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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Matt Grant recently put some Concentric-6 drivers up for sale and my brother had been asking me about building some bookshelf speakers for him. So, I decided this was potentially an opportunity to do so. And my brother agreed. I also decided that I wanted a pair of these for myself. Here is a link to the drivers:

Concentric-6 Drivers

My brother was interested in assisting, so that he might learn something. So I decided to keep things relatively simple and use these Denovo flat pack enclosures from Parts Express:

Denovo Enclosures

Also, to keep things relatively simple, I asked Matt to also provide assembled crossovers and some MDF baffle plates.

We assembled the enclosures (minus the baffles) while waiting for Matt to acquire the crossover parts, assemble them, and ship them to us:

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The components arrived in good shape and look great:


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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The plan that evolved included trying to use some cherry wood that has been laying in my shop for a few years. It was given to me when the place where I used to work decided it was in their way:

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I asked a luthier friend (who has the proper tools) to re-saw this cherry wood into slices that are 1/10” thick. My thoughts were that I could use any excess cherry wood that might be left over for making mountain dulcimers. And Sam did a fabulous job re-sawing the cherry wood:

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I am familiar with the laminating process for HPL (high pressure laminate). But not so familiar with the process for laminating with typically much thinner veneer. And decided to try the HPL methods using this 1/10” thick cherry wood. I probably could have used contact cement (like is typically used with HPL) and saved a lot of glue drying time. But, I decided to try it with Titebond wood glue and clamps:


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I tried to give these a “book-matched” look (similar to a guitar top, etc.) in honor of my luthier friend Sam.


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How did my baffles fit on those flatpack enclosures?

I'm really looking forward to the photos of the finished speakers, the cherry veneer looks great so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How did my baffles fit on those flatpack enclosures?

I'm really looking forward to the photos of the finished speakers, the cherry veneer looks great so far.

Matt, the baffles couldn’t have been better for those enclosures. This photo probably shows that aspect the best:

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If anything, it works best if they are just a hair larger than the actual dimensions of the box. That way, a little sanding brings them down flush. And I believe that is what they are.

Thanks for the complement. I hope to have some speaker gasket tape delivered in the next few days. I decided to try to use that to bring the drivers up so that they are flush with the 1/10” thick veneer. Once that is done I can photograph the completed speakers. I used Danish Oil Finish,which is a satin finish. So there is no real sheen to them. I figure that I can add some polyurethane later if I want some sheen.
 

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These look great so far! Resawing my own veneer is a huge part of why I love woodworking. Next time, you should definitely try the contact cement process as it is super easy and fast, if your're interested. Thick cherry veneer looks so good and it's what I used on my recent Concentric-8 build (coincidentally), if you haven't seen it.
Also, if you ever feel like branching out with the finish, I highly recommend a product called Osmo. I have had to order it online in the past, but my local Woodcraft just started carrying it, which is awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
These look great so far! Resawing my own veneer is a huge part of why I love woodworking. Next time, you should definitely try the contact cement process as it is super easy and fast, if your're interested. Thick cherry veneer looks so good and it's what I used on my recent Concentric-8 build (coincidentally), if you haven't seen it.
Also, if you ever feel like branching out with the finish, I highly recommend a product called Osmo. I have had to order it online in the past, but my local Woodcraft just started carrying it, which is awesome.


Thanks! I wish I had a larger bandsaw and could try my hand at re-sawing. I will probably try it on a smaller piece of lumber on my bench top bandsaw when I have the need. Sam described a wheel that he devised and utilized to help guide the pieces as he sawed them. I need to find out more and try to learn more about how to do it. What thickness veneer do you usually cut?
The Osmo products look good! I will definitely try it soon. Do you use the original one or one of the other versions.
 

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@Charles Collins Resawing generally does not require any other pieces, other than a good blade and the saw being set up true to the fence. You'd want to make sure it all tracks straight. I've cut anywhere from almost a 1/4" and down from there. I don't tend to shoot for any specific thickness; I just aim to get what I need out of the raw stock after planing and sanding.
For Osmo, I have used the PolyX oils in regular, matte and satin sheens. It's such an easy product to use and is super durable. It's what I've used on several pairs of speakers now and the butcherblock countertop island in my kitchen. Even red wine marks wipe right off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@Charles Collins Resawing generally does not require any other pieces, other than a good blade and the saw being set up true to the fence. You'd want to make sure it all tracks straight. I've cut anywhere from almost a 1/4" and down from there. I don't tend to shoot for any specific thickness; I just aim to get what I need out of the raw stock after planing and sanding.
For Osmo, I have used the PolyX oils in regular, matte and satin sheens. It's such an easy product to use and is super durable. It's what I've used on several pairs of speakers now and the butcherblock countertop island in my kitchen. Even red wine marks wipe right off.
Yea, Sam was saying that he could keep an eye on the top of the board, but the bottom sometimes strayed. And I think that the guide was for the bottom. We didn’t have time to discuss it fully, and I will ask for more information next time I see him. It might just be the wide boards that have a significant issue for him. He did seem satisfied with the results, and he is one of the best and most experienced luthiers around. Thanks for the Osmo info, definitely on the list!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
These look great so far! Resawing my own veneer is a huge part of why I love woodworking. Next time, you should definitely try the contact cement process as it is super easy and fast, if your're interested. Thick cherry veneer looks so good and it's what I used on my recent Concentric-8 build (coincidentally), if you haven't seen it.
Also, if you ever feel like branching out with the finish, I highly recommend a product called Osmo. I have had to order it online in the past, but my local Woodcraft just started carrying it, which is awesome.

I just now saw the link to your concentric-8 build by inadvertently expanding the list in your signature (didn’t realize I needed to do that). I had only seen the very end of that thread where you were hanging them on the wall. Those turned out looking beautiful. I like the combination of cherry and walnut. And you did use the Osmo finish on them which looks great! I really do like the glossy appearance. So I ordered some of the glossy Osmo and will suggest it to my brother when I veneer his speakers. I am pretty sure he will say yes. So I am looking forward to using it on them. :)
 

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So I ordered some of the glossy Osmo and will suggest it to my brother when I veneer his speakers. I am pretty sure he will say yes. So I am looking forward to using it on them. :)
Nice! I like to spread the good word for that product.
For resawing, it is helpful to have some kind of featherboard set up to keep the bottom edge of the stock pushed up against the fence. I've just found that you shouldn't make it too tight of a fit though because it will actually cause tracking problems, at least on my 17" Grizzly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Nice! I like to spread the good word for that product.
For resawing, it is helpful to have some kind of featherboard set up to keep the bottom edge of the stock pushed up against the fence. I've just found that you shouldn't make it too tight of a fit though because it will actually cause tracking problems, at least on my 17" Grizzly.

Yes, it sounded to me that he was describing a featherboard type device that uses a roller of some sort (in lieu of the flexible “fingers”). And the tightness issue was probably one of the details that he needed to iron out. He indicated that he got everything figured out. I will try to find out more when the opportunity arises.

So, I finally got the finish done on the speakers and put everything together. Here are the photos:

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They are as Matt Grant described, excellent sounding speakers (thanks again Matt). I rounded off the edges of the veneer (except on the back) with a 1/8’ radius round over. This is something that shouldn’t be done with high pressure laminate or very thin veneer. And so it shows that the veneer is real wood and thicker than most veneer. Thanks again to Sam for re-sawing the cherry wood. The finish is Danish Oil Finish which has a satin look and so isn’t very glossy. That is four coats and some buffing with 0000 steel wool. I am very pleased with the look and sound of these speakers. I am testing out the Osmo glossy finish on some scrap cherry veneer. Hopefully my brother will approve it for the finish on his speakers which I hope to get started on soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
As expected, my brother approved the Osmo finish for his pair of speakers. Here are some photos that should let you compare Osmo to the Danish Oil Finish on my pair (above). I really like the Osmo finish even more than I expected. It seems to have less blotchiness than the Danish Oil Finish and is glossy (versus the satin finish of the Danish Oil Finish). The grain of the wood comes through better. I found out that a quality paint brush that is made for all finishes and fairly stiff works well for me. Thanks for steering me to the Osmo finish.

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Oh, and my brother, like myself, loves the sound of these speakers. Thanks again Matt Grant!
 

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Those turned out very nice. I have a pair of these in progress with the same cabinets / baffles, intending for a much simpler paint finish, but ended up stuck waiting on back-ordered crossover parts from PE.

I am curious what you think of the bass capabilities. Modeling the drivers in this cabinet showed them to be xmax limited at fairly low power, at high enough frequencies that an 80hz sub crossover wouldn't fix it. My thought was that if I liked the sound enough but wanted more volume, I could rebuild them as tops over something like a variant of Bagby's Universal Woofer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Those turned out very nice. I have a pair of these in progress with the same cabinets / baffles, intending for a much simpler paint finish, but ended up stuck waiting on back-ordered crossover parts from PE.

I am curious what you think of the bass capabilities. Modeling the drivers in this cabinet showed them to be xmax limited at fairly low power, at high enough frequencies that an 80hz sub crossover wouldn't fix it. My thought was that if I liked the sound enough but wanted more volume, I could rebuild them as tops over something like a variant of Bagby's Universal Woofer.
Thanks, it was a fun and educational experience working with the cherry wood. Matt Grant substituted a component or two (due to availability at Parts Express) when he provided assembled crossovers for me. He didn’t specify to me what was substituted. There are photos of the crossover near the beginning of this thread. You might be able to discern this from the photos. Or I would think that Matt would share the information if we asked. Perhaps that might get you going again.

I haven’t done any measurements other than the auto EQ on my receiver. But I think these have good bass for most music, especially for such a small driver. However, the lower frequencies do need a subwoofer to help re-enforce them. If I remember correctly, my Onkyo receiver wanted to cross these over at 60 hz. And I manually changed it to 70 hz because that sounds better to me. I don’t normally listen at high volume levels, but one time I inadvertently (thanks to finicky WiFi connectivity) cranked them up high enough to run people out of the room. I was busy trying to get them turned back down, but don’t remember hearing anything terrible. Did you model them using the same ports as I used?
 
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