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New and improved Eyevision among technological advances highlighting CBS Sports' Super Bowl XXXVIII coverage




Super Bowl XXXVIII, Pre-Game and Halftime To Be Part of Industry’s Biggest

High Definition Television Production

Other Technology To Be Used for Super Bowl XXXVIII Includes CableCam, Advanced Digital Disk Recorders for Replays, PVI’s “First Down Line†and Kicker Graphics and Dolby Digital Audio

When CBS Sports presents Super Bowl XXXVIII on Sunday, Feb. 1 (6:00 p.m., ET) from Reliant Stadium in Houston, Texas live on the CBS Television Network, highlighted among the many technological advances that will be incorporated during its coverage is the new and improved replay system, EyeVision.



EYEVISION

EyeVision, first introduced by CBS during its coverage of Super Bowl XXXV in Tampa in 2001, is a multiple-camera replay system that allows fans to see the replay of a particular play from a multitude of different angles. This year, CBS has incorporated changes that will result in the improved video quality of EyeVision replays by spacing the cameras closer together from 12 degrees in Tampa to 5 degrees in Houston, lowering the camera angles, as well as improving the calibration and rotation of each camera. Since 2001, EyeVision has been used for such major sporting events as the NCAA Men’s Final Four Basketball Championship, the NHL’s Stanley Cup Finals, other Super Bowl games, and currently in the Champions League (soccer) in Germany.


HIGH DEFINITION TELEVISION

CBS Sports’ coverage of Super Bowl XXXVIII also will include the industry’s biggest production of programming in high definition television format as Super Bowl XXXVIII, the pre-game show, THE SUPER BOWL TODAY, and the halftime show, AMERICA ONLINE SUPER BOWL XXXVIII HALFTIME SHOW, will be broadcast in HDTV. CBS Sports' Super Bowl XXXVIII HDTV broadcasts will feature the highest definition television format – 1080 lines of picture resolution – and 5.1 Dolby Digital surround sound. For the first time on a Super Bowl broadcast, the unified productions for the Standard Definition and HD telecasts will feature the same camera angles, replays, graphics and announcers. Also for the first time in a Super Bowl broadcast, the pre-game show, the game, halftime and post-game show will be presented in HD.


CABLE CAM

Other technological advances that will be seen and heard on the Network’s coverage of Super Bowl XXXVIII will include the use of CableCam, a suspended camera flying on a cable that can go up to 20 mph, which will give viewers the ability to feel the action by following the play from an angle of behind the offense. CableCam will be used for the first time for a Super Bowl broadcast and also will be seen in HDTV.


DIGITAL DISK RECORDERS

Replay production capability will increase with the use of more Digital Disc Recorders (DDR). With the use of increased DDR, the ability to share material quicker for replays will ensure that viewers get all possible looks available of a given replay on a particular play.


PVI GRAPHICS

Princeton Video Image’s (PVI) “First Down Line†and kicker graphic, that shows a kicker’s success rate from various distances in 10 yard increments, as well as special animated virtual billboards, also will be used throughout the game.


AUDIO

As mentioned pertaining to the HDTV broadcast, audio will be enhanced with 5.1 Dolby Digital sound for “digital network†viewers. Standard audiences will get Dolby “Pro-Logic†surround, which is standard surround sound.

Greg Gumbel and Phil Simms will call the play-by-play of SUPER BOWL XXXVIII, along with Armen Keteyian and Bonnie Bernstein reporting. Mark Wolff will produce and Larry Cavolina will direct.


Sean McManus is President, CBS Sports. Tony Petitti is Executive Producer. Both McManus and Petitti serve as Executive Producers for The CBS Television Network’s coverage of Super Bowl XXXVIII
 

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Ken H, quick question.


the eye vision replay, from what i remember, utilizes MANY cameras. are these cams going to be in HD or are we going to be flipping around from SD to HD?


thnx KEN H
 

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Great. I loved the PVI graphics when they used them on kicks etc...
 

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One minor quibble..ABC used sky-cam last year on the game.

I agree, Vagetto, the PVI stuff for kickers is fantastic.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by rob8558
Ken H, quick question.


the eye vision replay, from what i remember, utilizes MANY cameras. are these cams going to be in HD or are we going to be flipping around from SD to HD?
The Eyevision cams are different than the cameras used for game action. Due to the complexity of the system and number of cameras required, I'm 99% sure Eyevision will be SD.
 

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Steve,

The line in the release is:

CableCam will be used for the first time for a Super Bowl broadcast and also will be seen in HDTV.


Yes, the first time in HD, but not the first time it's been used.
 

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What's the eye-vision... the bullet time type stuff where they pause the play and circle it?


From the summary above I thought they meant they just catch a lot of angles of the same play, so they have a lot of angles to replay.
 

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>What's the eye-vision...


The system uses many (20?) cameras installed around perimeter of stadium. Each camera is focused on same scene. In rapid succession, the network shows still pics taken from each camera. Gives the viewer the feeling of flying around stadium to review a play on field. Neat stuff. Kevin
 

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In Tampa three years ago, I believe they used 30 cameras for eye-vision, each separated by 12-degrees. This year, with 5-degrees of separation, I would suppose we will see 72 cameras in use.
 

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I remember the eyevision from the Baltimore/Giants super bowl a few years ago. It's a gimmick for championship events. The cameras are so zoomed out that it doesn't give you a good closeup replay of the action.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by JMMHouston
I remember the eyevision from the Baltimore/Giants super bowl a few years ago. It's a gimmick for championship events. The cameras are so zoomed out that it doesn't give you a good closeup replay of the action.
This is why they developed an advanced version; we'll see how good it is in a few days.
 

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Yeah, the last time they used it was 3 years ago, and that was also the first time they had ever used it. Give a team of engineers 3 years and a bunch of money to improve on a concept and I bet they'll be able to come up with something better. :)


Lee
 

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My undocumented perception of the eyeview technology:

It looked like eyevision had all the cameras focused on the entire field. To get a replay, the system would "digitally zoom" into the area of the field where the play occured to show its movement around the replay (Matrix style). Even if they were using HD cameras, the Eyevision replay would still appear as SD, but still better than beginning with SD cameras.

It would be really cool if someone could come up with the computing to combine stereoscopic eyeview cameras into a real time 3-d model to present a seamless movement around the field (Would that be the end of needing cameramen?), but they must of decided more cameras was cheaper.
 

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Re EyeVision


If they said they previous spaces the cameras every 12 degrees, that must have been 30 cameras. With 5 degree spacing, we should have 72 cameras! Wow!


That said, the technology as I understand it, those extra cameras merely give us better motion during the 'paused' and 'rotation' part of the EyeVision system. So that is good.


But I highly dout they are putting 72 HD cameras on the roof or better on the concrete seperating the main levels of seating! If you recall in 2001, and mind you, my wife gave birth a few hours before the Super Bowl in 2001, so my viewing was restricted to a hospital 20" TV watched from afar with a thankfully sleeping newborn and wife nearby... In 2001, the pictures looked as if they came from "webcam's" in my opinion. The color level was more like a home-quality web cam, not even a regular video camera.


My guess is that with the increase in quality of digital (not high def) camera technology, this will look like a quality in between SD and HD. A digital camera is better than SD by default. The entire EyeVision process is done on a computer, so it is a digital system. What's an HD set-up - 1080 x what? I think a high end home digital still camera would give enough quality that when fed into the computer for processing would produce a great HD experience.


Like someone said, we'll find out in a few days... With the video games on the market and a higher percentage of HD viewers, they can no longer 'play' with new technology. It has to be of the highest quality for broadcast and I trust with a 3-year absence and no one having tried it in the mean time, it's gonna be of the quality that their viewers expect these days.


Cheers,

Caleb
 

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That's a good question. I do think they have the ability to see what we see at home, so they might be able to see if one of the looks on a questionable call is Eyevision.
 
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