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A paintbrush in the hand of an artist is a tool that creates beauty. The same paintbrush in the hand of a monkey is just a stick with hair on it. Don't be the monkey.
Just remember that in the past, some of that monkey art has sold for big $$$. I am currently trying to get the power button of my laptop unstuck from something under the plastic plate on top of it, and am using a slotted screwdriver to do it. I'm worried that whether I use a metal screwdriver or plastic spatula there is a pretty good chance I'll break that plate. Fortunately, I can power up my laptop by pushing on the plate itself...😁
 

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I think most remote shells were designed by monkeys. Seems like no two have the same fastening method. What's wrong with a couple screws under the batteries and slots at the other end to secure? Designers act like no one would every need to get into a remote.
 

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I could drop here my 2 cents from my past jobs in R&D Dept … there is a well known pressure from "bean counters", so dropping expensive metal components like screws always a must; second point - patents: mechanical solutions, like snaps, patenting, so you should look around to avoid future legal implications...also it's less vendors to assemble BOM...
 

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Just for the record, what were the differences?
The difference between the two Inteset codes, or the difference between the matching code and the actual DVR+ functions? I didn't see any similarities between the two Inteset codes at all. The other code must be for a completely different device.

Keep in mind the code I analyzed came from a different UEI remote with a slightly different button layout. So all of the differences may not apply to the Inteset. I'll list them if that's what you're talking about.

EDIT: I wish I had a better memory. Looks like I went through the same exact code analysis in this thread a few years ago. At least the results were the same both times.
 

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I may be having the most serious issues with my DVR+ that I've seen. This evening I was watching a recording when it started freezing up, then stopping and starting. The remote wouldn't work consistently, and when it did the action was delayed several seconds. I tried rebooting by unplugging the power cord and also by using the power button on the unit. While that did get the unit to reboot, the problems would come back several minutes later. The only difference I noticed as the reboot completed was that the rapidly flashing blue light continued its activity for a lot longer than in normally does. The internal HDD is at 1% capacity, and I only have a couple of recordings on it so I won't lose much if I have to reformat/replace it..

So now I have to consider several possibilities. One is the batteries in the remote. It's been a while since they needed changing, but I haven't seen the low battery indicator. Wally World is closed, so it will be morning before I can replace them. Another reason could be the internal HDD is really starting to crap out, which pushes up the need to get a replacement. The local Fry's doesn't carry the OEM, and the SSD's on Amazon are still about twice the price of an OEM drive so I'll be going that route if replacing the batteries in the remote don't work. Another possibly HDD problem could be errors on the drive, which could be fixed temporarily by reformatting it, though that's a band-aid solution.The third possibility is the worst case scenario: Twice daily reboots caused the problem, which means the DVR+ is going kaput. But before I write the obituary I would reinstall the 135R FW in the hopes that will fix it. So the troubleshooting order as I see it is reformatting the internal HDD, new remote batteries and then replacing the HDD. At least I have the old Philips DVDR as a backup.

EDIT: I deleted the recordings, ran checkdisk then reformatted the HDD. Unfortunately, though the DVR+ fixes any disk errors, it doesn't tell you if it found any. To test things I scheduled some recordings to run while I am asleep and will check them in the morning. But so far, things seem to be working OK.
 

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As I pointed many times here, only MHDD or VIctoria programs could help you with HDD what did develop bad sectors.
You must run any of those program (MHDD is preferable, as it run from DOS, it's self bootable CD or flash drive).
Also, the program would show a sector's map of the drives; where are slow sectors, bad sectors and how many of those.
Taking SMART data before and after Scan+Remap run would be helpful too.
 

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As I pointed many times here, only MHDD or VIctoria programs could help you with HDD what did develop bad sectors.
I understand what you are saying. But since this is an internal HDD I would have to remove it to test it. And for the $44 is costs to replace the drive it makes more sense to go that route, which I did this morning. I can always test it after it's replaced, and if it's not trashed I can throw it in an external drive enclosure and use it as a backup external drive for the DVR+. Not sure if I would trust it for anything that is too important.

For what it's worth, deleting the contents of the drive, running the DVR+ checkdisk tool and then reformatting seems to have fixed the problem. But if the drive is starting to fail, the problems will return. I've used Linux a bit, but it's not my go to OS. This morning I considered the possibility that the FAT system became corrupted, but since I'm not that familiar with Linux I can't say for sure. But if that's what happened, the drive is probably OK. Either way, after 5 years and constant use it can't hurt to replace the drive as a preventive maintenance routine.
 

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For what it's worth, deleting the contents of the drive, running the DVR+ checkdisk tool and then reformatting seems to have fixed the problem. But if the drive is starting to fail, the problems will return.
Get a hold of a USB to SATA adapter, like this one. Download gsmartcontrol which is a S.M.A.R.T. utility to read the error information from the drive's builtin diagnostics and error reporting and install it on a Windows computer. Remove the drive from the DVR+ and plug it into the adapter and then into the Windows computer—you don't have to format the drive for gsmartcontrol to read the S.M.A.R.T. data from the drive. If the drive has anything wrong with it, you'll get output like this:

3041997


and this:

3041998


The error log will contain more verbose info:

Code:
Complete error log:

SMART Extended Comprehensive Error Log Version: 1 (5 sectors)
Device Error Count: 178 (device log contains only the most recent 20 errors)
    CR     = Command Register
    FEATR  = Features Register
    COUNT  = Count (was: Sector Count) Register
    LBA_48 = Upper bytes of LBA High/Mid/Low Registers ]  ATA-8
    LH     = LBA High (was: Cylinder High) Register    ]   LBA
    LM     = LBA Mid (was: Cylinder Low) Register      ] Register
    LL     = LBA Low (was: Sector Number) Register     ]
    DV     = Device (was: Device/Head) Register
    DC     = Device Control Register
    ER     = Error register
    ST     = Status register
Powered_Up_Time is measured from power on, and printed as
DDd+hh:mm:SS.sss where DD=days, hh=hours, mm=minutes,
SS=sec, and sss=millisec. It "wraps" after 49.710 days.

Error 164 [3] occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 577 hours (24 days + 1 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER -- ST COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC
  -- -- -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --
  40 -- 51 00 00 00 00 09 b1 dd c0 00 00  Error: UNC at LBA = 0x09b1ddc0 = 162651584

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FEATR COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC  Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- == -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --  ---------------  --------------------
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:02:07.134  READ DMA EXT
  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04     00:02:07.025  NOP [Abort queued commands]
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:02:04.693  READ DMA EXT
  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04     00:02:04.507  NOP [Abort queued commands]
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:02:02.309  READ DMA EXT

Error 163 [2] occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 577 hours (24 days + 1 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER -- ST COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC
  -- -- -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --
  40 -- 51 00 00 00 00 09 b1 dd c0 00 00  Error: UNC at LBA = 0x09b1ddc0 = 162651584

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FEATR COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC  Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- == -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --  ---------------  --------------------
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:02:04.693  READ DMA EXT
  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04     00:02:04.507  NOP [Abort queued commands]
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:02:02.309  READ DMA EXT
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d1 20 e0 00     00:02:02.267  READ DMA EXT
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 c9 20 e0 00     00:02:02.248  READ DMA EXT

Error 162 [1] occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 577 hours (24 days + 1 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER -- ST COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC
  -- -- -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --
  40 -- 51 00 00 00 00 09 b1 dd c0 00 00  Error: UNC at LBA = 0x09b1ddc0 = 162651584

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FEATR COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC  Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- == -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --  ---------------  --------------------
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:02:02.309  READ DMA EXT
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d1 20 e0 00     00:02:02.267  READ DMA EXT
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 c9 20 e0 00     00:02:02.248  READ DMA EXT
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 c1 20 e0 00     00:02:02.134  READ DMA EXT
  25 00 00 00 40 00 00 00 80 93 c0 e0 00     00:02:02.122  READ DMA EXT

Error 161 [0] occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 577 hours (24 days + 1 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER -- ST COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC
  -- -- -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --
  40 -- 51 00 00 00 00 09 b1 dd c0 00 00  Error: UNC at LBA = 0x09b1ddc0 = 162651584

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FEATR COUNT  LBA_48  LH LM LL DV DC  Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- == -- == -- == == == -- -- -- -- --  ---------------  --------------------
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:01:44.294  READ DMA EXT
  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04     00:01:44.185  NOP [Abort queued commands]
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:01:41.886  READ DMA EXT
  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04     00:01:41.700  NOP [Abort queued commands]
  25 00 00 08 00 00 00 09 b1 d9 20 e0 00     00:01:39.447  READ DMA EXT

Error 160 [19] log entry is empty
Error 159 [18] log entry is empty
SMART Extended Self-test Log Version: 1 (1 sectors)
Num  Test_Description    Status                  Remaining  LifeTime(hours)  LBA_of_first_error
# 1  Short offline       Completed without error       00%       577         -
# 2  Vendor (0x50)       Completed without error       00%       577         -
# 3  Short offline       Completed without error       00%       577         -
# 4  Vendor (0x50)       Completed without error       00%         1         -
# 5  Short offline       Completed without error       00%         1         -
With the bad sectors reported, this particular drive is toast.

Then you can put a new drive—or the old one if it is okay—into an external enclosure and you won't have to take the DVR+ apart again. When the one drive reaches capacity, swap it for another one and keep going.
 

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With the bad sectors reported, this particular drive is toast
I wouldn't be so directive, usually current drives has 4096 bad sectors limit, so the 231 bad sectors level is low.
I would check the value once in a month to see its trend. For today, I wouldn't blame the drive for sure.

The program I did recommend many time here, it's good as basic tool. But MHDD/Victoria will give ability to make thorough scan and force to remap weak sectors too.
 

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Definitely off-topic, but this talk about disk utilities that scan and remap weak sectors reminds me of the original hard disk low-level format utility, Spin-Rite, a masterpiece of compact programming written (in assembler!) by one of the best programmers/columnists of the golden age (1980's) of PCs, Steve Gibson. I could go on and on about his utility and Steve's weekly columns in InfoWorld, but, again, it is way off-topic, so I'll leave it be. But it sure brings back fond memories of working with PCs when they (and us users) were in their infancy.
 

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Get a hold of a USB to SATA adapter, like this one. Download gsmartcontrol which is a S.M.A.R.T. utility to read the error information from the drive's builtin diagnostics and error reporting and install it on a Windows computer. Remove the drive from the DVR+ and plug it into the adapter and then into the Windows computer—you don't have to format the drive for gsmartcontrol to read the S.M.A.R.T. data from the drive.
The program I did recommend many time here, it's good as basic tool. But MHDD/Victoria will give ability to make thorough scan and force to remap weak sectors too.
Thanks for the suggestions. The OEM replacement I ordered wasn't supposed to arrive till next week, but it was on my doorstep at 7:00AM this morning before the porch pirates even wake up. Since the other night my DVR+ has been working flawlessly again, so the problem was either transient weirdness or something on the HDD got corrupted, but was fixed with the reformatting.

So at this point the plan is to switch the internal HDD out with the new drive. I have several SATA USB enclosures that I use for different OS configurations. I've also removed the screws from the drive caddie on my laptop for quick changes. At one point I looked at buying additional caddies so Switching from one Windows configuration to another, or even a Linux OS would be a matter of seconds. But the individual caddies from Dell were a bit high priced for me, which is why I went with USB enclosures. With the new drive in hand, I can troubleshoot the original drive at any time, and if it has a reasonable amount of life in it, use it as a backup external HDD. But the conundrum I am now confronted with is whether or not to switch the drives out and use the old drive as an external HDD and watch the 10 hours of programming already on it. Or watch the recordings and switch the drives out between scheduled recordings. I can't see the job taking more than 30 minutes to do

EDIT: I just switched out the old drive for the new drive in the DVR+. Simple, straightforward and took about 15 minutes to do, which included getting and putting away the tools (1 Phillips screwdriver). The hardest part was breaking through the seal which voided my already expired warranty. For some reason there is always psychological angst when I do that. Formatted the drive and it was ready to go. One disappointment, though. I put the original drive in a NexStar SX.drive enclosure and plugged it in. The DVR+ wanted to format it, even though it was using it less than 10 minutes before it was removed. I really expected the DVR+ to recognize it as a compatible, ready to go drive because of that. So now I will have to wait until 3 or 4 movies come back around on Movies! and record them again, or switch the drives out some time in the future to watch them. For what it's worth, the low battery indicator showed up this afternoon. So whether the problem I experienced the other day was the drive, the remote or just something transient remains a mystery.
 

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Thanks for the suggestions. The OEM replacement I ordered wasn't supposed to arrive till next week, but it was on my doorstep at 7:00AM this morning before the porch pirates even wake up. Since the other night my DVR+ has been working flawlessly again, so the problem was either transient weirdness or something on the HDD got corrupted, but was fixed with the reformatting.

So at this point the plan is to switch the internal HDD out with the new drive. I have several SATA USB enclosures that I use for different OS configurations. I've also removed the screws from the drive caddie on my laptop for quick changes. At one point I looked at buying additional caddies so Switching from one Windows configuration to another, or even a Linux OS would be a matter of seconds. But the individual caddies from Dell were a bit high priced for me, which is why I went with USB enclosures. With the new drive in hand, I can troubleshoot the original drive at any time, and if it has a reasonable amount of life in it, use it as a backup external HDD. But the conundrum I am now confronted with is whether or not to switch the drives out and use the old drive as an external HDD and watch the 10 hours of programming already on it. Or watch the recordings and switch the drives out between scheduled recordings. I can't see the job taking more than 30 minutes to do

EDIT: I just switched out the old drive for the new drive in the DVR+. Simple, straightforward and took about 15 minutes to do, which included getting and putting away the tools (1 Phillips screwdriver). The hardest part was breaking through the seal which voided my already expired warranty. For some reason there is always psychological angst when I do that. Formatted the drive and it was ready to go. One disappointment, though. I put the original drive in a NexStar SX.drive enclosure and plugged it in. The DVR+ wanted to format it, even though it was using it less than 10 minutes before it was removed. I really expected the DVR+ to recognize it as a compatible, ready to go drive because of that. So now I will have to wait until 3 or 4 movies come back around on Movies! and record them again, or switch the drives out some time in the future to watch them. For what it's worth, the low battery indicator showed up this afternoon. So whether the problem I experienced the other day was the drive, the remote or just something transient remains a mystery.
One advantage of using an external drive(s) is you can swap them out and use @pachinko's DVR+ Lister to pull the recordings off the drive and place them on another drive to view them either with your TV—if it has a builtin media player—or on a computer. You don't have to lose the recordings.
 

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One advantage of using an external drive(s) is you can swap them out and use @pachinko's DVR+ Lister to pull the recordings off the drive and place them on another drive to view them either with your TV—if it has a builtin media player—or on a computer. You don't have to lose the recordings.
I was thinking the same thing, but also had an idea when I had the DVR+ cracked open. With a Dremel tool and a little bit of Ingenuity I could put a small hole in the left side or the top of the DVR+, then run a male/female SATA cable through it and connect the male end to the DVR+ connection, and the female end to the HDD. To fit the cable, the hole would probably have to be two half circles, one on the bottom half of the case and one on the top half that forms the circle when they are back together. Then I would have the best of both worlds: An "internal" HDD on the outside of the case that could be switched out at any time when the DVR+ is powered down. With all the warranties now expired, doing the surgery is moot anyway as far as the warranty goes. The question is, does anyone make a male/female extension cord for SATA drives? If they do, it would be a very short pit stop to switch drives out--10 seconds or so. You'd probably want some kind of a grommet to line the hole so the cable doesn't get damaged by the metal on the bottom of the case or jagged plastic on the top.
 

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I was thinking the same thing, but also had an idea when I had the DVR+ cracked open. With a Dremel tool and a little bit of Ingenuity I could put a small hole in the left side or the top of the DVR+, then run a male/female SATA cable through it and connect the male end to the DVR+ connection, and the female end to the HDD. To fit the cable, the hole would probably have to be two half circles, one on the bottom half of the case and one on the top half that forms the circle when they are back together. Then I would have the best of both worlds: An "internal" HDD on the outside of the case that could be switched out at any time when the DVR+ is powered down. With all the warranties now expired, doing the surgery is moot anyway as far as the warranty goes. The question is, does anyone make a male/female extension cord for SATA drives? If they do, it would be a very short pit stop to switch drives out--10 seconds or so. You'd probably want some kind of a grommet to line the hole so the cable doesn't get damaged by the metal on the bottom of the case or jagged plastic on the top.
Is there some reason you don’t want to use an external USB drive? You don’t need to completely power down the DVR+ to disconnect it (there’s a built-in eject procedure) and the “hole” is already there. You can convert a SATA drive to USB with a simple SATA to USB cable from Star Tech like this one.
 

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Is there some reason you don’t want to use an external USB drive? You don’t need to completely power down the DVR+ to disconnect it (there’s a built-in eject procedure) and the “hole” is already there. You can convert a SATA drive to USB with a simple SATA to USB cable from Star Tech like this one.
If I saved recordings to watch multiple times I would consider using one. But once I watch something I usually delete it immediately afterwards. I also like the slim, compact footprint of the DVR+ and would rather not have any peripherals hanging off of it. Then there is the factor of having to tweak it so it doesn't constantly spin or consume power. With an internal drive all that is taken care of.
 

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I also like the slim, compact footprint of the DVR+ and would rather not have any peripherals hanging off of it.
A lot of folks went with the internal-drive DVR+ model for that very reason. But if you add an eSATA cable, you eliminate that advantage.

Sounds like what you really want is an HDD dock built right into the DVR+ case so you can just slide the drive in and out as desired. IIRC, @P Smith posted an idea on how to do that many moons ago.
Then there is the factor of having to tweak it so it doesn't constantly spin or consume power. With an internal drive all that is taken care of.
I'm pretty sure the internal drive always spins. 2.5" drives only use a watt or two, but if you want to save that power, you'll need an external drive or dock that can be configured to spin down after a few minutes of inactivity (or an SSD, which doesn't spin at all).
 

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A lot of folks went with the internal-drive DVR+ model for that very reason. But if you add an eSATA cable, you eliminate that advantage.

Sounds like what you really want is an HDD dock built right into the DVR+ case so you can just slide the drive in and out as desired. IIRC, @P Smith posted an idea on how to do that many moons ago.
True. You would lose the slim and compact advantage. But you would gain the advantage of not having to reformat your internal drive to use as an external drive. So you are correct about the dock. In looking at the inside of the DVR+ I think they could have done it in two different configurations. One would have been to rotate the HDD connection 90* clockwise with HDD entry on the left side of the case. The second would have been to put a hinged trap door/removable plate on the bottom plate where the HDD currently sits. Either way would have given access to the internal HDD without cracking open the case.

I'm pretty sure the internal drive always spins. 2.5" drives only use a watt or two, but if you want to save that power, you'll need an external drive or dock that can be configured to spin down after a few minutes of inactivity (or an SSD, which doesn't spin at all).
It's not so much the electricity usage, it's the wear and tear factor on a drive that is always spinning. The internal HDD always spins when the DVR+ is on, but shuts down a few minutes after it goes into standby. I seriously thought about getting the SSD, but it was about $100 vs. the $44 for the OEM replacement and I just couldn't justify it. However, if I was also looking for a HDD for my computer I would have spent the extra money and if it didn't work in the DVR+ I would have schlepped it over the the computer.

Today was actually interesting because when I checked the DVR+ I saw that it had an initialization problem with the new HDD. I tried reformatting it, but it looks like there is a problem with the drive itself. The DVR+ even went through the routine of rebooting and trying to finish the initialization process, but without success. So the original drive is back in and working fine. It's strange because last night I recorded several programs without any problems. So it goes back to Amazon for exchange on Monday.

I'll also throw in a few observations I made while doing all this. One is that if you remove the case you need to push the power button lever out from the inside so that the tip that actually presses the button locks back against the metal tab on the top half of the case. If you don't, the button won't seat properly and will be inoperative. Another is that there are more LED sockets available next to the familiar blue/red LED we all know and love. I wonder what other devices use this PCB version, and what they are for? Another observation is that the two tuners seem to be very small--if they are located in the silver box attached to the RF connector. I expected something about twice that size. In a way I was a bit surprised at how simple and compact the DVR+ is on the inside: 1 smaller than expected PCB/motherboard and an HDD. As a computer, it's smaller that a lot of tablets. And finally, the plastic snap case that fits around the edges of the internal HDD is something that would be nice to have multiples of. That in and of itself would make switching out HDD's quicker; keep one on any HDD you use and just slide it in when needed. If I had 2 or 3 of those I probably wouldn't even put all the screws back in the case when I reassembled it--just like on all my old computers after I got used to them. When I first started using computers I would lay out all the screws in the patter that matched the case. After a while I'd leave most of them out and use just enough to hold the case in place. I think manufacturers also wised up, because they went to thumb screws and then spring loaded sliding catches that required no tools at all to open the case.
 

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If I saved recordings to watch multiple times I would consider using one. But once I watch something I usually delete it immediately afterwards. I also like the slim, compact footprint of the DVR+ and would rather not have any peripherals hanging off of it. Then there is the factor of having to tweak it so it doesn't constantly spin or consume power. With an internal drive all that is taken care of.
You could always mount the device behind the TV or stand:

3042882


The blue USB cable for the drive is an right angle M-F extension cable so I don't have to pull the connector from the back of the DVR+ when I swap out the drive. If I need to remove the DVR+, I push it to the right in the pic, remove the cables, then push it to the left and lift it out. The IR extender runs under the top of the stand to the front of the top shelf.

Once the DVR+ goes into standby the external drive spins down to conserve power and wear on the drive. The USB interface is still powered on to facilitate rapid spin up of the drive. Remember also that the DVR+ never really turns off unless you pull the plug on it. Pressing the 'Off' button on the remote turns off the video output and the device goes into 'Inactive Standby'. If the blue indicator on the front is dim, it is in 'Inactive Standby'.
 
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