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Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I have a question I reckon you guys can answer. I recently purchased a Samsung 9000 series 3D TV.
I don't watch a lot of 3D content but have become very interested with a feature that utilizes the 3D technology. It's called DualPlay in the video game world and MultiView in the TV world. It's where one video/channel is on one shudder while another is on the other shudder. So two people can watch different shows or play two player games on the same screen, without PiP or split-screening. Which I think is an amazing technology.

Now, my TV doesn't technically have this feature built in like some more expensive TV's do, so I can't utilize this feature natively. I also don't currently have the glasses, but I can put Call of Duty for example into DualPlay mode, and see one screen with one eye and the other screen with the other. I plan to buy DualPlay glasses so I can play games. (Side question: Will non-powered DualPlay glasses work with my tv, which uses powered 3D glasses?) If the non-powered DualPlay glasses won't work I'll have to modify my powered 3D glasses, swapping out the lenses so I have one pair with two lefts and one pair with two rights.

Alright, my main question (finally!) is, Is there a program, or something I can do to format my own 3D video for use with this DualPlay technology? I just need to take two videos and essentially splitscreen them, putting one video on top of the other. So when I turn the 3D on it overlays one video over the other, just as it would with any 3D video.

This will be more for demonstrative purposes since I'd have to process every video for this, and there would either be audio for one video or no audio for anyone. But ever since I heard that this technology exists I've wanted to try it.

If anyone has a solution for the audio problem that'd be cool as well. Thank you for your answers and assistance! :)
 

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If you have a PC with nvidia you could try nvidia 3d vision player, otherwise steroescopic player gives some extra options. The players can play two separate files as left and right and would work on a monitor that runs 120Hz when connected to the PC. The tv runs at 60Hz but it might still work with nvidia 3d play (which you can buy from nvidia, or it come free when you have an emitter - just buy one of those). With these, you will get audio for either file but there are some extra options to play with.

You can get stereoscopic player and a muxer (to try and make your own SBS movies - dont think it will work properly unless they are the same length though, and its probably a tedious task) for trial at http://www.3dtv.at

If this does not work because of how the tv connects to the PC, then Total Media Theatre would be last chance. This should work on the tv similar to 3d play, but would only give audio for 1 source.

Only way I can think to play 2 audio files would be to get each file down to mono - then mux them as left right.

Have fun
 

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In answer to your question regarding {battery} powered vs. non-powered Dual Play glasses...

I'm afraid non-powered Dual Play glasses are for use with Passive 3D setups and will not work with setups using Active 3D.

If you do not want to go to the trouble of modding - and possibly butchering - a pair of your active 3D shutter glasses however, I'm pretty sure they make active versions already. Just Google/Bing/your-fave-search-engine for "Active Dual Play glasses".
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your answers guys.

So I went ahead and downloaded Nvidia 3D Vision Player from their website. It didn't ask me to pay for it, which I like. But after selecting the left and right video sources (mp4 format YouTube videos I downloaded to test this out) it came up with an error suggesting I didn't have the proper codecs. Instead of downloading all of them, since such things are very hit-or-miss for me, I downloaded Stereoscopic Player. Which seems to be the same exact thing as Nvidia 3D Vision Player... Except for the fact that it worked and didn't have any errors.
This program does let me play two videos side-by-side, which is exactly what I wanted. Woo-hoo!

While fiddling with this I realized turning on the 3D doubles the width of the screen (half is in the left lens, other half in the right) so I can simply open two windows of videos, or anything, and snap them to each side. When asking this question I didn't consider connecting my laptop to the TV and playing it directly from there. I figured I'd have to format the video and save it to a USB to play on the TV.

Connecting my laptop and playing the videos on it also solves the audio problem (In theory. I haven't actually tested it). I should be able to play one video in Windows Media Player and change the audio output settings to play on a pair of USB connected headphones. All audio outside of Windows Media Player will still play through the default audio device (a pair of headphones connected to the audio jack) So I can then play the second video in another video player and have both audios play through different pairs of headphones.

TL;DR:

HDMI a laptop to the Active 3D TV

Turn the 3D on side-by-side mode

Play one video through Windows Media Player (snapped to the left side of the screen) and configure the audio settings (in Windows Media Player) to play through your USB connected headphones

Play the other video through a different media player (snapped to the right side of the screen) and connect some standard headphones to the audio jack... Or just let it play through the speakers.


I'll update this thread in a week or so once I've modified my glasses and picked up some USB headphones. This is a nifty feature that has quite a few uses. If anyone can think of any cool uses for this technology do share them.
 

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Thanks for your answers guys.

So I went ahead and downloaded Nvidia 3D Vision Player from their website. It didn't ask me to pay for it, which I like. But after selecting the left and right video sources (mp4 format YouTube videos I downloaded to test this out) it came up with an error suggesting I didn't have the proper codecs. Instead of downloading all of them, since such things are very hit-or-miss for me, I downloaded Stereoscopic Player. Which seems to be the same exact thing as Nvidia 3D Vision Player... Except for the fact that it worked and didn't have any errors.
This program does let me play two videos side-by-side, which is exactly what I wanted. Woo-hoo!

While fiddling with this I realized turning on the 3D doubles the width of the screen (half is in the left lens, other half in the right) so I can simply open two windows of videos, or anything, and snap them to each side. When asking this question I didn't consider connecting my laptop to the TV and playing it directly from there. I figured I'd have to format the video and save it to a USB to play on the TV.

Connecting my laptop and playing the videos on it also solves the audio problem (In theory. I haven't actually tested it). I should be able to play one video in Windows Media Player and change the audio output settings to play on a pair of USB connected headphones. All audio outside of Windows Media Player will still play through the default audio device (a pair of headphones connected to the audio jack) So I can then play the second video in another video player and have both audios play through different pairs of headphones.

TL;DR:

HDMI a laptop to the Active 3D TV

Turn the 3D on side-by-side mode

Play one video through Windows Media Player (snapped to the left side of the screen) and configure the audio settings (in Windows Media Player) to play through your USB connected headphones

Play the other video through a different media player (snapped to the right side of the screen) and connect some standard headphones to the audio jack... Or just let it play through the speakers.


I'll update this thread in a week or so once I've modified my glasses and picked up some USB headphones. This is a nifty feature that has quite a few uses. If anyone can think of any cool uses for this technology do share them.
Stereoscopic Player allows you to select two separate video files and play them both simulataneously (intended for left and right eye views). If the files contain audio you can select which one to use the audio from. Iirc, you also have the option of outputting frame-packed 3D over HDMI, or other common 3D formats such as side by side and over-under. None of this requires anything from NVIDIA, or even an NVIDIA brand gfx card for that matter. It's my player of choice for stereo files playback to my TV for personal projects (3D Blu Ray player for everything else). Not sure if this helps; I may not be fully comprehending what you're trying to accomplish.
 
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