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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought two CD's tonight from EMI - Deep Purple's "Bananas" and Iron Maiden's "Dance Of Death". (Hands-down winner: Deep Purple.)Anyway, as a matter of principle I decided to attempt ripping them to my HTPC even though both proudly display the "Copy Controlled" logo on them.


While the contents of the discs that show up in My Computer are nothing more than a crappy media player (which plays 128kbps versions of the songs), I decided to try to play the album in PowerDVD. Hey - it found the .cda tracks and played them no problem!


Then I used JR Software's Media Center 9.1 to play - and RIP - both discs into lossless WMA9 files. No problem-o!


So I'm extremely happy and just a little confused - I paid good money for two CD's and I am able to rip them and play without issue, though the labeling and disc layout would suggest otherwise. If EMI standardizes on this brand of CD protection, I'm quite fine with that decision! :)


-Doug


P.S. It ain't the artist's fault that the labels are playing this game with consumers. Go show your support for a great band and pick up the latest Deep Purple disc. As for Iron Maiden...did I mention it was only $14? :)
 

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1) No it is not a surprise, all these copy-prevention schemes rely on abusing the error correction features of a CD. Different cd/dvd rom drives are affected differently. Seems like some of the cheaper drives are the most immune.


2) Yes it is the artists fault. Particularly with well established artists like Deep Purple and Iron Maiden who should have enough weight nowadays that they don't have to take whatever contract a distributor offers them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Jah-Wren Ryel
1) No it is not a surprise, all these copy-prevention schemes rely on abusing the error correction features of a CD. Different cd/dvd rom drives are affected differently. Seems like some of the cheaper drives are the most immune.
Hooray for Lite-On!

Quote:
2) Yes it is the artists fault. Particularly with well established artists like Deep Purple and Iron Maiden who should have enough weight nowadays that they don't have to take whatever contract a distributor offers them. [/b]

In 1973 and 1984 respectively, I might have agreed with you. Not that they're note well-established from a fan-base perspective, but I can't imagine either of these bands carry the weight required today because they're just not in the limelight and haven't been for some time. Both bands have been with EMI for eons and it would likely be career suicide to jeopardize a longstanding contract. Take Ugly Kid Joe for example - does anyone even know that they released two albums since their first, each arguably better than the last? Few do because they ping-ponged between labels and were effectively wiped off the map (you may applaud - I'm not sure of your musical tastes. Heheh :)


Now, that's just my opinion - for all I know, both bands are avid proponents of DRM. I sincerely have my doubts though, given both bands' histories of being very public-accessible and loyal to fans. If it's not too off-topic for this forum (and it very likely is) I'd like to hear more comments.


Take care,


-Doug
 

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I am curious that no one has brought this up yet but here it goes. What about analog ripping? I don't see how the copy protected cd's are going to stop people from ripping a cd into an mp3 if it still can be played- period. Doesn't musicmatch still have a way to make mp3's through the analog out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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Originally posted by SKoprowski
I am curious that no one has brought this up yet but here it goes. What about analog ripping? I don't see how the copy protected cd's are going to stop people from ripping a cd into an mp3 if it atill can be played period. Doesn't musicmatch still have a way to make mp3's through the analog out?
As does Media Center 9 and many others. I've got a home recording studio with relatively good gear, and I had every intent on recording the albums that way until I found out it wasn't necessary.


-Doug
 

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My point is that copy protected cd's only prevent digital ripping, not analog. It may be more time consuming, but it is not going to totally stop people from copying the music at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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Originally posted by SKoprowski
My point is that copy protected cd's only prevent digital ripping, not analog. It may be more time consuming, but it is not going to totally stop people from copying the music at all.
You're absolutely right. Digital copy measures are enacted to prevent bit-perfect digital copies, under the pretence that each successive analogue recording degrades in quality so who cares. However, one high-quality analogue rip which is distributed digitally will always get around the system.


Even DVD-Audio discs can be circumvented by recording via a high-end 24/96 multichannel audio card, and then re-encoding in multichannel lossless WMA9 Pro.


-Doug
 

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That is the analog hole. There is no way to close it, since the signal must eventually become analog.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Mr.Poindexter
That is the analog hole. There is no way to close it, since the signal must eventually become analog.
Which is one reason why the argument that anti-coping efforts are illegal/imoral single they deny people their fair-use rights don't hold water.
 

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Just because you can copy something via analog doesn't mean that the fair use rights will always be there. The anti-copying efforts are aimed in the wrong direction when it comes to copy protection, as they are trying to put copy protection where it wasn't before and it is causing problems, like CDs that don't work, lock up your computer, etc. And in reality, you cannot make a digital file uncopyable any more than you can make water not wet.
 

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Maybe you guy's haven't noticed, but the various asses of america - RIAA, MPAA, etc keep trying to plug the analog hole too. Most of the time they get laughed out of the room, but occasionaly some vendor or some lawmaker takes them seriously enough to press the issue. Basically all the schemes involve all new analog input hardware being smart enough to recognize watermarks and block recording when they see one. Kind of like the way your VCR will recognize macrovision out of the DVD player and will actively prevent you from recording. Used to be that macrovision just caused the VCR to record an unwatchable signal, but now the VCRs actively look for it.
 
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