AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for some background information on component video cables. I was told by a video calibration specialist that you never should sotter the connection to the plug when using the cable for video. At the consumer electronics show a couple weeks ago almost every component video cable manufacturer sottered the connection. Does it make a difference? Any suggestions? I just don't want to get taken spending a fortune on cables that really aren't that good.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,003 Posts
Hi jedidia! Do you mean "solder"? I'm not sure how you could tell just by looking unless you peel back the sleeve on the end. I like Accoustic Research cables (don't know if they are soldered or not, but they are working well for me).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yup! Spelling is not my strongest skill.


Usually I am able to unscrew the plug to reveal the connection. I spent a fortune on cables from Harmonic Technology only to be told by the person that calibrated my DVD player and video projector that the cables were junk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,245 Posts
Are you buying pre-made cables or making your own?

If you purchase pre-made, you don't have to worry about "solder".


I suggest AR (Acoustic Research) cables from Best Buy or Circuit City ~$30.

If you make your own, use RG6 coax and some good "crimp on" connectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the cable to my video projector was terminated at my house with crimp tools. All of my other cables are pre-made. I was paying $175 for a 1 meter component cable. Do you think that the picture quality is the same using a $30 cable? Probably is because the video calibration person told me that if the connection was soldered the cable was junk (for video only). I found that hard to belive but I am the sucker who spent $175 on a component cable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,245 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by jedidia
Do you think that the picture quality is the same using a $30 cable?

IMO... that's very probable.

Probably is because the video calibration person told me that if the connection was soldered the cable was junk (for video only).

IMO... B.S.

I guess he offered to sell you "better" cables at $250 because they don't use solder? :rolleyes:

I found that hard to belive but I am the sucker who spent $175 on a component cable.

You are not alone...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I hear you but believe it or not the guy sold me a 40 foot component cable for $300 that he said was "broadcast quality." He is a certified ISF tech (The ISF (Imaging Science Foundation) was co-founded and (until recently) run by Joe Kane, a man with an extensive background in video display research, with Eastman Kodak, and film-to-video transfer, among other things. Joe, along with Joel Silver, started the ISF to help people achieve the best possible performance from their displays by adhering to the "rules" of the NTSC (National Television Systems Committee) television system. The ISF trains and certifies technicians, engineers and manufacturers to this end, teaching them to calibrate displays in adherence to the performance standards established by the creators of the NTSC system. For a fee, usually between $175-1000, these NTSC doctors make house calls, coming to your home to get your display working to the potential inherent in the NTSC system. The low end of the price spectrum represents direct-view 4:3 sets, which aren't as complex to calibrate. 16:9 sets, RPTVs, and front projectors are more complex devices in terms. The more complex the display, the more time, energy, and expertise is required to get the job done.) He really has the credentials which is why I cannot just dismiss what he said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,245 Posts
Most all of us know about the ISF, Joe Kane, Joel Silver, et al


ISF techs can be equated to a good auto mechanic. There are good and bad. Standards are standards. Tuning cars is not much different than tuning TV's. A good tech will recommend the appropriate parts to get the job done.


Based on your last response and previous question, it appears that you are questioning your expenditures for cables, but then try to justify that expense. Which is it? A question or a justification that you seek?


Is there a 'perceptible" difference between $75 and $250 ignition wires in your car? In most cases, no. Same with A/V.


If I told you I was an ISF tech... would you beleive me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I hear you. I am not questioning the cost. I just want the best video cable I can buy whether it is $30 or $1000. I sometimes equate cost with quality. I would have thought that a $400 1 meter cable would do a better job than a $30 1 meter cable. The ISF tech (who by the way is a founding member) told me that the $400 cable if it is soldered is junk and that only cables without solder are any good for video (whatever the cost). Because he is an expert (or supposed to be an expert) I want to believe what he is saying. The problem is that at the consumer electronics show I went to at least 15 cable vendors and everyone used solder and laughed when I suggested that solder is not the way to go with video cables. I am only trying to find out if anyone else in this forum has any experience with solder vs. nonsolder video cables and can either back-up what the ISF tech said by explaining why solder would make a difference or tell me the ISF tech (on this particular issue) doesn't know his ass from his elbow. I hope that makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,245 Posts
Here's food for thought...

If solder is bad for electronics or wire/cables, what would this ISF tech recommend that we use connect all of the elctronic components in radios, computers, TV's, microwave ovens, etc.


Many electronic components (connected with solder) carry much higher frequencies and bandwidth (in some instances) than video cables. The only point I would agree with is that a bad solder joint can cause problems. So I guess that if those $300 cables are hand soldered by blind one-armed paperhangers, yeah...


Wonder what recording, movie and broadcasting studios use for their cabling? I'll bet there's some solder in them thar cables!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,980 Posts
Quote:
I am only trying to find out if anyone else in this forum has any experience with solder vs. nonsolder video cables and can either back-up what the ISF tech said by explaining why solder would make a difference or tell me the ISF tech (on this particular issue) doesn't know his ass from his elbow. I hope that makes sense.
I've worked on broadcasting for a number of years. Depending on the installation, we have used twist on BNC's, fully crimped BNC (center pin and sheild) and crimped BNC's with a soldered center pin. Signal quality is the same for all 3. The twist on BNC;s are preferred as they can be easily replaced in the feild. Soldered BNC's are hated.

In short, solder won't affect the signal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by jedidia
I hear you. I am not questioning the cost. I just want the best video cable I can buy whether it is $30 or $1000. I sometimes equate cost with quality. I would have thought that a $400 1 meter cable would do a better job than a $30 1 meter cable. The ISF tech (who by the way is a founding member) told me that the $400 cable if it is soldered is junk and that only cables without solder are any good for video (whatever the cost). Because he is an expert (or supposed to be an expert) I want to believe what he is saying. The problem is that at the consumer electronics show I went to at least 15 cable vendors and everyone used solder and laughed when I suggested that solder is not the way to go with video cables. I am only trying to find out if anyone else in this forum has any experience with solder vs. nonsolder video cables and can either back-up what the ISF tech said by explaining why solder would make a difference or tell me the ISF tech (on this particular issue) doesn't know his ass from his elbow. I hope that makes sense.
If you really want the best, buy a well made Component Cable with Solid Silver Conductors. If you want the best for your money, try Blue Jeans Cables.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
solder is nice-looking, but is likely to cause mechanical problems during installation. Better temperature coefficient, not much privilege in terms of electrical performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,779 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by audiom3
If you want the best for your money, try Blue Jeans Cables.
I give that a strong second - I never heard of BlueJeans until I found this forum. Even though I am in Canada - and have to pay a nominal broker fee and tax, these cables are the best quality for price I have found. To get cables of this caliber here I would have to pay 10x that much (mostly markup - cables are a real cash grab - in the retail business we refer to this as 'shielding'. Ever go by 'pop' at a store at a real hot price - next time you do, take a look at what is surrounding it, usually salty snacks. The store may be losing money on the pop, but their nailing you with the chips, or vice-versa. Cables/electronics are no different).


Go Blue Jeans - great cables at a great price!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,936 Posts
I too have bought almost all my cables at BlueJeanscable.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top