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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm shopping for a couple of home theater recliners, and I'm trying to decide between leather (match, actually) and cloth upholstery.


We've got four cats running around, all but one with their claws intact. They're pretty good about using their scratching posts instead of the furniture, but there is still the incidental claw to furniture contact when they jump up onto a piece of furniture.


With cloth this isn't really a problem. We're worried that leather would be subject to pinholes from the cat claws. I am told that some grades of leather are pretty tough. Does anyone have experience with cats and various grades of leather furniture?


Thanks,


--Mike
 

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Hi,


iv got leather in my living room.it`s pretty good leather and there is NO WAY my cats can claw through it...they wont even think about using it for a scratching post as there really is no way for them to grip it:)


Just make sure they don`t mistake it for an animal and Pee on it to mark there territory:p


Having said that,id still go for the cloth upholstery recliners,more comfy and better colors to choose from,


good luck-


tommy
 

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Oh man .... I actually cringed when I saw that subject line. I thought you were going to tell a disasterous story. By the way how much would it cost to have the other 3 declawed and is that a good or a bad thing for cats? I have no idea, but it would be something to consider I guess. Good luck with this. - CP
 

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Some So called Animal rights people are against it,but who cares!


as long as the cats are indoor cats and not to old,go for it.


ts
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It makes me cringe, personally, and I'm not particularly sensitive to activist issues. I don't have a problem with neutering, but balk at taking off their toes at the last knuckle. Selective logic, I guess.


The irony is that the one declawed cat is our only outdoor cat... He gets his ass handed to him by the other neighborhood cats, but the coyotes haven't gotten him yet, and boy can he hunt.


I find cloth to be more comfortable, but leather is easier to clean (especially cat hair).


It looks like it will probably be cheaper and safer to go with cloth. Now I guess I can worry about finding a cloth color/pattern that I like.


Thanks,


--Mike
 

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Another option instead of declawing is called a tendonectomy [sp?]. This is where they cut the tendons on each toe that operate the claw. The cat still has claws, but they cannot push them out. You still need to clip the claws every now and then because they still grow at a normal rate. Recovery is two days instead of two weeks for the declaw procedure.


Sincerely,

Adam Groth
 

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Hi Mike,

We have leather furniture and our cat never claws at it. She sleeps on the sofa and chair and has never clawed at them or left any accidental pinholes. She prefers to scratch at her scratching posts and prefers the rope part of it. All cats are different however, my past cats preferred scratching the carpet part of the scratching posts instead of the rope part and once even destroyed the back corner of a fabric chair, which they would use as a scratching post. I would think that cats would be more drawn to scratching at fabric furniture, then leather, however like I said, all cats (like people) are different.


I have heard there are a lot of vets who will not even perform the surgery of declawing a cat. Some cats will remain in pain their whole life after having this procedure done. Like you mentioned “taking off their toes at the last knuckleâ€. It would be the same as us having our fingernails removed by having our fingers removed at the first knuckle.


While our furniture was quite expensive we would never sacrifice our cat’s well being for something that is just a mere material object. When my life is all done and said I will not be looking back at the material things I had in life, but will always remember the lives that provided me with so much unconditional love which taught me the true meaning of what life is suppose to be about (not our Home Theaters, but the other sprits we encounter during our short stay here and how we interact with them).


Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My concern is not for deliberate scratching, but the incidental damage caused when clawed critters haul ass across a piece of furniture during a game of "hunt your buddy", or use claws for that extra bit of traction when jumping onto the back of that chair.


I won't get into the subject of cats pulling out interconnects, or unplugging the TiVo while we were on vacation.


I think I'm still up in the air on cloth vs. leather, though. Cheaper vs. easier to clean...


What about different grades of leather and the trade-offs between comfort and durability?


--Mike
 

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I have an Eames chair in the HT room with very soft leather that looks like hell now because of my 2 cats. They never intentionally clawed it, but when they are chasing each other around, they will jump up on it and use their claws as brakes. They have not torn through the leather but there are numerous cosmetic scracthes and nicks. It is something to consider if you care about the appearance. My opinion is if you have cats indoors, you might as well resign yourself to some funiture damage.


If anyone knows of some leather furniture that is resistant to claws please let me know.
 

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""""Some cats will remain in pain their whole life after having this procedure done.""""



My cat never mentioned this to me,ill have to ask her if she is still in pain the next time we speak:D


Tommy
 

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Mike,


We have three year old cat named Yoda. He still has his rear claws, at my wife's insistance, but we removed the front. I have four Berkline 090's recliners in Grade 3 leather. I was concerned about pinholes, also. This leather is very tough, and has resisted any damage from his claws in the year we have had the loungers.


One good thing is that the leather is so easy to clean and doesn't collect cat fur, like our living room furniture. The cat still likes to claw at furniture, although he has no claws, go figure, must be instinct.


Yoda sheds like crazy, even after frequent brushing. So since I have built the dedicated HT, we keep him out since we have so much black furniture and black wall treatments.
 

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if you are worried you can train the cat to keep off of your couch with a squirt gun or loud clapping noises


cats are easy to train
 
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