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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
 http://content.health.msn.com/conten.../95/103226.htm


Here is a interesting read about Children and hearing loss from children movies..Read it and post your opinions.I would agree with most of it,and it's especially interesting since i'm a construction worker, and My standards for safety are more than childrens.


brickie
 

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Glad to see 140 db is considered the threshold for trouble....even my system doesn't go that high (though I've never tried :D)...


Good article.
 

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I like the article, but it is evident that no commercial theater, even an IMAX theater can generate enough SPL to cause either temporary or permanent hearing loss. "There is no standard for entertainment exposure levels," was quoted and that is very true in post-production screening rooms like Skywalker Ranch and of course concerts. I never practice safe sound in our theater, if it is not 170dB it is not worth hearing. I feel bass and surround effects along with the eupherisms children can't get are added to film to attract adults as well.
 

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But you missed the main point that OSHA has this max standard of 140 dB for immediate hearing damage. The important point is that hearing loss can also occur with prolonged exposure as stated "15 minutes or more above 100 dB". Many of us have theaters that are capable of putting out over 100dB of noise and yes you are doing damage to your hearing over time.
 

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I have wanted to secretly sneak my SPL meter into both a commercial theater and IMAX theater to measure SPL. I doubt any cinema gets to the 100dB range.
 

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I always heard that 90db was the accepted maximum level for most machines.

I always thought kids were doing damage to their ears by listening to walkmans on subways since they would have to turn it up beyond 90db.

I imagine at 140db people pass out.
 

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While I don't always practice what I'm about to preach, Anything above 80db is supposed to be bad and cumulative. If I'm remembering correctly, 130db is the threshold of pain.

I don't think I'd like to hear a sustained 130+db anytime in the near future.


All though I always like My music and movie sounds turned up loud, I find (as I grow older) that My foolishness in youth has come with some costs.


Please be carefull with your hearing......And someone get that &%*#@%$ Ringing phone.......Oh, Sorry!! ;)


Tall Shadow
 

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Huh?;)
 

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I have to say that I have been angered more than once at my local theater with sound levels that were so high that my kids complained. The worst offender is the dreaded THX trailer (though recently this seems to have been toned down a bit).


I love being able to set levels to reasonable listening levels in my HT ... yet another reason my local theater get's very little business from us anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm going to agree that most theaters are way too loud..Not necessarily compalining,but my favorite even makes me and my wife cringe at times.. We only go about 2-3 times a year.I do believe you need to be careful with your hearing!It is permanent damage!!!I lost quite abit of mine in 1 ear..Not related to home theater,but I do know from experience how precious it is.Be careful guys.


brickie
 

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I agree, they can do some things to improve hearing, but if you are in threshold for a sustained period of time then even hearing aids are in vain. One thing I wanted to say was that if theater sound (residential or commercial) is clean, from from distortion and clipping and music, dailog and effects sound articulate and lifelike, then it can be loud and enjoyable. I know the sound system at IMAX theaters have that unfatigued, loud, but clear sound. I think the key to practicing safe sound is to use common sense and judgment. For short periods in a home screening room, or rock concert it would be acceptable. I lost some of my hearing when I was active military, but I have enough to still crank up good audio.
 
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