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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will be building 6 columns, 4 will contain speakers. I have a few questions:


1. What is the best method for wrapping the black fabric around the speaker opening, but still being able to gain access to the speaker?

2. What material is the best to make the columns? MDF, veneers, other?

3. Stain, cover the whole column with fabric, paint ??

4. Has any one put sconces towards the top of their columns? I?ll be able to keep the speaker wire and electrical wire about a foot apart. The speakers would sit about at the 4 ½ foot range, while the sconces would be at about 6 ½ feet. I have 8 foot ceilings.

5. Would it look stupid to have the black fabric on the 4 columns containing the speakers and not have any fabric on the other 2? Or should I make them all look the same?


Thanks in advance,
 

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Wow, I am in the SAME situation. 8 ft ceilings and everything It looks to be a tedious process. I do like what Ron Hanson has done and will "try" to do mine like his. Use a search for him and he has a link.


Someone help us:(
 

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Unfortunately my fabric is not 'easily' removable.

It is behind crown molding and chair rail so that would need to

be removed first. Also the way the fabric is pulled and fastened

is a little complicated but Ill try to explain.


I cut (2) 1-2" wide strips of 1/8" thick plywood. The fabric was cut to approximate size of the area needed to be covered with 4-6" of overlength. The fabric at the ends were stapled to the strips of plywood. The strips were rolled around the fabric to shorten to the exact length needed to cover the column. Then the fabric was stretched and the strips finished nailed on the back of the columns. In reality the width of the column fabric is about 1/4" wider than the front because of these strips. Since the column is 8" deep you cant see this. It did create a nice straight edge at the back where the column meets the wall. Removal would mean pulling the strips off the finish nails. Not exactly clean and easy.

I could make a little sketch if you're really interested.


Im sure there are better ways. If you want easy access to the columns you may need to make some columns that can be removed from the wall.


I think MDF is the way to go on the columns. Makes them real solid and gives them some mass. Id try to make them all look the same also.
 

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Here's another idea you might consider -


Frame the colums using 2x2's or 2x3's, and simply stretch the fabric around them. No drywall, no MDF, no nothing. However, you should paint the frames flat black to keep them from shining through the fabric. Also, fill the entire column full of fiberglass insulation for sound absorption. You should do that even if you decide to cover the framing members.


The reason for doing it this way is threefold:


1. The open column will provide a "boxless" enclosure for your speaker, which sound much better than placing it inside an enclosed column.


2. It's less work. No drywall mess, no cutting of MDF.


3. The fabric-over-insulation will be perfect for sound absorption, which is an added bonus. And it will work better without any covering under the fabric.


Doing it this way will make it look the same as if you drywalled the columns, but it's much better acoustically. You can still hang a sconce on it - just place a cross framing member between the vertical pieces and mount the sconce to that.


Now that's thinking outside of the box! Pun intended....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ron,


1. I tried your construction link, but no luck. Is this link valid?

2. Do you have any close up pictures of your columns?

3. What are the black holes I see at the bottom of the columns?

4. What type of wood and stain did you use for the bottom of the column?


Anyone else have any ideas?
 

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yes, the construction link is valid
http://24.31.30.101:81/theater/construction.htm

If you're having problems your internet connection doesnt let you browse on port 81 which is what I need to use. Try it from a different internet connection.


Ill try to email some pictures to you.


The black holes are ports for the built in surround speakers.


The wood on the sides is 1/8" cherry veneer plywood. I used minwax polyshades cherry for a stain.
 

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The only problem with this, If anybody touches the unsupported fabric, it can stretch. Then you have a sag in the fabric. Unless the insulation is very stiff. I have that problem to a smaller degree where the speakers actually are. I tell everybody to keep there hands in their pockets :)

Quote:
Originally posted by filmnut
Here's another idea you might consider -


Frame the colums using 2x2's or 2x3's, and simply stretch the fabric around them. No drywall, no MDF, no nothing. However, you should paint the frames flat black to keep them from shining through the fabric. Also, fill the entire column full of fiberglass insulation for sound absorption. You should do that even if you decide to cover the framing members.


The reason for doing it this way is threefold:


1. The open column will provide a "boxless" enclosure for your speaker, which sound much better than placing it inside an enclosed column.


2. It's less work. No drywall mess, no cutting of MDF.


3. The fabric-over-insulation will be perfect for sound absorption, which is an added bonus. And it will work better without any covering under the fabric.


Doing it this way will make it look the same as if you drywalled the columns, but it's much better acoustically. You can still hang a sconce on it - just place a cross framing member between the vertical pieces and mount the sconce to that.


Now that's thinking outside of the box! Pun intended....
 

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We constructed our columns by using MDF. We built a rectangular box that is open on the back side. We then cut openings in the front and sides of the MFD for the speakers (in columns where there will be a speaker). A picture of these columns is shown at http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View...4000&p=35386519

The darker, bottom part of the column is veneer stained in a cherry wood color. The top part is painted the color of the ceiling because the crown molding will extend down about 4 inches from the top of the column. The cloth will cover the space between the crown molding and the veneer. A chair rail will cover the line where the cloth and the veneer meet. The columns are pushed into slots build from 2X2s on the wall. You can see one of the mounted dipole speakers in the photograph below that will be hidden by one of the columns. http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View...4000&p=35386518

The space below the speaker is filled with fiberglass batting. For columns where there is no speaker, the entire column is filled with fiberglass batting.
 

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chris,


This seems like a good solution. How did you fasten the columns to the 2x2s when you slide it back?
 

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Here is what I did for our columns.


The column bases are ¾ inch oak veneered plywood. That are mitered and glued together. The front 2 columns don’t contain speakers are just 3 pieces of mdf that are mitered and glued together, the bases fit around them to bottom of the column and the tops got 3/4 firing strips to bring it flush with the bottom, batting and then wrapped in fabric. They were then screwed to the wall and trimmed in oak to hide the seams. The back 4 columns have speakers and have a “frame†of mdf that is wrapped in acoustic fabric that sits on top of the oak bases and they are trimmed in oak to hide the seam where the base and frame meet.


Check out my web site and you can see the columns before and after.


Hope that helps.
 

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Ron, the columns are attached with screws into the 1X2 board on the inside of the column. I drilled a hole through the MDF first. The screws are placed so that they are hidden under the chair rail when it is installed.


Chris
 
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