AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My VCR just died! I rarely ever watch a VHS tape but decided to pop one in last night. Well I never got to watch my tape because the VCR just quit all together with the tape stuck inside. I did eventually get my tape out by unscewing everything and with hopefully not too much damage.


So my questions is I need to some how get a replacement. I was thinking of getting a VCR/DVD combo so I can transfer my VHS to DVD. Do I need a VCR/DVD Recorder to do this? After reading some posts on here I have noticed that many say to avoid a combo unit. I also have read that you should not play a DVD to just watch in a DVD Recorder.


When I got my 1st TIVO last Christmas I could not afford to get a TIVO with a DVD recorder with it, so I just have a 40 hour standard TIVO. I currently have a stand alone Apex DVD player, but have been wondering lately about it's life span. I have only had it less than 5 years old. My Tv is a JVC and only about 3 years old.


So bottomline is I need advice on what to buy and the brand I should get. What VCR? What DVD Recorder? What DVD player?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by WarEagle10677
So my questions is I need to some how get a replacement. I was thinking of getting a VCR/DVD combo so I can transfer my VHS to DVD. Do I need a VCR/DVD Recorder to do this? After reading some posts on here I have noticed that many say to avoid a combo unit.
The reason that many here (including me) recommend not getting one is that the DVD recorder portion of the unit often lacks the features found on their standalone versions. For example, most lack a hard drive.


It is easier to have a combo unit to transfer tapes, but ONLY if they lack Macrovision or any other copyright-protection schemes. If the tapes have these, the one touch dubbing feature won't work.


Unless space is an issue, it's usually better to get a separate DVD recorder and a separate VCR.

Quote:
I also have read that you should not play a DVD to just watch in a DVD Recorder.
Some people feel that the reason you don't want to do this is because you don't want to prematurely "wear out" your unit. Whether this is truly the case is debatable; I used a Philips 985 as my sole player, and it managed to last 2 1/2 years, seemingly a record for this notoriously unreliable model.


However, a good reason to have a dedicated DVD player is because most DVD recorders don't give as good a playback picture as many affordable DVD players. However, most DVD recorders will give as good a picture or better than your Apex, so if you're happy with that then any DVD recorder will suffice.

Quote:
When I got my 1st TIVO last Christmas I could not afford to get a TIVO with a DVD recorder with it, so I just have a 40 hour standard TIVO.
Check out these links on how to upgrade your TiVo's storage capacity, some of them ridiculously long (like you'd have that much time to watch TV):

http://www.ptvupgrade.com/

http://www.9thtee.com/tivoupgrades.htm

http://www.weaknees.com/

http://www.tvrevo.com/


All of these will void your warranty, so you may want to wait until your TiVo is at least a year old.


TiVo (or any DVR) and DVD recorders are an excellent mix. Use the DVR for your timeshifting, and when you want to save a particular program that's where the DVD recorder comes in. Note that just because you have a DVR doesn't mean you don't have to get a unit with a hard drive; an HDD-equipped DVD recorder makes the removal of commercials much, much easier.

Quote:
I currently have a stand alone Apex DVD player, but have been wondering lately about it's life span. I have only had it less than 5 years old. My Tv is a JVC and only about 3 years old.
Personally, I'm surprised the Apex lasted that long. Again, if you're happy with the playback of the Apex unit, any DVD recorder will be satisfactory if not better for you.


The TV is fine. Make sure that when you hook up that DVD recorder that you use the best connections possible. If it has Component Video IN (red/green/blue jacks) then take advantage of it. More than likely it has s-video (multiple tiny pins) and composite (yellow RCA jacks); if this is the case, use s-video, it gives better picture quality than composite.

Quote:
So bottomline is I need advice on what to buy and the brand I should get. What VCR? What DVD Recorder? What DVD player?
That's like asking what brand car is best.


If all you have to spend is $200, there are many good models from Pioneer and Panasonic. If you can spend $400, both companies have models that have HDD's. You may be tempted to consider JVC (to simplify the remote controls), but FYI if you peruse these boards you'll notice that for some reason, JVC DVD recorders aren't living up to the reputation of their VHS models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much RonDawg for the information!


My Apex DVD was a christmas gift years ago and has been giving me some trouble now so I am figuring it is starting to die.


What I hear from you is that if I can afford to get a DVD Recorder with a hard drive then do it. And to go ahead and get a separate DVD player and a separate VCR to do transfering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,606 Posts
Just thought I'd add that like Store Bought Video Tapes, Store Bought DVDs can't be copied either because they also have a Gopy Guard system in them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Above is ONLY MY OPINION!


If one device (VCR or DVD) of combo is damaged, then you may think about combo as damaged at all. If you have separate devices, that if one of it is damaged, then another one is still in good condition.


Why you shouldn't use DVD recorder as a DVD player? It is debatable, of course, but if you use DVD recorder only to record, that it can, propably, works great for a longer time. It is only my opinion, but each use of mechanical devices degrades them, so if you use them rarely, then better. DVD players are simply DVD players, so if you use standard model of DVD player, it is cheaper then DVD recorder. So you can replace it much easier then the recorder.


I've heard somewhere about combo that have VCR, DVD and HDD on board. However, if you decide to buy combo machine, it is the best way to go.


ArtS :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
I agree with ArtS; if one half breaks, then you either have to put up with 1/2 the machine you paid for, or else do without both while it's getting repaired.


The only HDD-DVDR-VCR combo I know of is the JVC; what little I have seen posted of it here has generally not been positive.


WarEagle: again, there are many brands and models out there. If you only want to spend $200 on a DVD recorder, the Pioneer 220/225 (discontinued but still available if you look hard enough) or the current 231/233 are good choices, as is the Panasonic ES-10.


If you want to step up to a HDD-equipped model, the Pioneer 531/533 is getting good reviews for its PQ but there is major controversy over its TV Guide EPG and how it affects the usability of the machine; the older 420/520 series are near-impossible to find but if you can find one, snatch it up. The Panasonic EH50 is also getting good reviews here.


If you insist on a combo DVDR/VCR unit the Panasonic ES30V is also getting good reviews; be aware that this model lacks an HDD, and if you want to be able to make easily editable discs you are forced to use DVD-RAM which has very little compatibility in the DVD player world, outside of models made by Panasonic themselves. It uses DVD-RW but in Video mode only, which is not editable on the disc itself.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top