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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to run conduit to the attic from basement distribution center of a new construction home. What can you use for the conduit? It sounds like a dumb quetion, but I don't want to violate any codes.


Can you use 2" PVC? What about the Resi-gard?


Just wanting some options. Will probably run 2 of these 2" conduits up to attic for upgrades later.


How do you run the wires in the attic to each room? Can you just drape them across joists?


If I want to run conduit from entertainment location to the distribution location, can this have any turns/elbows in the run or will this cause a major problem when pulling cables?


Thanks for the help....
 

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disclaimer: i am not an electrician


so long as it's not a plenum (air space) I wouldn't see any problems with either so long as it's only low voltage in there, if the home is still incomplete see if you can drop by sometime when the eletrical contractor is there and bounce the idea off him, resi-gard should be allowed by code since that's one of the purposes of the stuff.


once you start putting in corners and bends, you shouldn't have any problems pulling cables through that so long as you leave a pull string in there when you lay it or you may run into problems actually pulling in the cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've read in here that some builders don't like customers to run low-voltage wiring because it could cause problems during inspection.


What would you have to do with low-voltage to cause a big problem with an inspector? It seems this would not be a big problem being low-voltage or speaker wires, etc.


Just want to know what not to do??? Would really rather run most runs before dry-wall, but don't want to cause problems or have to rip out the work for inspectors.


Can you contact inspectors some how to find out what they are looking for?


Thanks,
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcmap1
Can you contact inspectors some how to find out what they are looking for?
Absolutely. Call your local building department. Check to see if your town has their building codes posted.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcmap1
I've read in here that some builders don't like customers to run low-voltage wiring because it could cause problems during inspection.


What would you have to do with low-voltage to cause a big problem with an inspector? It seems this would not be a big problem being low-voltage or speaker wires, etc.
I just went through this process a few weeks back with a new home I'm building in NH. I wanted to use low voltage boxes (carlon) for RG6 and speaker wire and the electrician wiring the home advised against it based on his experience with the local inspector. Something about fire being able to spread into the walls because of the open back. Rather than chance it I just used standard new construction boxes.


Tom
 

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Can you use 2" PVC? What about the Resi-gard?


1. Any electrical conduit will work, resigard is fine.

How do you run the wires in the attic to each room? Can you just drape them across joists?


2. Drape the cabling across the joists, avoid areas where you think you might put down some attic flooring for storage purposes.

If I want to run conduit from entertainment location to the distribution location, can this have any turns/elbows in the run or will this cause a major problem when pulling cables?


3. Elbows are fine, though the fewer the better. The pull string is a good idea, however you can also just use a pull wire like most electricians use to pull wire through conduit.


There are no dumb questions...If there is a possible code issue, definitely contact your building inspector on the subject.


chris
 

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There is no such thing as a nationally applicable electrical code in the U.S.A. The NEC is a model code produced by an industry association. It has no legal effect until it is adopted by incorporation by reference into some law. No government is under any obligation to use it. That said, most jurisdictions do indeed adopt some flavor of the NEC as the basis for their electrical code. But even when they do, it is unlikely that it is the current version. Where I live, the local electrical code is based on the 1996 NEC with state and local modifications. It takes time for the government agencies to review new model codes and incorporate them into law.


I defintely recommend that if you do not know exactly what is permissible by your local electrical code that you check with your local building inspector before doing anything.


The list of things an inspector would write up that might be done by someone unfamiliar with the local code would be a mile long. What might make perfect sense to you or me could very likely be illegal.


Interesting that an inspector might have a problem with using low voltage brackets instead of boxes for low voltage wiring. Might be a case of the inspector going by what he thinks is best instead of by the law unless it was a fire rated wall. Or it might be a case of the local code going beyond the NEC.
 

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Here in So. Cal., the inspector just *ignored* all my backless orange boxes, the low voltage wiring, and everything else associated with my installations of the CATV, phone, audio, and internet wiring.


Our builder and his electrician were willing to be consulted, and helped a few times to answer my questions, but I think common sense in installing helped keep it below the radar.
 

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My builder told me the same thing. He said basically firestop your holes, don't do anything stupid, make it look neat and the inspector won't care about the low voltage wiring.
 

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I ended up building a 20foot raceway from the data room to the attic. Its about 15" square. All my low voltage comes in thru this raceway and down to the data closet. I have plenty of room for future upgrades. I have only used about 20% of the space. Still waiting for the inspection.
 

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Use colorful cables and avoid black to make it stand out as low voltage and not electrical. I saw home depot has some like 1.5" plastic conduit that was sold in bulk also. Run pull strings through you conduit and tape off on the ends. Use different colors for each cable type, and this will make your life easier.


My new home was recently wired by pros and they put the conduit almost vertically into the walls, alongside some aluminum vent or exhaust tubes (all the way from the basement to the attic) ... and this worked well, because the vent runs were within "dead wall spaces" and needed to be straight (or nearly so) anyways. So the conduit just went in the same dead space areas and just required some big circular holes to be drilled and then filled with the expansive foam stuff later.
 

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Quote:
What do you use to create the fire-stop? I know this sounds stupid, but I am new to this.
I actually just bought Fire Stop Caulk from Home Depot. It was $5 for a small tube. My builder told me (and again this is my area, YMMV) that the expanding foam insulation is enough.
 

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Make sure you have builder approval of what your planning on doing. This might just mean talking with the superintendant and getting an a nod that you can do it, but if it causes delays or failed inspections, you might be paying the penalty.
 
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