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Hey guys, I’m trying to hook my cable lines back up. Current setup is the cable line connected to one coax going to our guest room. I did this just to get our internet hooked up and I knew I could move my modem later.

All other lines at some point had been cut. Fortunately all lines are long enough that I can put the coax connectors on the ends and still use them. But here’s my question, what splitter do I get? I thought I’d read somewhere that a splitter with like 2000 MHz was what you look for. But then I read today on the Xfinity forums that the 5-1000 MHz was what you need.

For now, I’m mainly focused on making sure a line in the basement is working so I can move the modem and router. So cable internet is the service in mind. But I want to hook all lines up should we in the future get satellite service or even cable through Xfinity.

I’ve tried to read on these splitters and now I come to you wonderful people. I’ve read about MHz. I’ve read about signal loss. I’m looking at the very least a 4 way splitter, maybe even 5 or 6 to cover different rooms. Do I need to just get one splitter to cover most rooms with television in some form (antenna, cable, satellite) and just keep a separate line for internet?
 

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https://www.amazon.com/Splitter-Bro...MXESVYTGC1Q&psc=1&refRID=CVGEDNBK7MXESVYTGC1Q




https://www.amazon.com/Premium-Coax...MXESVYTGC1Q&psc=1&refRID=CVGEDNBK7MXESVYTGC1Q




Use the two-way connect the coax feed from the provider to the input.
Use one output from the two-way to go directly to the cable modem.
Use the other output from the two-way and connect to the input of the four-way.
Connect the outputs of the four-way to the additional rooms/TV's.


If you have issues with the rooms/sets "after" the four-way, you may want to consider a "distribution amp/splitter".


Without details (type of coax, length of runs, connectors, wall plates, etc. ), this is just a starting point.
 

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Note that Ratman's recommendations are specifically designed with a controlled "Reverse Isolation", "Port-To-Port Isolation" and not TOO MUCH attenuation in the MoCa Band (~ 1500 MHz Band) so that signals can be exchanged (two-way) between Cable Boxes using the "Whole House" feature so that you can watch something recorded on a different cable box.

Portions of this higher frequency band are also used for streaming various Media Files from PC ( Game Station or File Server) to BD/UD-Player, using DLNA network protocols. Since exchanges are two-way, it is inevitable that signals will likely have to go via a REVERSE Path on some (or several in my case) RF Splitters.

I had to sort through my stock of "standard" CATV [5-1000 MHz] and SAT [2000+ MHz] 2-Port Cable RF Splitters to eliminate those that had too much Isolation before I could get my Whole House DVR's to talk to each other.
 
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