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April 8, 2003


Total awareness of HDTV has increased to four in five (80%) today from about two-thirds (68%) of all adults in June 2002, according to the new CTAM Pulse Survey, HDTV: At What Price?


Among multi-channel television consumers, digital cable subscribers have the highest unaided awareness of HDTV at 79%. Ninety-two percent of adults who have seen HDTV or are broadband users have unaided awareness of the technology.


In addition, the research reported on consumer interest and purchasing intent.

· Twenty-two percent of consumers report a “great deal†or “quite a bit†of interest in HDTV, with interest highest among digital cable subscribers (36%) and broadband users (38%).

· Over a quarter (28%) of respondents said that they are “very†or “somewhat†likely to buy a wide-screen HDTV monitor and decoder if the price falls to $1,800 in the next three years, and as cost declines the percentage increases. However, even at $300, 23% of consumers said that they are “not at all likely†to buy HDTV equipment in the next three years.


Additional highlights include:

· Forty-two percent of adults surveyed reported that they did not know the difference between digital television and HDTV, while 15% responded they are the same thing.

· Of the TV households aware of HDTV in March 2003, 43% of consumers didn’t know how to get an HDTV signal into their home, compared to 50% who didn’t know in June 2002.

· More than half (53%) of customers who are aware of HDTV have seen it displayed. The vast majority of these customers saw the sets in a retail environment (74%).

· HDTV’s picture quality is the product attribute cited most often as appealing by two-thirds (66%) of consumers.



This research is based on a telephone survey conducted by CENTRIS (Communications, Entertainment and Technology Research and Information Service). The study surveyed 1,017 respondents in television households and included 396 analog, 189 digital and 254 DBS customers among the sample. The margin of error for the total sample is +/- 3.1%, and data has been weighted to reflect the U.S. population 18 years of age and older. Interviews were conducted February 24 to March 7, 2003.
 

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Now if we could only increase awareness that 1080i isn't better than 720p even though it's a bigger number.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Aaron Oz
Now if we could only increase awareness that 1080i isn't better than 720p even though it's a bigger number.
That's YOUR opinion!


I have compared 1080i (shot in native 1080i) on a native 1080i Display and 720p (shot in native 720p) on a Native 720p display and I can still see a quite noticable difference in clarity/crispness of 1080i over 720p. And the comparison was a identical source recorded in both 1080i & 720 so it was a correct comparison. The close shots are fairly similar (with 1080i still having slight edge) and with far/long shots the extra resolution of 1080i made it quite a bit better then 720p. Now I guess if you prefer the much softer film look then 720p would indeed be preferred but if you like the in your face clarity then 1080i is by far the way to go (until 1080p is out).


If you know of anyone who works at a High Def production facility they should be able to give you a comparison like I was given.
 

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· Forty-two percent of adults surveyed reported that they did not know the difference between digital television and HDTV, while 15% responded they are the same thing.

OK, now is the 15% that said HDTV and digital television are the same thing part of the 42% that said they did not know the difference between the two? Because obviously, anyone who thinks digital television is the same thing as HDTV doesn't know the difference between the two. Or does this mean 42% know that they don't know the difference, while another 15% also don't know the difference, but think they do?
 

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They might be familiar with the term HDTV, but most of them think that HDTV = RPTV. How many are sitting at home watching NTSC and interlaced DVD on those big screens? Most of them, right? If that's their choice, it's one thing, but to waste money buying an HD capable unit - how sad. The big box stores like Bestbuy would do themselves a big favor by holding in-store seminars to explain what it is, similar to the clinics that Homedepot has for home improvement. The misconceptions will be hard to break.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by FrankS
That's YOUR opinion!


I have compared 1080i (shot in native 1080i) on a native 1080i Display and 720p (shot in native 720p) on a Native 720p display and I can still see a quite noticeable difference in clarity/crispness of 1080i over 720p.
I would also love to see that the A/B comparison as long as they were recorded on comparable quality cameras and lenses, under the same lighting conditions with the exact same subject matter.


If that was the case, it sounds as if the 720p MPEG codecs may be suspect. Was the group that performed this test more familiar with producing 1080i material vs the 720p material?


The mention of your display devices would have to come under scrutiny. Your mention that you reviewed the material on a 1080i native rate display doesn't make any sense. A 1080i native rate display device certainly isn't a bulb projector, and a CRT that is only capable of displaying 1080i sounds a lot like a less expensive rear projection CRT. So yes, a lower priced 1080i/720p resolution CRT might give the appearance of a softer 720p image vs a 1080i signal which is easier to reproduce. The only true test would have to be done on a good EM 9" CRT projector. Otherwise a computer monitor could also show the superior quality of 720p over 1080i.


It all comes down to available bandwidth. Do you believe that Dolby Digital's lower bit rate could sound _better_ than DTS's higher bit rate? The only arguement there would have to be based upon the quality of the codecs.


Finally, my last issue with interlaced material is simply based on the inherent interlacing artifacts that are simply part of any interlaced signal. If you don't mind watching sports or other 'fast moving' material 1080i interlaced, there would be no convincing you otherwise because interlacing artifacts aren't bothersome to you.


Anyway, this now off topic argument should be moved elsewhere :)
 

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Now if we could only increase awareness that 1080i isn't better than 720p even though it's a bigger number.



__________________


I beleive my lieing eyes


So far it very often is, sorry. and yes I can view both natively and I know that you don't get 1920 by 1080i with 1080i, but none the less give me 1080i till they do a better job with 720p if it even can be. not a huge difference right now but I am glad 1080i exists so as the display, cameras and encoding technologies improves to take advantage of the full resolution of 1080 so will the picture beyond that of 720p even more. it is not just about now, but the future too..



as to artifacts I think sometimes people think that problems the encoders have keeping up with fast motion and large pans are strictly interlace artifacts and blame 1080i totally. maybe I am wrong but i think often it is just too much information to be processed. IF the superbowl is 720p @60 I'm quite happy to have 1080i as done by cbs or hdnet for sports
 
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