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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1292 and have been reading the posts about fan mods with great interest.

Now the idea of cooling it with water popped up. High performance computer can be cooled with water and I am thinking about reasons not to try the same thing with a pj. One thought is the tube, does it need to be cooled? Another issue might be the high voltage.


Any ideas?


/Kent
 

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To quote an old joke:


Child at school:

"Water, Electricity & a Physics Teacher - This should be GOOD !"


Pure water is non-conductive, the more impurities, the more it conducts.

I've not come accross pure water...


But High Voltages will take the easiest route....


It's nice it theory, but I think that by the time you've fitted a pump, a header tank, piping, a radator, cooling devices (I've seen them for CPU on computers) sorted out leak prevension and/or detection...


with a water cooled Computer, if you get a leak, it's all low voltages (Except the PSU), and you have to replace a motherboard and/or CPU - cost £200/£300 ish.


with a projector, if you get a leak.... Ouch - High voltages in the wrong place - Bang goes all the video processing boards at £200++ each...


Cold water on a hot tube - thermal shock - crack - Hissssss... one new tube later - £400++ each...


also I have seen reviews of water cooling devices for PC that had problems, there were dissimilar metals used in them... and you got rust & blockages after less than 1 year...(It killed the CPU - by letting it get too hot, and was the cause of a minor leak)


I think a hush box or a sutable fan mod or louder surround sound system to mask it...


I have seen an experiment on the web, where they got hold of a modern chemical, water like, but non-conductive designed for pumping across computer boards to cool them - it was expensive, and I don't know what the breakdown voltage was... so it may be unsutable for high voltages...


also CRT are designed for use in air, you place them in a liquid and the pressure on them will increase - and could cause them to crack.



Anyway - Have fun... (I'm the one watching from a bomb proof bunker!)

:D
 

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I'm remembering the Cray 3 supercomputer that was cooled with liquid freon. Basically, the entire enclosure was sealed, and compressed freon pumped in. The heated freon would circulate through a heat exchanger, and then back in the box. Aside from the difficult in sealing a PJ, you can't get R12 any longer.


Mike Frank
 

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Maybe the clear fluid between the crt and glass faceplate could be piped, pumped, and cooled by a remote radiator. But that doesn't help electronics that are in the projector.


I work with a lot of robot cabinets with processors that need to be cooled in a very dirty and sometimes hot factory environment. Many times, they use air conditioners and for the most part they seem to work good. I have often wondered whether a projector could be air conditioned the same way. And if the evaporator and compressor were placed physically in another room, the projector would be almost silent yet would stay plenty cool. Thats because all there would be in the projector itself is the condenser cooling coil and a small fan. Just an idea I had....it will probably never be done.


Another possibility might be to cool the 1292 with a silent refrigerator that uses dissimilar metals to operate. I just saw a chest advertised in "the Sharper Image" catalog that can either heat or cool, depending on how the current runs through the metal junction. According to what I read, this chest can cool without using a compressor which means it would be dead quiet. Perhaps something like that could be retrofitted to a 1292.
 

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>Another possibility might be to cool the 1292 with a silent >refrigerator that uses dissimilar metals to operate. I just >saw a chest advertised in "the Sharper Image" catalog that >can either heat or cool, depending on how the current runs >through the metal junction.


You are describing peltier effect semiconductors - available reasonably readily. One problem - they are very inefficient, and they are pretty small - so you have to fit them with a massive heatsink OR a bigass fan, negating any gains you would have made.


Cheers

Heath Young
 

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Why don`t you just put your projector inside a refrigerator and close the door on it...

At least it will work once you take it out of there.
 

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But if you put the projector in the fridge do the red green and blue lights go out when you shut the door>? ARE YOU SURE >? :)
 

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Maybe he just wants to cool the air in a hush box with some kind of air/water heat exchanger. Cooling and recirculating the same air should keep the projector cleaner. Could have ducts to an adjacent room with the heat exchanger.

Another idea: cannibalize a dehumidifier and use it to cool the hush box.
 

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Kent, dousing a projector with water is generally frowned upon. We do wholeheartedly recommend water torture on bulb projectors though..:p


Heath, the fact that you know what the Peltier effect is means you have way too much time on your hands. You do redeem yourself later in the post though where you refer to 'bigass' fans. Now you're talking our language!..:D


Curt
 

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All CRT's are liquid cooled. It sits between the lens and the phospher plate.
 

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The older IBM mainframe computers I used to work on were water cooled. The heatsinks were called cold plates and had chilled water pumped through them. All of the fittings were of the highest quality and I never heard of a leak in a CPU. But we're talking about machines that cost millions of dollars- I doubt you'll find any "kit" that will offer the same guarantee. The newer CMOS processors have redundant built in air conditioners that work much better. You can dry your hair if you stand in front of the hot air been blown out. :)
 

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When you talk about IBM mainframes I don't think silence is one section they worked for ;)

I moved an (with about 20 other techs) IBM mainframe once, 8 racks 500 kg / rack. Were two racks were the cooling pumps.

Then there were about 8 water lines from each pump and it was not the easy-bending-type-hose either.

But it worked :D
 

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Sorry, but I don't get. I have a BG808, and I never really hear the noise.


Nicholas
 

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It's much cheaper to build an effective (sealed) hushbox with in/out venting fans that lead to another room then to try to build an effective (perfectly sealed) water cooling system for your 1292.


Kal
 

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I agree that it is a"neato" concept , but I think the biggest differnce has been hinted to, but not nailed down. In a PC situation, the heat generating source is nicely defined and easy to configure to (processor or other small flat wafer thingies). In a projector, the heat sorces are multiple and varying geometry so adapting them to a liquid cooling system would be more complex. I guess you could try to chill a large plate of hightly conductive material (copper or aluminum and place it in near proximity above the unit and let convection take care (or try) of the rest.
 

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It could be done with HFE (hydrofluoroether) - you could submerge the whole projector, build some sort of seal around the lenses.

Quote:
quote from the screensavers

Produced by 3M, HFE is a liquid designed for heat transfer. Cooling with HFE involves submerging your motherboard, CPU, and expansion cards into the liquid. The liquid draws the heat away from your components, keeping them cool and functional. Please note: Because your components rest in liquid, you don't want to have anything with moving parts (storage drives, fans, and such) submerged in HFE. The liquid creates resistance, which affects performance.



According to an article in Chemical Processing (February, 2001), HFE is an alternative to perfluorocarbons, deionized water, and chlorinated fluids, which have serious environmental, compatibility, and toxicological considerations, compared with HFE.
needless to say - It could be done - but at great expense $220 US a gallon.


if you want to read more check it out here


....good luck to any who are crazy enough to actually attempt this (although I know using the word crazy will only encourage some)
 

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Quote:
It's much cheaper to build an effective (sealed) hushbox with in/out venting fans that lead to another room then to try to build an effective (perfectly sealed) water cooling system for your 1292.
I agree. Only concern I personally would have with the hush box is lower ceiling height and questionable aesthetics.
 
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