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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for the simpleton question.


I bought my parents an lcd with a ntsc/atsc/qam tuner.


I was thinking that my would be able to pickup (with the ntsc tuner built into the tv) the stations that they pickup when using the dta box.


Right now if I connect the dta box to the new tv, they get stations such as espn, lifetime, nesn, etc.


When I plug the the cable directly into the tv, I get just the qam stations-I was thinking that the ntsc tuner would find, and tune espn, lifetime, nesn, etc.


What am I missing? Do I need a reverse splitter?


Thank you
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBostn /forum/post/19602713


When I plug the the cable directly into the tv, I get just the qam stations-I was thinking that the ntsc tuner would find, and tune espn, lifetime, nesn, etc.


What am I missing? Do I need a reverse splitter?

NTSC is analog. If Comcast got rid of the analog stations (and they did in some markets), you're SOL getting them if the QAM tuner didn't pick up their digital simulcasts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah-but what is the dta box?

What I'm trying to spit out-is that the new tv has ntsc/qam/atsc tuners. I though between the qam and ntsc tuners I'd pick up the same stations as the dta adapter does.


Or does that little DTA decrypt the encrypted stations?
 

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The DTA should take any digital signals and convert them to analog for older TVs. If you're using a DTA, which only works with digital signals, the analog signal has probably gone bye-bye, so the NTSC tuner is now useless.


The QAM is trickier, as there are encrypted and unencrypted channels, and the unencrypted channels should come through. The ones you don't tune are likely encrypted. Although I'm not sure if Comcast ever got the waiver to put encryption in DTAs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBostn /forum/post/19603054


Yeah-but what is the dta box?

What I'm trying to spit out-is that the new tv has ntsc/qam/atsc tuners. I though between the qam and ntsc tuners I'd pick up the same stations as the dta adapter does.


Or does that little DTA decrypt the encrypted stations?

With the cable feed connected directly to the TV run an analog/digital cable channel scan. That will find all the unencrypted analog and digital channels the TV can tune on its own.


After that reconnect the DTA to compare what the TV tunes compared to what the DTA tunes. A TV channel scan with a DTA connected will find only analog channel 3 (or 4), the DTA's output channel.


You will find that the TV tunes clear QAM channels as subchannels, e.g. 6.1 or 76.8, while the DTA "maps" the channels to whole numbers according to the cable company's own numbering scheme.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Diga, I did do that-


With cable directly connected to the TV did not find espn, lifetime, amc, or nesn-but I did obviously get some nice locals in HD-I went through every channel the TV found after the channel scan.


With the crappy dta conneted...obviously no HD, but got espn, lifetime, amc, nesn, along with the locals in SD-My parents rather this setup than the one abve.


It's me who is trying to get the best of both worlds for them..local HD's and espn/lifetime/amc/nesn.
 

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If you want all the analog channels, plus the qam hd channels, you have two choices: ditch comcast, or get an a/b switch. To use the switch, plug a cable straight from the wall to the A side, then plug the output of the dta into the B side. When you want to watch regular cable, use the B side. When you want to watch HD use the A side.
 

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^ Ditching Comcast would be so much fun if there where viable alternatives...



Or better still, use a splitter and their old vcr. Run cable from wall into a bi-directional splitter, then one line from splitter to the tv, and the other into the box (these new cable boxes, the larger sized full boxes, and the small crappier DTAs need to communicate with the cable companies).

Then from the crappy DTA, into the back of the vcr. From vcr, run component cables (yellow video, red/white audio wires) into the new tv.


This will allow the tv to tune to unscrambled leftover analog channels as well as the HD versions of the local tv stations. To watch cable channels, you'd turn to the tv's input where the vcr is plugged in, and watch TNT, ESPN, etc over the vcr's ch 3.
 

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Those DTAs weren't really engineered for use with a modern flat screen. They're more for Comcast to provide to keep people from whining that grandma's Reagan-era Motorola CRT with an analog tuner could no longer show her "stories" after they switch the system to primarily digital.


For flat panels, Comcast wants you to rent their $10 a month HD cable box (or even better, their $20 a month HD DVR.) And they encrypt every channel but the locals and maybe a few others to force you into that.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa
For flat panels, Comcast wants you to rent their $10 a month HD cable box (or even better, their $20 a month HD DVR.)
+ the $6.95 digital outlet charge for any additional outlets
 
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