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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the early stages of upgrading my HT system and I think I have decided on a Panasonic SA-HE100K for my receiver. It's gotten great reviews and seems to be a really good value. Currently, I'm using an old "surround sound in a box" system and am planning on using the old speakers for the time being. I'm mainly buying the new receiver for the switching capabilities and am aware that the old speakers won't be the best, but they may have to do.


My concern (I'm not really on top of these things) is the amp may be too powerful. The speakers are labeled as such:


2 L-R mains - 8ohm, 30 watts

1 center - 8ohms, 30 watts

2 rear - 8ohms, 15 watts


These always seemed adequate for my room size, by will they work OK with the amp I mentioned?


Thanks again... :)
 

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Generally speaking, you can't have too much power. You should be fine if you don't exceed your previous listening levels. If you decided to really crank it up, I would imagine you could blow a woofer or two. Your new amp may trick you into playing louder because the sound is most likely going to be improved. :)


Terry
 

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You will usually have more problems with not enough power and clipping the amplifier trying to get decent volume. Also remember that those ratings are RMS (continuous). Most speakers will handle much more transient power (Peak). Remember that for each 3db increase in sound, wattage requirements double.


Seriously, if the speakers are reasonably efficient (90+db @ 1W input) You will be able to EASILY get 100db+ peak SPL and still be within the 30W CONTINUOUS rating. If you figure they will handle 60W peak, you can get around 108db peaks and only be using
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by srgilbert
That sounds reasonable, thanks, anybody have a second opinion?
I second Terry's answer - you won't have problems with a "too powerful" amp.


Speakers are more likely damaged by under-powered amps that are driven into clipping. The resultant distortion is deadly

to speakers.


Dr. Gregory Greenman

Physicist
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you gentlemen, just what I wanted to hear. I'm sure I will be asking advice on new speaker selection a few months down the road.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by bpape
Also, surrounds rarely get as much juice as the fronts and sub. Just set the rears for small. Assuming a 2 way system, about 70-80% of the power is delivered to the woofer. However, when you clip the amp, it generates TONS of HIGH FREQUENCY energy. That is why you blow tweeters with low powered amps/receivers. If you are blowing woofers, you have other problems (bass cranked too high, high capacitance cabling, etc.)
I've never blown a speaker or driver, but it is my understanding that underpowered (clipped) speakers blow tweeters and overpowered (clopped? :p )speakers blow woofers, generally speaking of course.


Terry
 
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