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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed that some of the higher end receivers are starting to do this now. Is there a component video switcher that will do this as well? It would be a great to only run 1 cable to my projector. Also, you would not have to select inputs on your projector/tv for different sources. I would love this as my current RPTV does not have discrete IR codes for the various inputs into the monitor. You have to toggle between all the inputs and select the right one. This makes switching between input sources a pain, especially for new users.


Thanks,

Hal
 

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Um, I think its pretty clear that he wants to upconvert his signals.


Hal, you can do this in various ways. I've seen products that will auto-sense signals coming in and then do the conversion. You are basically looking for a line-doubler (going from interlaced composite or s-video to component). Do some searches on different types/models and see what features they have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Wouldn't you rather decode the composite or s-video to component?
Exactly. Was something unclear in what I wrote? As the title of the post says, I want to convert S-video and Composite to Component. That way, I can only run 1 component cable to the projector.


This feature is now showing up on the higher end receivers. I know the Denon AVR-5803 does the Video Conversion of Composite to S-Video and/or to Component. My current receiver will only output what is input into it. If s-vid in, you get s-vid out. You have to run multiple cables from your receiver to whatever display device you use and then select that input when viewing that source.


I don't want a new receiver. I want a video switcher that does the same thing. Multiple sources in, and only component out. Two component outputs would be even better (1 for a projector and 1 for a monitor, for instance).


Does one exist?


Thanks

- Hal
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess I type too slow. Thanks for the reply. I didn't think of looking into line doublers because I thought that would be overkill. I wonder how the receivers do the conversion. I guess I need to do some research here as you suggested.


Thanks

- Hal
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No problem HK43.


Well, that CMT-7 device looks interesting, but it is only 1/2 way there. You could buy one of those and input you non-component sources, then then output it to a regular component switcher with your other component devices and get the job done.


Any other options?


Thanks,

- Hal
 

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The thread title is correct. Some of the repliers misunderstood it.


It is one thing to convert composite to S-video (and then to component). It is another thing to do it well.


A poor Y/C separation filter needed for composite to S-video can give you such problems as dot crawl and loss of fine detail.


Going from S-video to component can leave such problems as poor chrominance resolution and red push.


A transcoder is not the device we are talking about either. What videophiles refer to as a transcoder is the device to convert RGB to component or vice versa.


You will have to do the research to find out how well receivers with these features accomplish these conversions. The answers may be in magazine reviews or testimony from friends, but without that, the only way to find out is by using test patterns and/or test equipment.


If you are starting to shop for an A/V receiver with these conversions you should be thinking about line doublers or scalers at the same time. Unless you know for sure you will never buy a line doubler or scaler in the future. There are reasonably priced doublers (e.g. iScan Pro and Ultra) and scalers (e.g. Lumagen Vision) that have high quality composite to S-video to component video conversion. Buying a receiver now with these conversions and a doubler or scaler later may leave you with redundancy that you paid extra for. (Not sure how well the N6, CS-1, CS-2, CS-HD, AVT3700 deal with composite video, perhaps someone else can fill in.)


Video hints:
http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
 

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I took an alternative approach that might appeal to some provided their projector has a reasonable quality internal scaler.


I used a five conductor cable originally designed for RGB applications (RGB +HV sync) from my processor to my projector. I used three of the conductors for component and one of the remaining two for composite, feeding the composite into a separate input on the projector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the replies.


In my case, I generally do not care too much about the s-vid or composite signals as far as their PQ. I generally watch either DVD through component or my HT tuner through RGB. but, I do have a CD player jukebox (with on-screen menu) and a camcorder that output composite, and a VCR and a Tivo that outputs S-video. I guess I watch the Tivo fairly regularly, so I take that back somewhat.


However, the discussion here has caused me to rethink my requirement somewhat. The "best practice" is probably to run a cable for each of your projectors inputs and make sure your projector has a discrete IR code for each input. Then life is good.


But, I would still be interested in knowing if a device like I described exists. This recent thread on av selectors has devices that are close, but no conversion to component. Perhaps there will be one in the future.


Regards,

Hal
 
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