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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a Hughes E86 HDTV receiver and, because of a lack of space in our built-ins, it has to be placed in a semi-enclosed cabinet area. It has a fair amount of open space around it, but it is still in an enclosed area in which heat could build up.


I remember reading through some earlier posts about over-heating of HDTV receivers causing some problems with their performance and about suggestions for adding fans to assist in cooling.


Does anyone have a suggestion for a small fan that I could purchase and easily add on to the unit, or point me back to the threads or threads that discuss this? I'm not that mechanically minded myself, so it would have to be something that I can purchase and pretty readily add to the unit rather than something internal that I would have to take apart the unit myself in order to include -- assuming the former is even possible. I don't have any room inside the cabinet for a big fan or anything like that, but is there some small clip-on type of fan available for these situations?


Thanks as always for your great advice and assistance.
 

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I have had success with a small (8-9") desk fan blowing across the top of the STB. Available at Home Depot, etc, for $10-15.
 

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I have a small 4" fan sitting on top of my E86 in the left rear corner (when viewed from the front). It is drawing air out of the E86, which, when the fan is running, is barely warm to the touch. Before the fan, the E86 got very hot.


My fan is not attached, just sitting on top of the E86.


Credit goes to greywolf for the easy solution that will likely extend the life of the E86 and improve its stability.
 

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I might deserve credit for position which doesn't matter that much. I'm fairly sure I got the idea of a 12V fan at 6V from somebody else. Other than that, I think I just post a lot. Now that I'm retired, I've got to something besides make sawdust and watch TV.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pat: How do you connect the wires on the fan to the DC electrical source? I went to Ratshack tonight and saw the types of fans you referred to. They each seem to be made to fit into a computer slot with two raw wires hanging out waiting to be connected to the electrical charge.


Are these the type of fans you are talking about? If so, what do you use for your electrical source and how do you connect these wires to it? (I warned you I was technically challenged.) When you said "brick" in one of your posts, was that just a big 6V battery that the wires could attach to? When you and other posters referred to AC-to-6 or 12 volt DC adaptors, how do you connect the wires to those adaptors; the only adaptors I'm used to seeing of that sort have plug-in type output connections, such as for cellphone charging or transformers.


Can anyone be a little more explicit as to how these computer fans would be connected and set up? Once wired properly, do they literally just sit on top of the HDTV receiver unit (left-rear of unit)?
 

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If you go to radio shack, ask for the quietest 8cm computer fan they have. This is one 6cm example that I found online but the stores have a number to choose from.


One example of a 6V power adapter is this. .


Each item has two wires. Leave the power adapter unplugged. Cut the end connectors off of each wire. Strip 1/2" of insulation from each wire. Twist one bared wire end from the power adapter with one bared wire end from the fan. Then twist the remaining 2 single bared wire ends together. Keeping the 2 twisted together wire ends from touching each other (6V is undetectable when touched much less harmful), plug in the adapter. There is a 50/50 chance the fan will run at this point. If not, unplug the power adapter, disconnect the wires, and reverse the connections. If wire 1 and wire 2 from the fan don't work with wire 3 and wire 4 on the power adapter connected 1 to 3 and 2 to 4, connect 1 to 4 and 2 to 3 instead.


Once the fan is running, unplug the power supply and use electrical tape or preferably small wire nuts to hold and protect the connections. If you somehow convince yourself that this is beyond you, print this out and take it with you and ask the Radio Shack people for help.


I'm sure you can do it. The fan just sits on top of the STB positioned to pull hot air out of the top of the box through the box vent holes. Drawing the hot air out forces cool air in through the other vent holes.
 

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I tried that AC fan in Bill's link. It's way too noisy for me. It really moves a lot of air though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You guys are great! I think even I can follow the directions you laid out for me, Pat. Thanks for the patience.


I will give it a go this weekend. If you read about a house fire in Los Angeles that destroyed $5,000 worth of new video and audio equipment, however, you will know that it didn't go as well as planned!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One more question I forgot to ask:


What is the reason/advantage of using the 6 volt adaptor for the 12 volt fan? Is the fan too powerful or too noisy if you used the full 12 volts?


If you really wanted to get a lot of air moving, would it actually be better to try to use a 12 volt power source?
 

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6 volt power supply for the 12 volt fan is a tradeoff between needed airflow and minimizing noise.
 

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Right, very little airflow is needed to clear the heat from the box. It was designed to work without a fan after all but it seems the design parameters did not allow for enough variation in parts or box placement.


Very little noise can easily be too much. One of my fans was salvaged, not that quiet, and has a higher CFM rating. I run it on a variable power adapter set at 4.5 volts.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by greywolf
Very little noise can easily be too much. One of my fans was salvaged, not that quiet, and has a higher CFM rating. I run it on a variable power adapter set at 4.5 volts.
Which suggests an alternative if you want a little flexibility. Instead of getting 6v adapter, Radio Shack also sells adapters that have a switch to adjuct the voltage. Depending on the model you get it shouldn't be that much more expensive. That way you can vary the voltage for the best balance between noise and air movement.


Note: Some 12v fans won't start much below 4-5v. So don't bother getting an adapter with a range of outputs lower than that.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by greywolf
I tried that AC fan in Bill's link. It's way too noisy for me. It really moves a lot of air though.
The desk fan that I am using, which I already owned, is very quiet at the quite adequate low speed. It is inaudible when the TV audio is on. (It is also inaudible when the TV audio is off and I am not in the room -- like the tree falling in the forest.)


By the way, I spoke with my dealer today. The same one with whom I had swapped an HD5 and three E86s, all of which had suffered what we now know to be the same heat related problem. At the time, I was his only complaintant among a large clientele. (I believe him.) Today, he told me that they have had an epidemic of similar E86 heat related problems in the past few months -- including their floor model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Checking the Radio Shack inventory, there are a couple of AC adaptors with variable voltage that sound promising. What amperage rating should I be getting: 300mA or 800mA? The fan Pat suggested looks like it's rated at 110mA max, but the 6-volt non-variable AC adaptor he suggested was listed as a 300mA model.
 

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A 300mA power adapter will be plenty and cost less.


As long as the volt x amp rating of the power supply is greater than the volt x amp rating of the fan it will be ok. I don't think I've ever seen a power adapter that wouldn't handle 1 fan.


I just linked those items as examples rather than recommendations. The fan recommendation is for the quietest they have and the power adapter recommendation is to go variable or get the cheapest 6V.
 
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