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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Things are taking shape and I'm ready to mount the decking on my stage and riser. My stage is decoupled in three parts with the two ends filled with sand. For the middle of the stage and the riser I was thinking of filling them with Cellulose insulation instead of fiberglass. What are your guys thoughts on this?


Thanks
 

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I use cellulose on everything. :) If its on wood it should be fine, but if its on slab I would place a vapor barrier between the cellulose and slab. I have no idea on the damping characterisitcs with cellulose in a stage environment.


Ted K.
 

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I would not use cellulose in a basement (especially on the floor) for fear of absorbing water/mositure and causing mildew problems....sorry I have not followed your project to know whether or not it is in basement or another level, but just my 2 cents.


-Jason
 

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Cellulose is dirty and a pain to clean after. We used insulation batts in the stage and blown cellulose in the riser. The cellulose was quick, but it left a layer of dust everywhere including the walls.
 

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Jellyman,


I used cellulose in my walls, ceiling, and now I will use it my stage and riser. They are two ways to install cellulose dry or wet. I have done both. I have no construction experience and both were pretty easy, the wet was a little harder than the dry, but the dry can be a little messy. I blew (dry) all my walls and attic of my house, the biggest pain in the ass was the fabric you have to staple on all the studs, but the wet is pretty easy to deal with. I am doing both for my HT. Wet for the walls and dry for the ceiling and stage. Another thing about the slab, is that you should probably treat the slab before placing the stage or riser on it. The below is post from Ted White concerning my HT.

Quote:
Originally posted by Ted White
Ted,


That's about right. I added a bit more for that front alcove and came up with 990 square feet, assuming 9' ceilings. This doesn't include stages and risers. I say that because it's optimal to coat the entire floor with Green, then add your next layer of underlayment, then build the rest of the room on this new floor. The whole structure is on a Green floor, in this case.


Risers and stages sit atop this Green floor, and have green in them as well. So your final calculation will need to add in risers and stages if you were to build as I just described. This would yield a very damped room.


To go with 50% coverage it's exactly as you suspected. Just increase the yield per gallon from 60 sq. ft. to 120 sq. ft.
 
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