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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read several months worth of posts but I haven't found the information I'm looking for. I am in the process of building a theater in my basement and was planning on getting either a LCD or DLP projector. They both seem to have trade offs so I thought I would investigate CRT (I currently own a Tosh TW40x81 RPTV).


My room will be 14.5 x 25 and the ceiling will be approx 7'10" high. I was planning on a 100" 16:9 screen for the digital projector and I would like to stay with the same size screen if possible.


Here are my questions:


1.) Are there 16:9 CRT's and 4:3 CRT's?

2.) How far from the screen wall will the projector be?

3.) What is the normal operating life of the tubes?

4.) Is the setup/maintenance similar to my RPTV?


From what I have read so far the Sony G70 seems like a good choice. Anyone know how much a used goes for and what I should look for when buying a used projector?


Any other projector suggestions?


Thanks.


Gary
 

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I can try to answer your questions, but others more qualified will come along soon and correct me, I'm sure.


1. There are only 4:3 CRTs...they can produce 16:9 images by "squeezing" the raster into a 16:9 area on the 4:3 tube face. Suffice it to say, with CRT, you have the best of all worlds with regards to aspect ratio control, so this shouldn't be an issue for you.


2. Projector mounting distance is a factor of the screen size, screen shape and the type of projector you're going to use. Here's a link to Sony's throw distance calculator, PJCALC.EXE, which can help give you an idea on throw distances for various Sony projectors:

http://bpgprod.sel.sony.com/bpcconte...ml?appid=10009


For the G70 and a 100" 16:9 screen, the throw distance (i.e., the distance from the front of the projector to the top fo the screen) is 131". A number of Sony CRT gurus recommend that you actually get the CRT a little bit closer to maximize light output (brightness)--even so, 131" is a good, rough figure to work with.


3. Properly set up (without the contrast and brightness cranked beyond their optimal settings), a CRT can last up to 10,000 hours. Over the life of the CRT, the phosphors fade, reducing light output--and the CRT gets older, the picture will literally fade away, very slowly (vs. the digitals' light bulbs burning out quite suddenly). There are much more experienced people on this forum (e.g., William Phelps, Rgoer Galvin, Curt Palme) who can counsel you on this. Suffice it to say, unless you watch 24x7, you can get a LOT of quality time with a CRT.


4. Setting up a FPTV can be a chore, but once done properly, it is fairly easy to keep the picture "tweaked" (e.g., reconverging). This is one area where digital has CRT beat--if you want to open the box and fire up the projector, FPTV CRT is not for you. I have had a couple of CRT RPTVs, and really the only thing I did to them was to tweak the convergence--although I could have ISF'd them, I really just took them out of the box and lived with the picture quality. With FPTV CRT, it can take a solid day's worth of work to setup--and if you're not sure what you're doing, you're usually better off hiring a professional to do the setup (ISF calibration/tweaking can run $500 for just the basics to over $1,000 for near nirvana).


I will leave used G70 prices/expectations to someone else, although I have heard it's a great projector. You would also want to look at used Barco's (8xx series, I think), NECs (XG series), Electrohomes, etc. Search the forum for Curt Palme--he's Mr. Used CRT Guru. You can get a good understanding of your options if you define your budget and talk with him.


When buying used, the #1 thing to look for is uneven CRT wear--if someone didn't properly set the contrast/brightness or left a static image on the tubes too long, you will see "burn in." A little burn in you might be able to live with, but after a point, severe burn in will force you to replace the tubes, and that's major bucks. You can get a great deal going used, so long as you trust the seller (e.g., Curt).


One last thing--a 100" screen is probably too big for the CRT you're looking at (the G70). A 100" screen is really best served by a 9" CRT, and that's probably going to be out of your price range. If you're looking for best possible picture and you are looking at 7-8" CRTs (like the G70), I would recommend you drop down to a smaller screen--maybe 84" wide or 90". That will give you better light output, which will make the picture come alive. If you must have a 100" screen and you can't afford a 9" CRT, you might be disappointed in the end result...digital will give you a brighter picture in this case.
 

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Guys!


I concur with Alex regarding screen size; smaller will look punchier, crisper, with better color saturation. An 8" CRT is best viewed on a screen of 80" width or smaller, and that is under ideal controlled light conditions. There are good projectors available used, or used and retubed; with Sony believed to be exiting the business of building CRT projectors, and tubes that will be needed later, and with VDC telling us that Sony tubes cannot be rebuilt (?) one may want to consider a unit employing Matsushita (MEC) CRTs, such as a Barco or Electrohome Marquee.
 

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Sorry Tim, forgot to mention your name! Gary, Tim is a well thought of figure around these parts and a reputable purveyor of fine used/rebuilt CRT projectors.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by amillians
I can try to answer your questions, but others more qualified will come along soon and correct me, I'm sure.


1. There are only 4:3 CRTs...they can produce 16:9 images by "squeezing" the raster into a 16:9 area on the 4:3 tube face. Suffice it to say, with CRT, you have the best of all worlds with regards to aspect ratio control, so this shouldn't be an issue for you.


2. Projector mounting distance is a factor of the screen size, screen shape and the type of projector you're going to use. Here's a link to Sony's throw distance calculator, PJCALC.EXE, which can help give you an idea on throw distances for various Sony projectors:

http://bpgprod.sel.sony.com/bpcconte...ml?appid=10009


For the G70 and a 100" 16:9 screen, the throw distance (i.e., the distance from the front of the projector to the top fo the screen) is 131". A number of Sony CRT gurus recommend that you actually get the CRT a little bit closer to maximize light output (brightness)--even so, 131" is a good, rough figure to work with.


3. Properly set up (without the contrast and brightness cranked beyond their optimal settings), a CRT can last up to 10,000 hours. Over the life of the CRT, the phosphors fade, reducing light output--and the CRT gets older, the picture will literally fade away, very slowly (vs. the digitals' light bulbs burning out quite suddenly). There are much more experienced people on this forum (e.g., William Phelps, Rgoer Galvin, Curt Palme) who can counsel you on this. Suffice it to say, unless you watch 24x7, you can get a LOT of quality time with a CRT.


4. Setting up a FPTV can be a chore, but once done properly, it is fairly easy to keep the picture "tweaked" (e.g., reconverging). This is one area where digital has CRT beat--if you want to open the box and fire up the projector, FPTV CRT is not for you. I have had a couple of CRT RPTVs, and really the only thing I did to them was to tweak the convergence--although I could have ISF'd them, I really just took them out of the box and lived with the picture quality. With FPTV CRT, it can take a solid day's worth of work to setup--and if you're not sure what you're doing, you're usually better off hiring a professional to do the setup (ISF calibration/tweaking can run $500 for just the basics to over $1,000 for near nirvana).


I will leave used G70 prices/expectations to someone else, although I have heard it's a great projector. You would also want to look at used Barco's (8xx series, I think), NECs (XG series), Electrohomes, etc. Search the forum for Curt Palme--he's Mr. Used CRT Guru. You can get a good understanding of your options if you define your budget and talk with him.


When buying used, the #1 thing to look for is uneven CRT wear--if someone didn't properly set the contrast/brightness or left a static image on the tubes too long, you will see "burn in." A little burn in you might be able to live with, but after a point, severe burn in will force you to replace the tubes, and that's major bucks. You can get a great deal going used, so long as you trust the seller (e.g., Curt).


One last thing--a 100" screen is probably too big for the CRT you're looking at (the G70). A 100" screen is really best served by a 9" CRT, and that's probably going to be out of your price range. If you're looking for best possible picture and you are looking at 7-8" CRTs (like the G70), I would recommend you drop down to a smaller screen--maybe 84" wide or 90". That will give you better light output, which will make the picture come alive. If you must have a 100" screen and you can't afford a 9" CRT, you might be disappointed in the end result...digital will give you a brighter picture in this case.


I wouldn't waste time & money getting a set ISF calibtated. Not worth it IMO. Calla audio video store by you. Ask what a tech charges for setup. Also ask if anyone does it on the side. You can save money.

Also sets come with their own setup manuals. You can do it yourself.

And all the helpful people on this board will assist you if asked. Maybe a forum member lives near you?? Good luck!

Also I use a 100" screen with a Sony 1272. Has a fabulous picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Guys,


Thanks for all the great advice. Actually I was referring to a 100" diagonal size which is 87" wide so it falls into the ranges Alex gave me. Would I get a better picture on a 92" (80" wide) screen?


How important is light control? It will be in my basement which only has 1 small window so I have complete control over ambient light but when watching sports it would be nice to have some dimmed lights on.


Which Barco seems to be the most recommended? I had already sent Curt an email regarding a used projector and he seems to have some good prices on the 808. How would it compare to the Sony?


Thanks again.


Gary
 

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Hello Gary,


I was in the same situation you were a few months ago. I spent months reading on the forum.


And I was originally going to get a 65" rear projection TV untill that fate full day I met Curt Palme at a trade show.


And then I opened my eyes to the world of front projection.


Long story short after 12 months of saving and lots of research on this forum. I bought an NEC xg75 crt projector from Curt Palme.


And I chose that projector over the Barco 1208. I looked at both NEC Xg series & Barco 1208. And I thought the Nec had better colors, but the Barco was still spectacular.


Curt is a great guy to deal with. He has some Barco 1208 and 808's. But I believe he has an NEC Xg 110 which scans higher than mine. I believe the Xg 110 is the OEM projector for the Runco 991ultra.


I did buy a Quadscan scaler to go with my Nec projector. But I just upgraded and replaced it with a Faroudja NR scaler and I am very happy.


My room measures 15ft long, 13ft wide with only a 7.5ft ceiling. Having good light control is best with CRT. And maybe painting the ceiling and walls a darker color is better as well.


Just my 2cents, Brian
 

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I am also interested in a new or used projector. Anyone know how to contact Curt?
 

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Warren,

Sent you a PM
 

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Gary,

I run a G70 through a HTPC at 960p for DVD playback and use a DISH 6000 receiver at 720P for HDTV. I am projecting on a 1.3 gain screen and one word describes the picture.....stunning. I regularly sell G-70's with very low hours on them and the generally go for $5500 - $6000.

But I am really confused about the screen sizes that are regularly mentioned on this forum. I am projecting on to a 106 x 60, 16:9 screen in a light controlled room, and never have to turn the contrast above 80 or the brightness above 45. The picture is always very bright and I don't believe that I am overdriving the CRT's. And because I don't like to watch movies in complete darkness, I do have some lighting on in the room. Granted the unit only has 250 hrs on it, but still, an 80" screen for a G-70??I seems small to me. I regularly set up 1271's and 1272's at 92 x 52 and without overdriving them the picture looks plenty bright to me.
 

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i concur ...i have a weak little 1270 and i ran it at [email protected]

on a 52x92 screen. picture is great . i refuse to believe that the colossal G70 cant outperform mine ...G70 can do 100" wide with out breaking a sweat
 
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