patch cable to a faceplate in the wall, and then from there run a solid core cable to another face plate in my living room, then run a patch cable from there to the Blu-ray player. Are there no jacks that allow a keystone connector on both sides? If not, why not?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erickson00 /forum/post/19554837


Dang, I thought the keystone jack would have the same connector on both sides of it. Yes, I wanted to run a patch cable to a faceplate in the wall, and then from there run a solid core cable to another face plate in my living room, then run a patch cable from there to the Blu-ray player. Are there no jacks that allow a keystone connector on both sides? If not, why not?


You can get them however you wish. Check out the EZ RJ45 and EZ Keystone. You just need to buy a terminator and some jacks, but it's easy to do while maintaining strict CAT6E standards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by hansangb /forum/post/19554861


You can get them however you wish. Check out the EZ RJ45 and EZ Keystone. You just need to buy a terminator and some jacks, but it's easy to do while maintaining strict CAT6E standards.

I really don't want to do that work...I just want to buy the parts and connect them. It doesn't make sense to me that there wouldn't be keystone jacks that allow a terminated cable to connect on each end. Surely there is a market for these types of cables - people like me who just want to "plug and play." I don't want to mess with tools or risk getting a bad connection. If a cable can connect on one side, why not let it connect in the exact same manner on the other side of the plate? Why force someone to wire it themselves? I am going to search for this type of product. It just seems strange that it wouldn't exist.


EDIT: So I just found a keystone coupler, which would allow me to connect two cables that already have the RJ45 connectors attached. This is what I want...
 

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Let us know how it turns out. FWIW 802.11g is good for 54 Mbps, well in excess of your Comcast connection. Could be you are competing with neighboring systems for bandwidth or experiencing interference from other devices, or could be that the bottleneck is Comcast. The hardwire connection will eliminate the former. I stream just fine with 802.11g except for the occasional glitch because of interference from another device. I'll be going hardwired soon because of this.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erickson00 /forum/post/19554887


It doesn't make sense to me that there wouldn't be keystone jacks that allow a terminated cable to connect on each end.

It doesn't make sense to you because you don't understand that there's a reason that wall plates don't have couplers on each side
. The Cat5e and Cat6 standards are tightly defined. For "horizontal" cabling splices are not allowed. A patch panel is allowed on the head end and a wall plate is allowed on the room end. You are actually adding two splices by using a coupler on each end of your run. That is why a coupler is a special accessory and you won't find it on standard Cat 5 or 6 wall plates.
 

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FWIW, it is pretty easy to punch down a Cat 6 cable to a keystone jack. If you buy Leviton jacks retail, the tool comes in the package. Others, you may have to buy the tool separately. You can get the jacks, wall plates, and cable all at your local home improvement store. Some will sell you the cable by the foot.


For what you are doing 100BaseT is fine and you can do it with Cat 5 cable and connectors. It is better to use punch down jacks, but you probably can get away with using a couple of couplers. If you want to do 1000BaseT, that is a different situation. Everything needs to be done pretty much correctly.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm /forum/post/19555225


FWIW, it is pretty easy to punch down a Cat 6 cable to a keystone jack. If you buy Leviton jacks retail, the tool comes in the package. Others, you may have to buy the tool separately. You can get the jacks, wall plates, and cable all at your local home improvement store.

I agree. I don't know if they stock Cat 6 at the local store but they certainly stock Cat 5e and Cat5e jacks which is more than adequate here. I suspect he does not realize how easy it would be to terminate a wall plate, he is thinking of a patch cable and is not familiar with a punch down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've decided to use Cat5e and couplers. It really doesn't matter to me if someone else says it's easy to use a punch down or a tool that comes with a kit. The coupler makes the most sense to me - it's easy and fast, no tools required. Which is how it should be. As for my wireless speed, mine is actually faster than that because I am using an N-router. I don't know if the Blu-ray player supports N (probably not, I bet it's on G), but I have no problem playing Wii. It's the Blu-ray player and Netflix - HD videos will not stream without constant interruption, and it's only about 30 feet between the router and player. It probably is due to neighborhood interference, as there are 5-6 other SSID's broadcasting nearby, but still, the Wii performs well and it's only the Blu-ray player that struggles to deliver. Not allowing the Blu-ray player to connect on the 5GHz frequency is a mistake.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erickson00 /forum/post/19556835


I've decided to use Cat5e and couplers. It really doesn't matter to me if someone else says it's easy to use a punch down or a tool that comes with a kit. The coupler makes the most sense to me - it's easy and fast, no tools required. Which is how it should be. As for my wireless speed, mine is actually faster than that because I am using an N-router. I don't know if the Blu-ray player supports N (probably not, I bet it's on G), but I have no problem playing Wii. It's the Blu-ray player and Netflix - HD videos will not stream without constant interruption, and it's only about 30 feet between the router and player. It probably is due to neighborhood interference, as there are 5-6 other SSID's broadcasting nearby, but still, the Wii performs well and it's only the Blu-ray player that struggles to deliver. Not allowing the Blu-ray player to connect on the 5GHz frequency is a mistake.


Wired will give you better throughput. But if you are using the default channels in your WAP, then others may be stepping on your signal. Try changing the channels to see if that helps. If you have an Android phone, you can download WiFi Analzyer to see what everyone else is using (channel wise) and use the one with the least amount of overlap.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm /forum/post/19557813


Good luck. In my neighborhood, they are all used about the same.

That is the case in most densely populated areas these days. I prefer to use a wired connection for streaming whenever possible. And wired correctly as well...
 
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