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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to find a source for inexpensive color coded cables, such as the ones with the purple RCA plugs used for a subwoofer or orange for digital coax audio. I've used monoprice.com several times, but it does not appear they have colored RCA plugs on any coax cables, at least not that I've found.


I need to get a few cables & figured might as well get color coded versions. I've done some searching & they are available, but at about 10 times the cost of a generic black monoprice one. I know I can color a plug with paint/marker/etc., but thought I'd ask first in case anyone knew of a cost effective source for what I'm looking for.


Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Another option is to use component video cables which will have red, green and blue RCA connectors. You can seperate the cables individually if you wish.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...t=1#largeimage


They make premium style cables too, which cost more.
http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...t=1#largeimage


And if you need two more colors just get their premium stereo cables which are quite nice and can be seperated too.
http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2


Or composite cables which will have a red, white and yellow connector. RG59
http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2
 

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Or you could get some colored sticky-tape and wrap it around the ends of the cables.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Currently I'm using a couple sets of component cables & several Red/White audio cables, along with some optical audio and S-Video ones. Am also using a yellow video cable for digital audio, and a plain black for the subwoofer. So I'd like to have something different & preferably of the proper color.


The subwoofer cable is a real cheap monoprice one and is causing a small problem. When I turn off the A/V receiver the cable is picking up hum from the subwoofer power cord, and you can hear this in the sub until it powers down. Moving the cheap cable away from the power cord does make a difference, but there is only so much room to re-arrange things. Since it needs replacing I figured why not go with the proper purple color.


Parts Express has some colored ones that are priced in between Blue Jeans and monoprice, and I'll have to look at their listings more carefully to see all that they offer. Otherwise it's colored sticky-tape!
 

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A different cable may not help with your hum issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman /forum/post/18174908


A different cable may not help with your hum issue.

I don't recall having a hum problem until I installed the cheap cable which is very thin. The previous cable was really too short & was routed exposed to viewing to the subwoofer, so it's difficult to say whether the cable made a difference or the routing to the sub made a difference. But if I do move the cheap cable away from the power cord the hum does decrease significantly. So I'm presuming it's poor shielding that's causing the problem. Unfortunately I do not have a better quality cable that is long enough to try out.
 

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Mike,


Unfortunately, running a signal cable parallel to a power line usually results in hum, as you've found. Even higher quality RCA audio cables have this problem -- that cable design really has no shielding. The outside "shield" actually is the "signal return" or "reference". Power line frequencies picked up in the outer conductor are quite audible.


You should run RCA signal cables as far away from 60Hz power lines as possible, and not parallel to them. If they have to pass by one another, they should cross one another perpendicularly.


Minimizing power line pickup is one of the primary reasons for using XLR cables.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Selden,


I am aware about keeping signal & power cables away from each other. But this is the first time I've experienced a problem, probably because I do keep them separated. The subwoofer cable is quite long & I have to coil or bunch it up somewhere, so I did this behind the sub where there was plenty of room. Of course there's a power cord back there & I tried to position the cables to avoid a problem.


There is no hum when the system is on probably because the sub cable is grounded or terminated properly at the A/V receiver. The hum occurs when you turn off the receiver & the cable is picking up the 60 Hz signal from the sub's power cord, and feeding the hum into the sub. Once the sub powers off then there is no hum. So I did not notice the problem at first. There is only a couple minutes where you can hear the hum & it's not that loud - but it's there. I used a sound level meter & re-positioned the sub cable for minimum hum & I don't think most people would even detect it unless the room was perfectly quiet.


I thought that one of those RG59 subwoofer cables would have better shielding & kill the hum completely, along with proper routing of course.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike99 /forum/post/18178472


The subwoofer cable is quite long & I have to coil or bunch it up somewhere, so I did this behind the sub where there was plenty of room.

By coiling the cable, you made a big inductor. I suspect that may be part of your hum problem, especially if the hum gradually fades out after the power is shut off.


As a test, try uncoiling it and spread it out somewhere away from the other cables and wires to see what happens. Better yet would be to replace the subwoofer cable with one of a length that doesn't leave excess loops. If you go with a real shielded cable, so much the better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoboRay /forum/post/18179598


By coiling the cable, you made a big inductor. I suspect that may be part of your hum problem, especially if the hum gradually fades out after the power is shut off.


As a test, try uncoiling it and spread it out somewhere away from the other cables and wires to see what happens. Better yet would be to replace the subwoofer cable with one of a length that doesn't leave excess loops. If you go with a real shielded cable, so much the better.

The coil was about a loop & a half. The hum does not gradually fade but stays the same level until the subwoofer turns itself off. Right now the irregular shaped "coil" is about 10" from the sub's power cord. As I lift the coax the hum decreases even more. But it doesn't look good hanging 3' up the wall!
 
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