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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got several old components that I'd like to connect together but I'm a little "fuzzy" on the right way to do it. Most of my problem centers around the receiver.


I have read in the past that all of the components of a home entertainment center should be run to the receiver and the receiver should then be connected to the display.


I have also read that the majority of receivers do an awful job of passing on the video signal (or perhaps upconverting it). So I don't know what to do.


My ragtag assortment of equipment is all pretty new to me though it's quite old. Nonetheless I'd like to get the most out of it.


This is what I've got:


Sony 34" HD Tube TV circa 2003. 1 DVI Input, 2 Component Inputs

Sony DVD player circa 1998. 1 S-Video Output

Tivo Series 2. S-Video Output

Comcast Digital Cable Box - HDMI output, Component Output

Home Theatre PC - HDMI output, DVI\\SPDIF output

Denon AVR 3300 Receiver - 2 Component Input, a lot of S-Video Input


What I'm wondering is if I should be running everything to the Denon receiver and then connecting the Denon receiver to the TV. In it's day I believe the receiver was a pretty good one. Should it be handling the video signal?


Thanks,


MJ
 

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As for the video signal it will probably pass though just fine. Some older receivers don’t upscale video well but you shouldn’t have an issue since that isn’t a feature. If you are worried about it then I would try connecting one of the video sources to the TV and then to the receiver and see if you notice a difference between the two.


The issue with your receiver is that you will have to switch BOTH the TV and the AVR when changing some sources. So if you are changing S-video sources you’ll only have to change the AVR but if you change to a component video source you will have to change the TV also. Also, the AVR can’t connect the PC to the TV.


The only think I would recommend is looking for a DVD player that can handle a progressive signal because the s-video doesn’t handle it. You could then connect the component video from the DVD player to the receiver.


You could also look for a newer AVR that does a decent job of upscaling and then you could have everything run through the AVR to the TV and you won’t have to change the input on the TV. Then the limiting factor will be if your TV’s DVI input is digital or analog. Depending on that you might be only able to upscale the video to a component output to your TV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick reply. If you don't mind I need clarification for some of what you said.


What did you mean when by "some older receivers don't upscale video well but you shouldn't have an issue since that isn't a feature"?


What do you mean that when you say I'll have to switch both the TV and the AVR when changing some sources?


If I connect everything (except the PC of course) to the receiver whether it's via component or S-Video connection I'm still only connecting the receiver to the TV with one set of component cables, right? I won't have to change the input on the TV then, right?


Can you tell me the recommended way to connect everything I've got? Is that asking too much?


Thanks for the help thus far,


MJ
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by manicjonah /forum/post/18281027


Thanks for the quick reply. If you don't mind I need clarification for some of what you said.


What did you mean when by "some older receivers don't upscale video well but you shouldn't have an issue since that isn't a feature"?


What do you mean that when you say I'll have to switch both the TV and the AVR when changing some sources?


If I connect everything (except the PC of course) to the receiver whether it's via component or S-Video connection I'm still only connecting the receiver to the TV with one set of component cables, right? I won't have to change the input on the TV then, right?


Can you tell me the recommended way to connect everything I've got? Is that asking too much?


Thanks for the help thus far,


MJ

So, I'll go out on a limb here and simply say your stuff is so old, that nobody has setup any gear like it in years and probably aren't real excited in providing information this out of date. But you are right. The poster who responded knows nothing. Plug everything into your receiver via s-video or component and then one set of component cables out to the tv. That gets you video on all devices provided that device is selected in the receiver. Run the audio cables from your input devices to the corresponding inputs on the receiver. No need to switch input on the tv. I assume you know how to assign inputs in your receiver and run speaker cables so I won't comment on that. Good luck but it's pretty straight forward.
 

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I didn't think the AVR-3300 would convert s-video/composite signals to component video. I thought they are separate. If 1 componenet video out works, then great. Otherwise you will need 2 separate "monitor out" connections from your AVR to the TV.


For example:


AVR Input >> AVR Monitor Out to TV >> TV Input


DVD S-video >> S-video >> S-video

Tivo S-video >> S-video >> S-video

Cable Component >> Component >> Component


Obviously you will need to connect the associated audio cables with the inputs. You can also connect the PC to the TV directly but choose one of the AVR inputs for the audio.


I have some older components too and I have to get creative with some of the sources.


Older equipment isn't always "bad" equipment especially when it comes to audio.
 

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Ya know, the Denon owner's manual has several very good drawings (which no one looked at, I guess), which show how to hook up all the equipment that the OP has. Even the audio from the computer. Here it is in case anyone is interested:

http://usa.denon.com/avr3300_ownersmanual.pdf


A quick read of the manual did not seem to indicate that the Denon has the capability to cross convert video formats between composite, S, and component video. That is not surprising. Someone might want to read it a little closer to see if I am correct. But if the inputs and outputs are set up properly, it should be capable of routing the selected video and audio inputs to the tv without any cable switching at the tv.
 

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I did look at the manual from the Denon sit. Plus they have a Tech Notes .pdf at

http://usa.denon.com/avr3300_technotes.pdf


This has some good info also but not as indepth as the manual.


There shouldn't be a need for cable switching but the TV Input 1, 2 or 3 might need to be changed depending if the s-video or component is being used.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aidoroboo /forum/post/18285188


There shouldn't be a need for cable switching but the TV Input 1, 2 or 3 might need to be changed depending if the s-video or component is being used.

Press a button on the tv remote. Simple enough. (I misinterpreted your earlier comment about input changes on the tv.)
 

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I have a Denon 3300 and no, it does not convert s-video or composite videos to component. I never used the Denon 3300 as a switcher for videos as at that time, I use it for tv and I sometimes wouldn't want to turn the receiver on just to watch tv specially if its just my son watching cartoons. And I maybe wrong but I always prefer it that cables go straight from the source to the display, of course that is before HDMI. I still have the Denon 3300 which I now use in our living room as 2.1 system. It is the heaviest receiver I own and up till now, it still looks like its the toughest of them all. Rated 105 wpc but it can play louder than my Marantz sr7002 rated 110 wpc. Then again, like aidoroboo said. You'll need to switch sources from your tv as well as denon 3300 would not convert s-video and composite videos to component.
 
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