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I am pretty sure most computer monitors are not hi def and I was wanting to know what the technical reasons are such as lack of decoders or any other technical factors. I am pretty much trying to prove to a friend that most computer lcd's are not HD capable. Also, is there a such thing as an HD monitor that is not widescreen? Thanks!
 

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This is a lot like asking which is a fruit, apples or oranges ...


They are made for different jobs. A computer monitor must have a VGA or DVI input to connect to a video card. It needs a fairly high resolution to display text well. It needs other things such as power management so it will go to standby when not being used. It does not need fancy image processors because these are provided by the computer. It does not need HDCP compliance. That said most computer monitors are 1024x768 or higher so would have enough pixels to display an HD signal.


A TV must have a tuner and speakers, and inputs like an antenna input and usually adds composite, S-video, component, and (these days) HDMI. These would be wasted on a computer monitor. If the TV has a DVI input, it almost certainly should have HDCP copy protection so it will work with home theater equipment. It probably has image processing like a scaler, 3:2 pulldown, and such to improve the picture quality. It almost certainly doesn't have power management.


The "official" Consumer Electronics Association definition of when the HDTV logo can be applied is at least 720 lines of vertical resolution and a 16:9 ratio, so yes all HD is widescreen.
 

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HD means minimum resolution of 1280x720. Many newer LCD computer monitors support at least 1280x1024, well within HD "minimum range" and fully capable of displaying HD. Of course you'll need HD source and that's the problem. HD tuner card can cost more than the whole computer and due to smaller screen it's not a good solution for family to watch TV. HD signal by definition is 16:9 wide screen, however with above monitor example you can watch 1280x720 HD video at 1:1 pixel ratio with no problem, but you will have black bars at the top and bottom. Nowadays with 2 concurent standards (4:3 for SD and 16:9 for HD) you better get used to the bars anyway since HD TV will have vertical bars showing SD programing and SD TV will have horizontal bars for widescreen programing, there is no way around it unless you like to watch distorted, squashed or stretched video. The ratio of the screen itself doesn't really matter as long as there are enough pixels on the screen to show that minimum resolution of 1280x720 at 1:1 ratio. Some will claim that even lower resolution can be HD as long as it's close enough.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by martyj19
The "official" Consumer Electronics Association definition of when the HDTV logo can be applied is at least 720 lines of vertical resolution and a 16:9 ratio, so yes all HD is widescreen.
That definition is a little messed up since it doesn't list square pixel as requirement. If it did then it would be equal to "my" definition of 1280x720 as a minimum(720/9*16), as it is it could have something like 1024x768 listed as HD with non square pixels.
 

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Yes, there is plenty of debate on this forum about that definition, and whether it ought to sleaze 1024x768 in or out. I cleverly sidestep that discussion here by discussing its use in authorizing the HDTV logo. :) And yes, a 1024x768 plasma does not have square pixels nor does the definition require them.
 

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PC monitors have always been much higher def than TVs, especially for the price. But, PC monitors are NOT TVs. I watch my DVDs in "increased" def (DCDi) on my PC monitor in 720p via DVI. You could get a TV tuner card for your PC, BUT the resolution of SDTV is so bad you will go blind watching it on a PC.
 
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