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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, because of a low ceiling, and some nagging ducts that cannot be moved, my wife and I have decided to paint the entire exposed ceiling in out basement. This includes the ducts, pipes, pvc, etc. The problem is that we have hardwood floors on our entire first floor, and by not finishing the ceiling, we are doing nothing to stop the sound from traveling up.


Can anyone think of some relatively low cost ideas to help stop some of the sound transmission. Right now, we just have the plywood with screws through it between the joists. I was thinking of maybe trying some rigid insulation covered by some kind of inexpensive wood, covered by fabric, glued up there...


Thanks!


Steve
 

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In my HT I had the same issues with the ducts running down the room, I boxed them in using 2x2 metal studs stuffed the Roxul Safe n Sound and in between the joists as well. Then I drywalled the duct and the walls but put drop ceiling for the rest of the ceiling.


For the drop ceiling I only lost 3" from the edge of the joist. I noticed on your picture there is water pipes also, I have a water pipe running to the outside - so before winter I can close the valve (which is in between the joist).


You can see the pics I have on the thread I started...

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=303084
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yeah, I tried that, with the 2x2 metal studs as well. There were a couple of problems with that. The first being under the soffit in the "theater" area would be only 6'1", and I'm 6'6". The second is the once the ceiling goes back up, the ducts get wider, and there is a support post that is adjacent to it, making the span too wide to make me feel comfortable with it holding drywall.


You theater is looking good!
 

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Yikes! Didn't know that your height of the room is only 6' and change, I thought my basement is low sitting at 7'4".


Best of luck to you, hope someone has some suggestions.:)
 

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Steve, I suggest using 2x4 steel studs on the flat, with the part that is horizontal attaching to the wall framing, and the vertical part attaching to pieces of wood installed between the ceiling joists like blocking.


You can create the corners by snipping the side flanges of the studs and bending them with the flat face on the outside. Screwing the overlaps would strengthen the bends and lock them at 90º (or another angle for slant-sided soffits).


If you prefer, you could have one of the ducts relocated to the other side, which would make it look more even, and might even create the illusion of the center ceiling being taller. Moving the pipes would be "easier" to do.
 

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Talk to an HVAC contractor. We have resized and relocated ductwork in cases just like this. I would suggest as Larry has mentioned relocating one duct (the return would be more feasible even though it is behind the feed duct) and resizing both to a wide and short dimension. You will need to find a contractor who has a sheet metal fabrication shop. Some will fabricate with "duct-board" which looks like rigid insulating sheets but that will take more room than thin sheet metal. The objective is to keep the interior volume of the ducts at a size that will suit the system. Get an estimate. He may have a solution that we cant see from the pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks for the framing tips. we are going to try the exposed ceiling thing first, since we can always cover it up later. One idea I had was to cover 14" wide planks with burlap, and rest tham on L-brackets in between the joists. I would then fill the joist covity above the plank with insulation.


I have primed all the ducts, we'll see how the painting turns out tonight...
 

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Owens Corning now makes a Solserene fabric ceiling, which

supposedly has an NRC of ~1. I was excited to see this, seeing

how I was in a similar situation with my HVAC and I-Beams in

my HT... but it's only available via professional installation.


I wound up doing a 2 level drop ceiling, with a 45 degree angled

section between the two levels. It was a hack, but in the end it

actually looks pretty cool. Luckilly the lower of the two sections

is only 6'11" where the higher section is 7'6"... so actual clearance

wasn't an issue. I just wanted to keep the headroom where I

could.


--

Tom
 

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How about attaching some 1 x 2's recessed about 2 inches or so on the side of the joists, fill the area above with the Roxul "safe" batts (use the 4 inch thick or better) The "safe" is the dense version of the mineral wool line. Then glue or staple 2 x 4 ft (cut to between the joists) acoustical tiles to the bottom edge of the 1 x 2s. Paint whatever color you want or just order black tiles. You could even do a double layer and stagger the seams if you wanted to for a little more tighter sealing of the cavity.


They cut pretty easy with a utility knife so getting them trimmed down to size won't be much of a problem.


Then just glue some of the same acoustical tiles to the metal ducts and paint to match the ceiling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
another though we are having is to fill the cavities with insulation, and cover the ceiling in burlap. we would then attach molding in a 'grid'. any ideas how to cover the ducts? is there something rigid i could glue to the ducts to then cover in the fabric?
 

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Have you looked into a product called Ceiling Max ? It's a clever way to install ceiling tiles without sacrificing valuable ceiling height. It uses a modular grid system that attaches directly to your floor joists. The ceiling tiles then snap into the grid system. It eliminates the need of using wire to suspend the grid, thus taking up what little extra ceiling height that you already have. Plus, you can never get the grid "too close" to the floor joists and not be able to install the ceiling panels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i would look into ceiling max but my wife does not like the drop ceiling look. my new challenge is to think og a way i can stretch the fabric around the ducts...
 
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