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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is up with this projector? I thought that it was supposed to be out soon, or at least talked about?


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David Mendicino
 

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I spoke with them -- the current expected release date is November 15. It will probably take a while after that for info and reviews to trickle in.


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Chip
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm...I am very surprised....this thing looks like it may be a real winner, yet there is very little discussion, even theoretical, on it.
 

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I agree, David, that it is strange that this one isn't talked about more.


Maybe not many folks have seen it...:(
 

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I think that's it -- nobody has seen it. Some discussion now and again, but not one "witness." Delayed release and not seen = maybe not ready?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well..I forgot the link...check the chrisite web sight..

however, this seems to be THE option...


D-ila....high contrast, 11lb, SHP bulb...so maybe not same colour reporduction as xenon, but much quiter, and apparantly lighter in weight...


to me, this seems to be the ultimate...
 

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Other than 20% more lumens, the Christie sounds nearly identical to the Hitachi CP-SX5500W, which (I'd heard) was supposed to be out this month. Any other advantages?
 

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Saw the Vivid Red at the Professional Products technology fair this week in Greenbelt, Md. The projector is not yet ready to roll out, so it still had tweaks to be worked out (some are amusing: a remote control button was labeled "manu" instead of "menu").


Given it is a "work-in-progress", I was impressed with the quality of the picture, especially coming from such a small-sized projector. And as always with LCOS (D-ILA) systems: "pixels, what pixels?"


It was a pleasure to meet Frank Weathers of Christie Digital. The man knows his stuff!


I went to the show to get some more ideas on upgrading my Vidikron Crystal One-based home theatre, since the Sharp 9000 didn't work for me.


Speaking of the show, I also finally got to meet Tom Stites of JVC in person -- another class act, who was very helpful as usual.
 

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The colours don't have to be bad, but you will lose more lumens to obtain accurate colour because the bulb will put out less red light. With proper calibration the advantages of DVI make the unit really appealing, in theory. :) I hope the contrast ratio is up with current units.


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Kam Fung
 

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Kam,


If anything - it won't be the "red", but the

"blue" that will be somewhat deficient.


The double-edged sword advantage of the Xenon

bulb is that it is hotter than the others. While

this causes problems in terms of cooling and

noisy fans - it also results in a higher color

temperature.


The "white" light spectrum coming from this

higher color temperature is richer in blues and

purple and other colors in the high frequency

part of the visible spectrum.


To remember the order of the colors in the

spectrum, physicists use a little memory aid -

they just remember the "name" Roy G. Biv.


The spectrum, in order, is Red, Orange, Yellow,

Green, Blue, Indigo, and Violet - from low

frequency [ red ] to high frequency [ violet ].


The hotter something is - the higher in the

spectrum it radiates. If you heat something

until it just barely glows - it will glow red.

If you go higher in temperature, it will glow

orange or yellow. If you go high enough so that

it also radiates the blues, and violets - then

you will have all the frequencies of the spectrum,

and the object will be "white hot".


Dr. Gregory Greenman

Physicist
 

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Ah ah ah, not so fast. Being a physicist won't save you from being mistaken this time. :)


What you say is very true for incandescent bulbs, including Xenon bulbs. Obviously, there are some efficiency issues with these bulbs and new technology has moved in a different direction.


The spectrum of an incandescent bulb is very even without many high peaks or valleys, UHP bulbs and the like behave more like flourescent bulbs and have very peaky spectrums.


I believe as efficiency increases, the colour temperature rises and, as you say, you get a larger proportion of blue light or a paucity of red light.


Xenon bulbs have, I believe, a colour temperature of around 5500K, close to the 6500K standard. The CCT of more exotic bulbs like UHP are much higher and to get them back to 6500K you need to sacrifice a lot of blue and some green light.


Hopefully someone more familiar with bulb technology will comment on the technical details.


Regards,


Kam Fung
 
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