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Morning All,


One of the things that can be difficult for a non-professional is deciding to make effort and investing in a calibration system for a given budget. The system for a non-professional (i.e. one for in-home personal use only) is that they need to find a probe and software that works best for their imaging system and environment. I am one such consumer looking to determine what


I am no different as I am such a consumer looking for such a recommendation for my particular setup for what I am willing to invest ($, not time). My setup is a near completely light controlled space with dark-ish walls, ceiling, and floor. I am using front projection (JVC DLA-RS20) and acoustically transparent screen (Seymour Center Stage XD).


The primary use of this environment is Blu-ray. It is understood that over time the hours will accumulate on the lamp and the color shifting will occur (in addition to the light output dropping). But, I do not wish to have to arrange visits from a professional if I can learn the basics with a minimal amount of time and $ being involved.


So, based on the information, and say a budget of around $300 (arbitrary $ to get the discussion going) what would be the recommendation as a starting point?
 

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Well I am just a avid browser of this forum and have paid $400 for my 5 year old projector to be calibrated by a pro so here is my take:

You have high end equipment, you say don't want to spend a lot of time, then why buy anything? Just pay the pro and have a good job done correctly the first time, then sit back and enjoy.


If you have read any of the post about calibration, you would know it is VERY time consuming to even get a handle on the process, let along get it done correctly. A basic user level calibration disk is about all that is of value with your time restraints.


That said, I would like to know if low end equipment is worth the money for anything other than tinkering, considering the inaccuracies.
 

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I would say it is a worthy endevor to learn how to do it yourself.... if you appreciate the difference and especially since you are using a projector. However I will say you are going have to spend time to learn how to do it. I would say probably 10 hours total of fooling around with it to get some idea of what your doing.... especially if you play with the CMS to get your saturation/colors set correctly.


Projectors colors/grayscale drift quite dramatically overtime as the bulb ages (or replacement etc...). So it needs to be tuned up over time.


I've paid $400 to have my display ISF calibrated and it was worth every penny. But with a projector I just didn't feel it was worth it due to the dramatic drift over time. Knowing my luck I would have it calibrated and then have the bulb go out a week later.... making my calibration practically useless.



This is the article that inspired me to learn how to do it. Doing grayscale is pretty straight forward.... doing color with the CMS is a bit more tricky/involved.

http://www.curtpalme.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=10457
 

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Greetings


Most calibrators are pretty flexible when it comes to bulbs going out. Just find one that provides a warranty and things like bulbs are covered ... get a new bulb and he comes back for no additional charge ...


One just needs to ask ... rather than assume they won't come back or that you are SOL. (All my clients are covered for a year ... and then recalibration costs are very nominal ... 30 to 40% of the original charge.)


regards
 

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Just to say that I found it a very long learning process, that while it is nice to know and understand what is going on when calibrating, if you can afford a pro (and don't plan on making big changes in the near future to your setup) then from what Michael says above a good calibrator will look after you.


I eventually managed to understand the steps, the adjustments and what the various graphs meant. Then I found out that my i1LT probably wasn't very accurate, so despite having almost 'perfect' greyscale, gamma and gamut it turned out that my results were some way off. In the end I rented an i1Pro sensor and rechecked everything (seeing as I'd learnt enough by then and had the software) and found my i1LT was off by a delta E of 7 compared to the rental meter's calibration.
So this is the kind of thing you can be up against even if you manage to get a hold on what you need to do (and I'm sure I'm only just getting to grips with doing it after over 2 years).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelvin1965S
Just to say that I found it a very long learning process, that while it is nice to know and understand what is going on when calibrating, if you can afford a pro (and don't plan on making big changes in the near future to your setup) then from what Michael says above a good calibrator will look after you.


I eventually managed to understand the steps, the adjustments and what the various graphs meant. Then I found out that my i1LT probably wasn't very accurate, so despite having almost 'perfect' greyscale, gamma and gamut it turned out that my results were some way off. In the end I rented an i1Pro sensor and rechecked everything (seeing as I'd learnt enough by then and had the software) and found my i1LT was off by a delta E of 7 compared to the rental meter's calibration.
So this is the kind of thing you can be up against even if you manage to get a hold on what you need to do (and I'm sure I'm only just getting to grips with doing it after over 2 years).
how is the difference showing up to you.. DO find the picture of the ipro better. I would guess that you profiled the i1LT as well? did you do this?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by richlo /forum/post/19568523


how is the difference showing up to you.. DO find the picture of the ipro better. I would guess that you profiled the i1LT as well? did you do this?

I found the picture slightly brighter and more detailed, which I guess might be due to the i1LT over reading the red, so now I have the green set higher to achieve the correct greyscale. As I felt more confident in the i1Pro I spent more time fine tuning, so I've got the very low IREs spot on so my gamma is nice and flat at 2.3, with a tiny lowering below 10IRE towards 2.2. Of course the i1Pro is better suited to CMS work than the i1LT, so that helped me nail the VideoEQ CMS settings, which also improves the image.


I recently saw the new JVC X7 in (uncalibrated) THX mode and it had black crush and therefore less shadow detail, plus the lower gamma of THX (2.2 or maybe less as it wasn't calibrated). It didn't seem an improvement setup like this and we're talking about a projector with maybe 70,000:1 cr compared to 30,000:1 so it showed me the value of a good calibration.


PS. I did profile the i1LT, but it still didn't measure as well as the i1Pro for the colour gamut, though the gamma measurment was good even before the profiling, which is useful to know. The greyscale measured pretty close to the i1Pro with the offset (in Chromapure) applied.
 
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