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crap I feel asleep with google on my screen..IR

I use my telly as monitor and watch all media through it...I was browsing a site with heavy greys and I can see "GOOGLE" burned into the screen.

I knew I was playing with fire, this is why I avoided plasma TV's.

any way to erases the "google"? God LCD never did this to me.
 

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That's very weird. What kind of plasma set are you talking about? Typically it just goes away from what I've seen.

You might want to try posting in the dedicated plasma forum. Probably more people there with plasmas than in the OLED forum.
 

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It's not permanent, Image Retention magically diminishes on these OLED panels if you turn the TV off for about 4-5 hours. They do automatic wear compensation periodically while turned off, that really and truly works. Even so, that's pretty darn hard to do - Google would be a relatively static page, not a lot of animated ads or stuff like that. When these TVs detect a static image for any length of time, they aggressively reduce brightness.
 

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My Samsung plasma goes dim if it detects a static image for 10 minutes. I've been using it as a PC display and gaming screen for a few years now and haven't even noticed any IR. I'm surprised that LG OLEDs wouldn't have a similar function. I'm glad I didn't buy into the plasma IR/burn-in scare campaigns by LCD makers to be honest.
 

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My Samsung plasma goes dim if it detects a static image for 10 minutes. I've been using it as a PC display and gaming screen for a few years now and haven't even noticed any IR. I'm surprised that LG OLEDs wouldn't have a similar function. I'm glad I didn't buy into the plasma IR/burn-in scare campaigns by LCD makers to be honest.
I've owned probably a dozen plasmas over the years, and I only have one TV with something really and truly burned into it. It has the old Cartoon Network logo (the long checkerboard). Obviously considering the age of that logo, the TV itself is pretty old, but even though it's permanent it doesn't bother me one bit. You have to have a full field white screen to notice it most of the time.

Pixel orbiters largely solved this problem years ago. Samsung even detects static images on their final generation plasmas and dims the screen, exactly like you said - and LG OLEDs do the same. The LG OLED doesn't have a pixel orbiter feature to prevent image retention, but it has some pretty good self-maintenance features that will get rid of it after the fact.
 

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You could always enable a screensaver on your OS...or just have the PC stop outputting a video signal\after a period of inactivity (by default it should do this after something like 20 minutes unless you've manually changed it).

And much like others said, let it sit overnight or similar - it's likely to be IR and not actual burn-in. This is similar to how later CRT monitors behaved as well.
 

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I'll check back tomorrow and update if it's gone.
Set the input to Tuner and if you don't have an antenna, pick any channel. The typical between-channel snow (unless it mutes the input when it's off-channel) is random and is one of the fastest ways to eliminate the burn-in.

Look in the TVs advanced menu- it may have a 'Scrolling bar', found by selecting Menu, Setup, Anti Image Retention (this is the way to find it with Panasonic plasma TVs).
 

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They do automatic wear compensation periodically while turned off, that really and truly works.
It's true that simply turning them off will fix most of the IR that shows up on these things; at least so far that's been the reported case.

But what do you mean by "They do automatic wear compensation periodically while turned off", and where did you read it?
 

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It's true that simply turning them off will fix most of the IR that shows up on these things; at least so far that's been the reported case.

But what do you mean by "They do automatic wear compensation periodically while turned off", and where did you read it?
No offence, tgm, but as a forum regular I'm surprised you don't know about LG's means to address voltage drift in the transistors serving the pixels.

Here's a link to more on this, and a quote explaining the solution..

http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/tvs/1401612/why-your-next-tv-should-be-oled

To prevent the threshold voltage from deteriorating over time and causing an imbalance in luminance, LG has also developed special circuit algorithms to sense any potential changes in the threshold voltage of each pixel. This will adjust luminance levels on a real-time basis, helping the panel last longer and prevent staining
Desk
 

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it's gone. I didn't do anything special. Kaldaien was on point.
Good to hear it disappeared as it should, Jesusplay, and that the LG OLEDs are proving just as robust as we've now come to expect.

BTW, I might suggest editing your initial post to include an update, just in case any casual browser discovers the thread, reads 'burn in', and doesn't go any further.

Desk
 

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No offence, tgm, but as a forum regular I'm surprised you don't know about LG's means to address voltage drift in the transistors serving the pixels.

Here's a link to more on this, and a quote explaining the solution..

http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/tvs/1401612/why-your-next-tv-should-be-oled

Desk
Desk, what are you talking about? That article is about voltage thresholds, and that's a real time compensation done while the TV is on. We understand those issues here. That's not what he was talking about at all.

His quote was this: "They do automatic wear compensation periodically while turned off, that really and truly works."

While off? It may be true, but if so, he's talking about a completely different active mechanism and I want to know what it is.
 

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BTW, I might suggest editing your initial post to include an update, just in case any casual browser discovers the thread, reads 'burn in', and doesn't go any further.
I mostly agree with this, but I'm also worried that someone who sees something they *think* is burn in, won't find the "good news" here.
 

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Desk, what are you talking about? That article is about voltage thresholds, and that's a real time compensation done while the TV is on. We understand those issues here. That's not what he was talking about at all.

His quote was this: "They do automatic wear compensation periodically while turned off, that really and truly works."

While off? It may be true, but if so, he's talking about a completely different mechanism and I want to know what it is.
It's discussed anecdotally on several forums. The problem with LG is they are very much an enigma, their own instruction manuals list next to nothing a typical consumer would want to know. You can learn/guess more about how they work from reading their patents than any published literature :p

The patented technology in that article does appear to happen in real-time, thus is likely applied whether the TV's fully on or in standby. But it's been said that the first generation would only perform this corrective action in response to a power cycle (e.g. when switched off), and only after 4 hours of runtime.

Whatever the case, there's active IR elimination in these TVs that runs without user intervention (just not exactly clear when it runs); very different from having to manually scroll a white bar or do a white wash on a plasma.
 

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^^^ In those anecdotal references, I suspect people are conflating the active mechanism with the passive (yet effective) effect of just powering the thing down for a few hours. Either that or just not being clear enough in what they mean.
 

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^^^ In those anecdotal references, I suspect people are conflating the active mechanism with the passive (yet effective) effect of just powering the thing down for a few hours. Either that or just not being clear enough in what they mean.
I wasn't having a go at you earlier, tgm - I credit you with being knowledgable about OLED and was surprised you were querying what had been said.

My understanding is that switching the TV off after a set period of use can engage the voltage cycle - and that, at least in the early sets, this took place before the TV powered down completely.

This is what I took Kaldaien to be describing. However, you're right - reading back, it does almost sound as if he's suggesting it happens periodically during the period when the TV is switched off which, likewise, is the first I've heard of this.

Desk
 

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I wasn't having a go at you earlier, tgm - I credit you with being knowledgable about OLED and was surprised you were querying what had been said.

My understanding is that switching the TV off after a set period of use can engage the voltage cycle - and that, at least in the early sets, this took place before the TV powered down completely.

This is what I took Kaldaien to be describing. However, you're right - reading back, it does almost sound as if he's suggesting it happens periodically during the period when the TV is switched off which, likewise, is the first I've heard of this.

Desk
Oh, no. That's not at at all what I meant. Maybe I should have phrased that "periodically while powering down". My understanding is what you described, but I've read that it only happens once for every 4 hours of runtime (this is the periodically I was referring to).
 
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