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Hell Everyone,


I am wondering if anyone knows how much of an impact the quality of coaxial cables have on HDTV signal strength.


There are currently 3 TVs using the same cable feed (2 HDTVs and 1 standard digital as well as high speed internet.)


Now last week when I purchased myself a new HDTV, HDTV cablebox and speaker set I had problems with many channels, some not coming in, others get scrambled up / distorted.


Changing the coaxial cable from an older skinnier one to a more recent fatter one from the splitter to my cable box resolved many of the issues, but this wire is not long enough to properly 'hide' in the house. So I replaced it with another I had stored but then again I am having some issues with reception but to a lesser extent.



Basically my question is, will buying a gold-plated coaxial cable have a good chance of improving the quality even more?


Is it rare that a coaxial cable can effect reception so much?


Is there something possibly wrong I should know about?


Ive got a hdmi connection from the hdtv box to the tv


Thanks for the insight.
 

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What you describe as "skinny older coax" sounds like RG-59 which is relatively lossy and IMO should not be used for long cable runs. RG-6 is lower loss coax per foot than RG-59, but is larger Outside diameter. For long cable runs, I highly recommend the RG-6. Also, if you're simply splitting the signal between multiple terminations (i.e., TV receivers), then you should consider using a distribution amp. A 2-way splitter will divide the power by 3.5 dB. A 3-way splitter divides the power 3-ways with greater signal loss. This combined with the lossy RG-59 is probably why you're having troubles. IMO gold-plated coax is a waste of money, somewhat akin to buying monster cable for better audio sound. My ear can't tell the difference between the grossly overpriced monster cable and standard 16 AWG speaker cord.

Is it rare for coax cable (I presume you're referring to RG-59) to affect the signal? No. Typically RG-59 cables are kept short (about 6 FT max) like between a VCR and a TV or between a TV and a cable wall jack, and RG-6 is used for longer runs between the antenna and the receivers because it has lower loss per foot than the 59.
 

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Keep in mind that the effects of cable quality are directly related to the length of the cable. It would take a exceptionally crappy cable to have the effects you describe if were 10 to 20 feet. Quality becomes important at 100 or more feet as a really rough generalization. What might be more important is who put on the connectors. An amature connector installation can quickly turn premium cable to trash. The difference between RG59 and RG6 is small at lengths under 100 feet or so, all else being equal.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightHawk /forum/post/12861228


.... What might be more important is who put on the connectors. An amature connector installation can quickly turn premium cable to trash...l.

So true, so true.


And all it takes is to pull a loop too tight and damage the dielectric and a premium cable will be ruined.
 
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