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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My neighborhood experienced a rather nasty storm about 2 1/2 months ago that caused enough water damage in my 'mostly unused' family room that I've decided to just gut the room and put a small home theater in it. I plan on getting a cheap camera from Best Buy in a week or 2, because my Blackberry takes rather crummy pictures.


I've added a link to one place that I've found where I can post a simple drawing of what I have in mind. It also does a 3D rendition of it. I need to find something better that doesn't require you to click on a link to locate the drawing. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I've tried Google drawings (whatever they are called), and haven't figured out how to use it yet. This one was easy to use.

http://pl.an/au3z61


This build consists of the HT room, a small bathroom, a small alcove for the AV equip, and a second room that contains a fireplace, couch, and shelves for DVD/Blu-rays. I've already bought ceramic tile for the fireplace side, and will be carpeting the HT side. The room will be a dark room with a black ceiling and black screen room end. The ceiling is 7 foot. There will only be room for 1 row of 3 seats, but one or 2 more could be added for additional seating if needed, possibly.


There are some cracks in the walls and floor that need to be repaired first. Also there is currently a window and a door leading to the outside in the HT room that I want to remove entirely. The ground level is about 4 foot above the floor on that particular wall. I've talked to 2 different people about removing this door. One says don't do it and the other says it shouldn't be a problem. Outside of this door is a concrete stairway leading up into the back yard. There is a drain just outside of this door. I want to brick up this wall with cinderblocks to the top of the concrete wall (which is 4 foot high), and waterproof it. Put a layer of gravel on top of the drain. Knock off the top 8 inches of the stairs, and fill the rest in with dirt.


For equipment, so far, which can change as I learn more, I've decided on:

1) Panasonic PT-AE4000u

2) Screen Excellence Acoustical Transparant 2.35:1 screen. 7 or 8 foot length.

3) A good Denon AVR.

4) OPPO BDP-93 blu-ray player.


Axiom Audio speakers all around, which are:

1) 3 M80 that are the in-cabinet type that will be mounted in the wall behind the screen and extend into the garage a bit.

2) 2 QS8 for surrounds, mounted just slightly behind the back of the chairs on the side walls.

3) And either their EP600 or EP800 subwoofer, black finish, laying on it's side under the screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Now here's a thought that's been rolling around in my head for the past couple of days. I live alone with a cat. This cat likes to be with me most of the time when I'm at home. She's finally gotten used to the loud noise in the living room when I watch movies with my sub woofer and speakers playing at around 80-90 db.


So, I've been wondering about sound proof pet doors, or if even if such a thing happens to exist, that I can install into my HT door or HT wall. Here's one that I've been looking at:
http://www.moorepet.com/MaxSeal-Wall...bwmdf6x7-5.htm

This one has a good thermal seal, but I don't know how good it would deaden sound. This would probably end up being a sound and light leak. It would end up being in the wall in an alcove at the backside of the theater room. Does anyone else have cats that end up in the HT room with them?
 

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Can't tell exactly how thick those flaps are, but looks like less than 1/4", I can't imagine that they would block much sound at all, even if they did seal well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I may end up adding a pet door anyway, since I live alone, sound is not a big issue. In the future, either the pet door could be removed and the wall patched up to match, or some sort of baffle could be placed over the door.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I finally got a cheap digital camera. It's a Insignia that I bought from Best Buy for $50. It's dark outside. I was going to wait for more light before taking pictures, but here they are anyway. They look good enough for this purpose, which is to display the room I'm working with. Keep the room layout from the previous message above this one in mind while looking at these.


Looking across to the stairs leading up to the kitchen and down to the basement.



Moving to the right from there is the wall where one of the book cases are to go and a window to the left of the fireplace. Behind the leftmost paneling is a good access to an area behind the lower part of the TV hanging on the living room wall and the center channel, that's built into the wall. I want to provide some sort of access to this area here when I redo this wall.



Here's the fireplace. It's grungy looking. I'm thinking about buying a kit I saw somewhere on the net that contains cleaners, sealers, paint and overcoat to brighten the bricks and paint them white. There's also some tile surrounding it that I haven't removed yet.



The other corner, where a book shelf is destined to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The same corner with the pole in view.



The door to the garage and the wall where the screen will go.



The wall where the screen will go and a door that I want to remove. The ground level here is about 4 foot high. This door opens to concrete stairs leading up into the back yard. There is a drain just outside this door. I plan on hiring a mason to brick up this wall with cinderblocks, waterproof the outside, put gravel over the drain and fill in the stairwell with dirt. Also fill in the wall above the concrete layer and put cedar shake shingles on the outside to match.



Moving to the right, the door, a window I also want to remove, and the bathroom area. There is another window in the bathroom that will stay. There is a crack under this window that I plan on using epoxy sealer with. It leaks water in storms and you can feel a draft through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A better picture of the bathroom area. There is a shower there that I want to remove. There is also a drain in the floor just below the shower.



Another view of the bathroom and stairs. See how dark the carpet on the stairs is. This is what carpeted this room had, just a couple of months ago before it was damaged by storm water that came in under the door. With this dark carpet and the dark paneling, this room was just awful and not inviting at all. The low 7 foot ceiling didn't help either. Except for the theater room, I plan on brightening this area up with beige colored ceramic tiles, a white fireplace and light colored walls.



Sitting on the stairs and looking at the screen wall. I plan to build a 6 inch wall on the left side, with this pole in the middle of it. I want the wall to come straight down where the short wall is currently on the ceiling that's covering the I-beam and the ductwork.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a couple of foundation wall cracks that I want to fill with an epoxy cement made for this purpose. There are 2 of them about 4 foot long each. (I haven't exposed one of them, but I know it's there since I can see it from the outside.) The size of the crack is about 1/16 to 1/8 of an inch.


My question to those that were satisfied with it, what product did you use?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Please reference the last picture, 2 messages up.


This is the wall where I plan on mounting an AT screen with 3 speakers in the wall for L/C/R that are 15 or 18 inches deep, and 40 inches high. I'm not sure of the screen size yet, but I'm thinking of 8 foot wide with 2.35:1. The plywood that's nailed up there is 7 foot wide. I'm not sure if I should go wider, or not. I don't want a screen I'll regret later as too small, yet I don't want one too big either. The seating distance will only be about 10 foot. Edit: I'm going back to an HT store that has a 9 foot screen and do some more viewing at different distances.


I plan on removing this insulation and the drywall on the other side of this wall soon. Then moving some 2x6 studs to accommodate the speakers. Then drywall the garage side of the wall with a big hole in it that will allow the speakers to hang out the backside into the garage. (Later I'll build an insulated box around the backside of the speakers.) Note: These speakers are in-cabinet speakers and are designed to be mounted this way.


Link to speakers:

18 inch deep http://www.axiomaudio.com/m80-in-cabinet.html

15 inch deep http://www.axiomaudio.com/m60-in-cabinet.html


My question is, how far from the ceiling should I mount the screen?


The ceiling is 7 foot high. The projector (Panasonic PTAE4000U perhaps), will probably be mounted on a shelf, near the ceiling, about 13-14 feet back. Putting the screen closer to the ceiling will put the tweeters further up away from the ears, putting the screen down would seem to put your head closer, to the beam of light, perhaps in the beam of light. One possibility is to mount the speakers upside down.


I'm also thinking that the top of the screen might have to be level with the lens on the projector. If this is so, then the top of the screen would have to be mounted inches from the ceiling.


Any help in this area would be much appreciated. I have absolutely no experience with projectors and this is my first attempt to build a theater.


I need to know soon, so I will know where to put the hole for the speakers in the wall. Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
'm back from the HT store. I wanted to talk to the people there and view the screen they had again. They were pretty busy, but the most knowledgeable person spent some time with me.


From this trip I discovered the following:


1) I want a 120 inch diag. screen. I remeasured my wall and it was just under 11 feet at 127 inches. That's before double drywall and some insulation on the concrete wall. That leaves about 123 inches for screen and frame.


2) I want the screen a little higher than I had originally planned, because once in a theater seat that reclines, you will be looking up more than when just sitting straight.


3) I will probably have to mount the in-cabinet M80's upside down to put the tweeters more at ear level.


4) Epson sells a newer projector, model "9500 UB", for around $2,000. (Well I looked it up and it isn't all that new.)


5) I would need an anamorphic lens for a projector that can display 2.40:1, that starts out in price at $2000. I thought that the Panasonic PTAE4000U didn't need this lens, but from searching the internet the salesperson couldn't determine that while I was there. He said 2.40:1 is a more popular size today than 2.35:1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One more thing that I really liked about the HT room in the store I went to was the wall lights. They said that they used to use sconces like I was wanting, but they replaced them with something better. They built their own sound dampeners on the wall that were about 2 feet wide and 3 feet tall. They were framed like a picture. They stood out about 2 inches from the wall. They had some smaller framing on the wall side, where you couldn't see it that was about 5 inches smaller all around. then 2 rows of LCD rope light was wound around that inner area. This was attached to a dimmer switch.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CatBrat /forum/post/19632092


'


5) I would need an anamorphic lens for a projector that can display 2.40:1, that starts out in price at $2000. I thought that the Panasonic PTAE4000U didn't need this lens, but from searching the internet the salesperson couldn't determine that while I was there. He said 2.40:1 is a more popular size today than 2.35:1.

One of the main features of the 4000U projector is the ability to zoom from 1.78:1 to 2.35:1 aspect ratios, without the need for an anamorphic lens.


I'm not familiar with the Epson that you're considering, but you could save yourself $2000 on the lens as it wouldn't be required with the Panny. Many folks here (including myself) have gone with the 4000U for that reason.


The thing to keep in mind is that to use the auto zoom feature, the center of the lens must be at or lower than the top of your screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by fotto /forum/post/0


The thing to keep in mind is that to use the auto zoom feature, the center of the lens must be at or lower than the top of your screen.

Thank you. That is the answer to my question that I was looking for.


I found and will read the manual for the Panasonic pt ae4000u. Here it is in a .pdf format. Wait for it, it might take a little time to download.

https://eww.pavc.panasonic.co.jp/pro...00U_Eng-OI.pdf


These online instructions are rather short. It refers you to the cd-rom instructions that are included with the projector, for installation instructions.


But it looks like you can place the projector anywhere up and down for the height of the screen. Also it doesn't have to be in the exact center, but up to 40 percent off in either horizontal direction. For a 120" picture, you can be as close as 11' 10".
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here's some pictures of the insulation I removed from the walls today, in preparation to install the new insulation. The old insulation is real light and crumbly. It matches pictures of formaldehyde blown in insulation I've seen pictures of on the web. I went through 2 dust masks, just on this one wall. I have my gloves, coat and pants that I wore in the washer right now.


The dust from this stuff was awful. I opened the windows to help air the place out. I still have another wall full of this stuff to remove. I'm going to use my shop vac and vacuum out the cavities real good before I add insulation back in.


The last 2 pictures is of the new insulation that I bought. The brand is Johns Manville that's R19 and 6 1/2 inches deep, that I bought from Lowes.













 

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looks like you are making progress! My HT was an "oops water sucks" build as well!


Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That's funny. Well, not so funny when you have to live with it, though.


I've been trying to make some plans for the floor in the HT room. Here's what I've come up with, so far.


1st Layer Concrete...Ah, that's already there.

2nd layer Dri-Core.

3rd layer Carpet Pad.

4th layer Heating Mat.

5th layer Carpet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I really hadn't thought it through. I can't put the new insulation in until I have the window and door removed, put up all of my walls, take out all of the old wiring and rewire everything. The insulation has to be the last thing I do before putting up the drywall. Although I may be able to put some sheet insulation up against the concrete half walls after removing the 2x2 studs going down the wall there. That is, after fixing the cracks in the walls. Jeesh.


I just hope it doesn't get too cold for too long here in Missouri this winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Anyone here in the Kansas City area?


I thought I'd check so we could either help each other out, and/or, show each other what we've done or talk about what we've planned so far. Usually, 2 heads are better than 1.
 
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