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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Sony KE32TS2E plasma. I have calibrated the best I can with Avia, video essensials and my eyes, but i'm a bit stuck when it comes to colour temperature without the right equipment. According to the service menu notes on the back of a schematic diagram (not sure if the dealer was meant to give me that, it was in the bag with the manual), Cool is 10000k, Normal is 8000k and Warm is 6500k assuming it was calibrated correctly in the factory. According to the service menu, Warm (Low) is R +24, G 00, B -14 and Normal (Middle) is R +6, G 00, B +24. Warm makes white look slightly reddish, like mid day sun, is this the correct setting to use?
 

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Yup. The only way to know if it is accurately calibrated is to measure it with test instruments. When properly set, the light output of the display should track the correct color temperature from dark to white.


6500k is the standard for NTSC greyscale calibration. I do not know what PAL says, but I suspect is the same. It will look redder than 8000k. 10000k is way blue. Most TV's sold today are set way, way bluer than they should be.


Why do they do this?


Well, by making the greyscale way too blue, it gives the appearance of things being "whiter than white", which is the same reason little-old ladies put blue stuff in their hair.


Since that skews the colors of everything, they add in the dreaded red push, and gimmicks like "fleshtone correction." Add in a hefty dose of sharpening to add false edges to everything, and a big over dose of contrast.


Why? Well, when joe consumer walks into mega-mart and looks at a wall of TV's, he's going to by the one that looks sharper and brighter and more colorful than the rest. They *know* how to sell TV's and accuracy does not sell TV's on the showroom floor.
 

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A lot of people don't like 6500K for the same reason as you. There's nothing to keep you

from making it a tad cooler. Even though it says 6500K, you won't know unless you

have the set calibrated. It may be closer to 6000K. Set it to what your eyes like. :) I assume

you can tweak R, G, and B individually.


larry
 

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Yup, I agree with Larry. It's good to see what the standard looks like, but there's no law that says you have to go with it. If 6,500K looks too warm after a period of adjustment, then simply go to a cooler setting and enjoy. Thus far we don't have an ISF police knocking at our door. I've had 2 HDTVs calibrated by ISF techs and I wound up going back to my settings on both.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's food for thought, thanks again! There are a couple of user settings where you can adjust R G and B. I'll experiment and see what a setting between normal and warm looks like - something like R +12, G 00 B -6.
 

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Just a nitpicking note ... isn't "cooler" in the case of display temperature or color lighting actually a higher Kelvin number? So in the example that Larry gave, shouldn't it be 7000K, not 6000K? 6000K should appear more yellow-reddish ...


Or am I just full of BS? :)


Spleen
 

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Spleen,

You are correct. I may not have been totally clear. I meant

if he didn't like "6500K" for being too red/warm, he could set

it cooler (higher K). The next sentence meant that even though

"warm" in Sony parlance meant 6500K, it may really be 6000K

when measured (and that's why it may look too red/warm).

Very few displays come OOTB close to 6500K through the greyscale

at any preset.


larry
 

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My JVC plasma has a 6500K selection option. I find it to be too warm and only really useful when viewing black and white films. Otherwise, the picture is not a bright and 3d like as when I dial the settings back to normal.


I haven't had the plasma ISF'd to determine how close to actual 6500K the JVC option is calibrated out of the box. Therefore, I can't rule out the possibility that the option is not calibrated correctly. But it is close to what I have seen in other ISF'd screens.


Personally, I prefer the cooler "normal" setting as offering the best picture color and contrast and anyone who has compared the different screen settings of the JVC has agreed with me.


Other posters have stated that the 6500K "ideal" picture is an acquired taste that will/would grow on you. Given what I have seen, I will live by the "steaming rat" method and if/when I ISF my screen it will be primarily to determine if the 6500K option is truely calibrated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's interesting that the "normal" setting on my plasma is actually R +6, G 00, B +24, not zeroed like you'd expect. I'm starting to think that R 00 G 00 B 00 looks best!


PooperScooper, I know what you meant.
 

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Actually, Larry, when I reread your original post, I caught what you meant originally. My bad.


Spleen


(god, I really need to stop reading this forum after drinking ... ) :D
 

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Just in case its not clear yet, the "Warm" - "Cool" names run counter to the colour temperature as measured in K.


When an object heats up it starts glowing dull red and ends up rather blue at "white hot". That's where you K temperatures come in, red is cooler than blue/white.


However people commonly think of reds as "warm". like a wood fire and white/blue as rather cold, like snow. Joe Kane on Digital video essentials refers to this as "artistic temperature" (something like that), this is what is meant when colour temperatures are refered to as warm or cool.


Can be confusing if you're not careful.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by cybersoga
I've just listened to that bit on DVE, very interesting!
At least he came up with a PAL version for you. I hadn't found anything else to use to calibrate my display with for use with PAL. Now I have three of his, NTSC, PAL and 720p (on D-VHS) as well as AVIA.
 

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So the "cool" setting is actually using more electricity and putting more power to the tv's lighting system, correct?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Seanster
So the "cool" setting is actually using more electricity and putting more power to the tv's lighting system, correct?
Probably not, it'll be putting more energy into the blue phosphors and less into the red.
 
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