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i acquired a brand new 125 electric spectrum elite screen, and am building an outdoor projector area under a deck. I'm considering removing the screen from the metal box that it rolls up into and making a fixed screen because I'm worried the wind will cause the screen to move excessively. anybody ever done that with an electric screen?
 

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Most rollup screens don't really stretch, which can make them a little less forgiving to pull tight over a frame.
If that screen's material is too stiff, it may not politely handle bending around the new frame's front edges to be attached along the outside edges like normal..so you may end up having to attach it directly to the new frames front and cover the staples or other attachment method with a velvet tape or black border.

Alternatively
Do you have a different spot you could use the screen as-is, while using a few plywood panels and an Exterior Flat Light-Base paint to build yourself an even more wind-resistant outdoor screen for under $100?
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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I feel a better solution would be to purchase a Grommet Maker.

You could the place 2 Grommets at each end of the Black Surround, just above the Weighted Bar, and using "S Hooks" and adjustable Tension Cords, tie down the bottom corners against and reasonable amount of wind induced movement.

Doing such would still allow you to / almost completely retract the Material, something that is petty important since that material is not weather resistant, lat alone weather proof.
 

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Would there be any advantages of using grommets just above the bar instead of hooking the tension rope directly to the ends of the bar itself?
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Would there be any advantages of using grommets just above the bar instead of hooking the tension rope directly to the ends of the bar itself?
With Grommets, the Tie Downs can be stretched out at angles, providing more sideways tension'ing...something that would be more effective than the support only being vertical from top to bottom.

That, and it's more likely the Poster will have something to attach the cords to out at each side, as opposed to directly beneath.
 

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That's what I was thinking at first too, but then I realized pulling the screen at a sideways angle from grommets near the bottom bar wouldn't be able to effectively stretch/tension the material without fighting its locked horizontal position at the bar itself...with any significant outward pull, the screen could end up puckering back inward toward the bar beneath the grommets.
The safest direction to pull would be down+forward and down+back (at each bottom corner)

This could, of course, be easily tested by simply having two people firmly pinch and pull the screen from the would-be grommet positions in opposite diagonal directions before putting any holes in the screen. That'll give a good idea if there's actually anything to be worried about angle-wise, or if it should be fine either way.
I'm probably just being paranoid, but it can't hurt to check before poking holes you can't take back.

EDIT: thinking about wind's effect, anchoring the screen's bottom at each corner with each corner being held down at a forward and rearward angle might be best..better at resisting the wind's push than a sideways or side-diagonal anchor.
This could be done from grommets or directly from the bar ends.
Not sure if I explained that well enough.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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One "idea" is not really good at all, and not advisable if one understands how the sheering forces from wind will affect the material.

I sail / have sailed, and there is a real reason Sheet Lines, and even more so shorter Lanyard lines are pulled at angles. It is to prevent the tendency of a sail to twist in variable (...and strong...) wind conditions.

Even a Square Sail, such as are used on Scows and Barges are tied to the side. The only Sails that were tied in the manner Ftoast describes are those that were designed to run directly with a wind. (Galleys-Long Boats) and even those had to employ rigging that addressed sail rotation. It was not an very effective method....that is why you just don't see sails rigged in that manner.

A material tied as otherwise suggested is more likely to / will flap (luff) and twist in any cross ways wind, and bow (cup) in a direct wind. Diagonally tied, the strength of the material is used more effectively to create a more distributed resistance....and is more equally balanced against wind from different directions.
(...also to be considered is that a strong direct downward pull could be detrimental to the Screens Roller mechanism...)

There really is no argument to be had here....just a contrary point of view that goes against known values that are literally centuries old.

tig448, choose your tie down method wisely, lest you find yourself 3 sheets to the wind.:p


Post Note:
With just 2 "Lanyards", the screen will be held steady in any light wind. If retract-ability is to be maintained, you cannot add Grommets to the sides higher up. However you could use multiple adjustable Cotton Cordage Lanyard Lines with these Tarp Clips.

The Clips might be a better, less intrusive solution anyway.
Tip: Use a small Dowel with the Clip to help distribute the Grip strength

Obviously, strong wind conditions warrant going inside for your entertainment.

"They said it couldn't be done. Well, we sure showed 'em otherwise!"
HAS Advanced Audio and Imaging Solutions...Audio Transducers & Projection Screen Coatings
 

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One "idea" is not really good at all, and not advisable if one understands how the sheering forces from wind will affect the material.

I sail / have sailed, and there is a real reason Sheet Lines, and even more so shorter Lanyard lines are pulled at angles. It is to prevent the tendency of a sail to twist in variable (...and strong...) wind conditions.

Even a Square Sail, such as are used on Scows and Barges are tied to the side. The only Sails that were tied in the manner Ftoast describes are those that were designed to run directly with a wind. (Galleys-Long Boats) and even those had to employ rigging that addressed sail rotation. It was not an very effective method....that is why you just don't see sails rigged in that manner.

A material tied as otherwise suggested is more likely to / will flap (luff) and twist in any cross ways wind, and bow (cup) in a direct wind. Diagonally tied, the strength of the material is used more effectively to create a more distributed resistance....and is more equally balanced against wind from different directions.
(...also to be considered is that a strong direct downward pull could be detrimental to the Screens Roller mechanism...)

There really is no argument to be had here....just a contrary point of view that goes against known values that are literally centuries old.

tig448, choose your tie down method wisely, lest you find yourself 3 sheets to the wind.:p


Post Note:
With just 2 "Lanyards", the screen will be held steady in any light wind. If retract-ability is to be maintained, you cannot add Grommets to the sides higher up. However you could use multiple adjustable Cotton Cordage Lanyard Lines with these Tarp Clips.

The Clips might be a better, less intrusive solution anyway.
Tip: Use a small Dowel with the Clip to help distribute the Grip strength

Obviously, strong wind conditions warrant going inside for your entertainment.

"They said it couldn't be done. Well, we sure showed 'em otherwise!"
HAS Advanced Audio and Imaging Solutions...Audio Transducers & Projection Screen Coatings
You might've misunderstood me. I'm saying DO anchor at angles..I'm simply suggesting anchoring at angles directly against the way the screen can flap rather than off toward the sides.
Think less trampoline, more triangular bridge support.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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You might've misunderstood me. I'm saying DO anchor at angles..I'm simply suggesting anchoring at angles directly against the way the screen can flap rather than off toward the sides.
Think less trampoline, more triangular bridge support.
No misunderstanding involved...your "Edit" came 2 hours after my post. And the above quote is not what you originally posted.

This is:

That's what I was thinking at first too, but then I realized pulling the screen at an angle from grommets near the bottom bar wouldn't be able to effectively stretch/tension the material without fighting its locked horizontal position at the bar itself...with any significant outward or diagonal pull, the screen could end up puckering inward toward the bar beneath the grommets. The safest direction to pull would be down.
No matter..under really stiff wind conditions, yes, the screen would benefit from being tired down diagonally both forward and rearward at each corner...much like a Badmitton Net is tied off at angles, away from the "Out of Bounds" side lines.

But if only one set of ties are desired / possible, diagonally, and straight out to the sides would be the most effective.
 

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No misunderstanding involved...your "Edit" came 2 hours after my post. And the above quote is not what you originally posted.

No matter..under really stiff wind conditions, yes, the screen would benefit from being tired down diagonally both forward and rearward at each corner...much like a Badmitton Net is tied off at angles, away from the "Out of Bounds" side lines.

But if only one set of ties are desired / possible, diagonally, and straight out to the sides would be the most effective.
My mistake then, I'm glad my description was understandable (albeit late).

I do agree with your point about diagonal-sideways leaving less leeway for the rope in a single tie per corner situation.
 

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i acquired a brand new 125 electric spectrum elite screen, and am building an outdoor projector area under a deck. I'm considering removing the screen from the metal box that it rolls up into and making a fixed screen because I'm worried the wind will cause the screen to move excessively. anybody ever done that with an electric screen?
If you want to keep the retractability of the screen, and not make any damaging holes in the screen itself, you might create a full-height clamp to go on each side of the screen. Two 6' lengths of 1x3 oak painted flat black on each side might provide enough stiffness and weight to hold the screen square in combination with the case at the top and the weight bar at the bottom. Three or four of these https://www.amazon.com/MR-Jiang-Bicycle-Binder-Clamp-Release/dp/B013QA5MOY/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1505114047&sr=8-6&keywords=clamp+bolt&th=1 on each side could create an easily removable full-height clamp.
 
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