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Looking at 32" HDTV's this evening in Circuit City. When I asked the sales guy what the source and resolution of the image was he informed me that it was off of cable and was 265 lines. His boss said the same thing and stated that this is what their training had told them.


Is there a factual basis for this? Anyone know where it came from?


Thanks,


Aslan...
 

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I work at CC and have never had any crazy training like that... Sometimes I wonder where these people really hear this stuff. I don't know what else to say.


At our store, all the tvs are hooked up to a new high definition feed that is in the back, I haven't actually gone back and looked at it, but it is at least dvd quality.
 

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I always thought that the most that could be delivered through the RF jack was 330 lines. If it was cable then 330 lines was all there was.

VHS is 240-250 lines. Cable is noticeably better than VHS.
 

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The local CC has numerous HDTV's hooked up via the coax, instead of component, so they look like complete crap. Down the road, Tweeter blows them away with an amazing High Def showroom.
 

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NTSC & RS-170 video are 525 lines of resolution displayed as two interlaced 262 line fields 1/60 of a second apart. A VCR can not write that much data so it only records one of the two fields every 1/30 second.
 

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Maybe i jumped to a conclusion that was wrong. I thought the 265 lines was in reference to the horizontal resolution not the number of scan lines(vertical resolution). Which one are we talking about?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by rogo
"There are four lights."


Name the character and the TV series :).


Mark
Jean Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) - ST TNG in the episode where he's being tortured.


Just happened to see it the other day.
 

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A TV with "no" comb filter is designed to be able to resolve picture details no narrower than approx. 1/260'th the screen height (1/260'th the diameter of the largest circle that fits the screen).


I didn't think that any manufacture made HDTV grade sets that did not have a comb filter for use when receiving analog broadcasts or composite input.


Maybe the cable program source material was watered down to have no better resolution, so that more channels could be transmitted down the cable. Maybe the cable tuner box was delivering the video via S-video in which case analog cable channels need a comb filter in the cable box and there wasn't one there resulting in the same limitation of resolution.


More video hints:
http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
 
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