AVS Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When reading consumer and professional reviews of loudspeakers, I often hear terms such as "midbass," "uppermids," etc., etc. when describing the sound. My question is, are there some hard and fast points in the frequency range that corresponds to these and other terms? Is one persons "lowermids" the same Hrz range as someone else's? And what exactly is that range? Is there a link to a chart that sorts this out or does anyone here want to post one?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
It's about like: sub bass up to 100 Hz, midbass from that point up to about 400 Hz, mids from that point up to about 6000 Hz, tweeter from that point up. Mids and tweets cross a wider range, when thinking in terms of frequency (cycles) than the lower drivers, but when thinking in terms of octaves they are about the same. For example, 40 to 80 Hz is one octave, and 80 to 160 Hz is an octave. At the same time, 3000 to 6000 Hz is one octave. So just as much as sub bass and midbass crossover and share the responsiblity of the 80 to 160 Hz range, the mids and tweeter cross and share, normally, at between 2000 Hz and 4000 Hz.


In terms of octaves (which is how you should think of music or sound), there are about 10 octaves of sound. The highest and lowest can't very well be heard by the majority so you could think of it as about 8 octaves. Sub handles 2 or so, midbass handles 2 or 3, mids handle 3 to 4, tweeters handle 3 or 4. The lower tones are more difficult to reproduce and take many times more power than the higher ones, so the drivers that reproduce these lower tones have a more limited function than the smaller drivers.


The "lower mids" of one speaker system may be slightly dissimiliar to another speaker system. In one, it could be a description of the blended sound between the small mids and the separate subwoofer; in the other, it could be the sound of individual dedicated midbass woofers.


In all that, can you tell that there are no "hard and fast points" when describing these ranges?
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top