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I'm looking for a higher end RPTV and want to know what are the advantages/disadvantages of each. I know that DLP is very popular in FP, but how about RP?


TIA.
 

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A broad question, but basically the biggest difference in CRT and the other technologies are the lack of a true black with DLP and LCD. Black is actually the absence of light and only CRT can create that, for now.
 

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The new higher contrast levels that texas instruments has produced in their 2002 DLP chips is 1200:1 which will provide much blacker blacks than last year's models. The samsung 50" DLP at the CES did a fine job of this and the blacks were not noticibly lighter than CRT RPTVs.


The advantage of no burn in on DLPs and LCoS and ability to pose as a widescreen computer monitor at resolutions to 1280 x 720 (or 1920 x 1080 next year) will far out weigh the slightly blacker black that the CRT can produce. Granted the CRT is about 1/3 the cost of the DLP / LCoS but that will not be for long. DLPs and LCoS will dominate the RP HDTV market in the coming years.


As far as LCD RPTV, forget it. It's old technology. I wouldn't invest in it. A direct view LCD such as the 16:9 24" samsung synchmaster 240t is pretty nifty, but doesn't qualify as a 'bigscreen'.
 

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Hey Sawyer,


I sure am getting tired of checking this forum only find no new DLP RPTV's shipping yet!


How about you?

I got me a 36" DirectView HDTV to tide me over, but I"m getting tired of waiting.

I keep feeling the lure of plasma's great PQ and find myself saying "maybe burnin isn't really a concern..."


:)

Ken
 

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For my money, the main distinction between the three technologies is picture quality. LCD's (and to a lesser extent DLP's) tend to produce a mesh effect (a black border surrounding each image pixel), which some find distracting, especially when viewing video sources. In contrast the nature of CRT's is such that the demarkation of lines and pixels is less noticeable. What is noticeable on CRT displays is scan lines, which are sometimes equally distracting. However nowadays this effect is less pronouced (esp. on HDTV's), due to increases in the number of lines of resolution compared to older CRT displays. The colour contrast/accuracy is sometimes superior in CRT displays than in comparable LCD/DLP projectors. DLP projectors are undoubtedly preferable to LCD projectors in most respects.


That said, the definition of individual pixels using LCD/DLP technology is often higher than is acheivable via a comparable CRT display. In other words, reading small text on a LCD/DLP display will be far preferable to reading text via a CRT display (typically). There is often a fuzziness or "soft focus" effect on all but the very high-end CRT displays.


The extent to which a viewer is distracted by the limitations of the display technology depends on the type of image sources being displayed, as well as the highly subjective impact of those limitations. The mesh effect may be highly distracting to some, but not others. Similarly the lack of pixel definition on CRT displays may actually improve the appearance of some video sources -with it's inherent "smoothing" out of other image artefacts such as noise and flicker.


And so I guess, at the end of the day, your best bet is to choose your budget and compare the technologies side-by-side in a showroom setting, because there isn't really a clear winner.


My socks were blown-off when viewing a Mits DLP RPTV in a showroom, but I am also a very happy owner on a CRT-based RPTV. Alas, the DLP was outside my budget at the time.


I hope this helps!


Mike.
 

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My socks were blown off too when I found out how much Mits will be asking for their 2002 65" DLP RPTV: $17,500. They've got to be out of their tree to think anyone will pay that when a 50" DLP samsung is $4500 or a 57" Toshiba LCoS will go between $5000-10,000.


As far as release dates, the manufacturer reps I spoke with at the CES said "summer" for release on the new DLPs and most 2002 models. This is in the annual anticipation of the football season purchases made in august / september when HDTVs move.


I, myself, am patiently awaiting the arrival of the toshiba mentioned above, model # 57HLX82 which is due out in the fall. This will be the hottest HDTV on the planet: it will resolve 1920 x 1080p @ 60 Hz all day long. No burn in. No uneven phosphor wear. No 'screen door' mesh effect mentioned above. This is the direction that the RP HDTV market will go. It is just going to be slow to get to that inflection point.


Good luck.
 

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FYI from prezentation magazine

looks like more DLP engines are comming soon.

Artur

1. IN-VISION AND LIESEGANG TEAM UP

Two European companies are joining forces to develop a short-throw

projection engine for rear-projection displays. In-Vision, a well-known

European manufacturer of optical systems, and Liesegang, the German

projector manufacturer, recently announced their alliance to develop,

manufacture and market the new DLP-based engine, called the RPE-X 1. The

new engine, which will project a 50-inch image from as close as 32 inches,

is designed for rear-projection displays measuring between 50 inches and

84 inches. The two companies will demo the RPE-X 1 engine at the Infocomm

2002 trade show in Las Vegas next month. The first production units are

expected in Q4 of this year and will be sold on an OEM basis to projector

manufacturers in the United States, Europe and Asia.
 

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Hi all,

it may also interest you chaps that it was announced that LG Electronics are teaming up with Texas Instruments to manufacture DLP RP sets in Europe - don't know about States. So yet another company will be using the TI chips. They will start at 43" this year Q3, then go up to 50" next year with XGA resolution. The upshot really does appear to be that DLP RP is to be a reality big time. Plus the pricing for these is suppose to be comparable to CRT similar sizes onward, so this could have major effects for plasma also.

LG has been known in the UK longer than in the US, I think, but is making inroads there/here too. It is known to be more of a low end manufacturer for TV type products, but the linkage with the TI chip should presume their sets to be worth looking out for with regard to this technologys' development/proliferation, at the least in the very near and real future.

The fact that there is no screen burn issues is a very pleasing prospect. I have nearly pulled the trigger on getting a plasma several times of late and can't make up my mind what to do? The wait for what's what is a pain in the nethers.
 

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Be careful about projection TV with short throw optics. You will have to look more closely for things like chromatic aberration (somewhat resembles misconvergence) and geometry problems such as pincushion distortion, and inability to focus both the center and edges at the same time.


Video hints:
http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
 

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sawyer: I translated this with Babelfish from a German site:

Quote:
Toshiba back projector: The model 57HLX82 was pointed in this form to the CES 2002. It works with 1.280 times 720 pixels on three LCoS panels and is to cost under 10,000 dollar. To Germany it comes probably not in this version, but directly with lasers as source of light.
It has a native resolution of 1280 x 720, not 1920 x 1080. It'll have to scale down 1920 x 1080 to 1280 x 720. The German site says that Toshiba will use not only LCoS panels but also lasers as a lightsource!


http://www.loehneysen.de/#154


EDIT: Never mind, i just found this... http://www.***************.com/ubb/u...;f=21;t=005515
 

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Anyone hear anything about the new samsung dlp's? I am anxiously awaiting trying out the 43 inch dlp. I have a cabinet that can fit a 46 inch wide, 32 inch tall and up to 30 inches deep and desire very much to replace my 4:3 31 inch tv with a tv that can fit this cabinet.


The samsung 43inch should fit great. A plasma is also an idea but not sure i want to deal with burn in issues of a plasma, xbox and all...


Anyway anyone have any info on the samsungs or anything similar?
 

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Cinder,


I've been looking all over for information on the Samsung DLP sets, and all I can find is the same info that was in the original press release. If anyone knows anything more than that, they aren't talking. At this point, I don't think the model numbers for these sets are even known yet, and Samsung customer service says they have to have a model number to be able to look up availability information.
 

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I was starting to think that this unit was never going to appear. Having just read through the PDF, i am thinking that this unit might be the one to finally bring me over to the dark side. I've been close several times to pulling the trigger on a 42 plasma but max 480 lines, burnin and no DVI have been playing with my mind. Any more impressions from CES attendees on this unit or the 43 incher?


BTW the new 40 inch panasonic LCD RPTV is on line at best buy now....
 

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This is indeed good news! At least someone at Samsung thinks they're close to shipping. Perhaps with the memory of the failed fLCD's Samsung will be working overtime to make sure this new DLP set happens.


From reports here on the forum, TI is closely involved with all of these new DLP's and so success is as assured as possible.


As soon as someone spys one of these babies in action be on the lookout for optical distortion. Someone here has warned of this distortion as a byproduct of such short-throw projection.


Here's my short list of things to look for in this set:


1. Optical distortion

2. View angle

3. Scaler performance


I'm fairly confident that the image qualities like contrast and resolution will be excellent. The existing DLP RPTV's (Panny 52) look good except for the blacks that this new generation should excell at.


Ken
 

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From the TI press release:

Quote:
The Samsung pre-production units feature screen sizes of 43" and 50" ... Anticipated price for the 43" model is $3,999.99 (MSRP) and for the 50" model is $4,499.99 (MSRP).
This is a great price point for this technology. Has anyone seen any contrast ratio numbers for the new DLP chips? I don't share KenLands optimism on the contrast.


Yes, it has DVI but is there a way to upgrade the software so that it can actually support copy protection? (This is a rhetorical question).


OK, I found this which I think is the new generation judgin by the date.

Quote:
Apr. 10, 2002) -- Texas Instruments announced that its DLP technology has been selected by Hewlett-Packard Company for their HP Digital Projectors xb31 and sb21.


The HP Digital Projector xb31 weighs only 3.4lbs and delivers 1,500 lumens of brightness at XGA resolution; the HP Digital Projector sb21 weighs only 2.2lbs, and offers 1,000 lumens at SVGA resolution. Both projectors deliver the clear, sharp images for which DLP technology is renowned, with a 1,800:1 contrast ratio - the highest of any projector yet delivered.
Note that the previous generation plasmas were all about 500:1 which is the quoted contrast ratio of the previous generation DLPs. ALthough Pannasonic quotes 3000:1 in the latest generation it is widely regarded as being in the 1500:1 range.


If this unit can produce 1800:1 contrast ratio in a 50 inch set for $4,500 the only thing left is to convince my wife....
 

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I would not be surprised to see the Samsung set ship with DVI/HDCP. They certainly hinted it might at CES and the longer it takes to ship, the more likely it will have HDCP.


I must say, though, that I doubt the picture is going to appear noticeably more crisp than a 480 plasma. For my money, the likelihood of that is low.


I am jazzed about these new DLP sets and the new Panasonic set because I think the heating up of competition in the 42-50 range, the proliferation of technological options, the chance to show off the value of HD, the low-profile form factors, etc. are all good news.


Mark
 
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