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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Neither my architect nor I have built a home theater before (I know: the blind leading the blind), but we're going for it anyway. I'm wondering if I can pose a few lingering questions I think I know answers to (mostly from browsing this forum), but can't find concisely addressed anywhere. So here goes:


1. What's a reasonable soundproofing/dampening wall treatment (there will be a furnace and A/C blower directly on the other side of one of the walls -- and I'd like to be able to mute sound coming out of the HT so I can play it loud)? [ASSUMPTION: double-layer of sheetrock on walls (and ceiling?)].


2. How do I damp resonance of metal studs (which I have to use in this room)? [ASSUMPTION: lots of insulation -- but any specific brands/specs used for this would be welcome]


3. Is it possible to get an affordable custom-size screen with a fairly high gain (1.5ish). My screen is going to be about 99" diagonal, permanently built-in to a wall cabinet with protective sliding doors, etc.


4. What's a good floor finish treatment for a concrete slab (basement) floor? [ASSUMPTION: heavy pads and carpeting]


5. What's a good speaker grille fabric? [ASSUMPTION: something called 701 -- but I don't know manufacturer, etc.]


6. Should I wait for the new Plus HDTV-compatible DLP projector, or go with the existing Piano -- which I think was stunning enough. I probably won't be using it for HDTV any time soon, but will be using it as a video game/computer monitor projector, so the extra resolution may be useful.


7. Is there an issue playing a video game through a DLP projector? The XBOX manual warns against using a projection display, but maybe that's only addressing older tube projectors ...


8. How far can I run a DVI cable from computer to projector? I need about 25'. [ASSUMPTION:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oops:


[ASSUMPTION: I'll try 25' and add a repeater only if it doesn't work.]


Many thanks for any guidance.


Ralphie
 

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double sheetrock wont do alot-if you have room near furnace build a double wall,kinda like sound proofing -if using hat stripps on walls to hang rock fill the cavity with spray foam-line cavity of steel studs with sheet material at parts express its made for sound dampening-no air pockets any where fill everything on walls and ceiling
 

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I can answer 4, 5, 6.


4 - Pad and Carpet. Some people like to construct a wood sub floor, but then you have to worry about dampening it. Most go with carpet and pad, but be prepared to pay extra for the carpet installers having to install tack strips on concrete.


5 - FR701 by Guilford of Maine (GOM). Most use this fabric to cover their walls, but it is mostly accoustically transparent and can be used for speaker grills.


6 - If you are just entering the construction phase, you can afford to wait and see if the new Piano is what you want. Release of the new Piano will only lower the cost of the existing one, if that's the one you decide to purchase.
 

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For the money your going to spend,


Why not Hire Dennis Erskine for the plans and questions,and then have your builder build it..that way there WILL be NO mess ups:)


Tommy
 

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I would echo Mercury's comments on using Dennis for your design work. From what I have seen, he is very reasonable and has had the benefit of doing many home theaters. This is not a good project on which to learn what you should have done after it's done.


Deane
 

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For sound-proofing, all holes in the sheet-rock must be sealed. There is a caulking you can use that is made for acoustic settings, although I don't know where you would find it or who makes it or anything. Double sheet-rock is good, offset-double studded walls and double sheetrock is better. Add insulation between the double studs, and that is even better. If your contractor/builder doesn't know how to do this, maybe he needs to go back to contractors school. Check with him, I am sure he knows what to do. Also, when putting in the sheetrock, make sure that the seams are not on top of each other, but rather offset from each other.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by SVonhof
Also, when putting in the sheetrock, make sure that the seams are not on top of each other, but rather offset from each other.
A good way to insure this is to run the first course vertical and the second course horizontal. Watch for multiples of WxL sheet rock as it will still cause seam overlap (IE two 4x8 on the side will equal one 4x8 on end vertically).
 
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