AVS Forum banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,651 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The June, 2015 issue of Sound and Vision has an article (that's not on their site) discussing curved TVs, State of the Arc - Curved screens are here, but why?

The primary reason all involved agree is aesthetics.

Samsung claims it's more immersive based on some research and that a curved TV has a bigger "sweet spot."

LG also says aesthetics but is using curved to denote OLED in the US as they sell curved LCDs overseas but will not be bringing them here, primarily because they have issues with curved IPS but don't see those problems with curved OLED; they also claim improved immersiveness. (Alas, LG's Tim Alessi says nothing about flat OLEDs but calls curved vs. flat "a personal choice.")

Vizio thinks curved sets are a joke and refuse to produce them.

Chinese vendors Hisense and TCL "have curved screens on their 2015 roadmaps" but are waiting to see how the market plays out before committing.

The article goes on to say that Samsung is likely using curved to push themselves as a premium brand, as to maintain "premium pricing" as "curved panels carry a 20 to 30 percent premium."

Retailers such as Best Buy and hhgregg call curved TVs more immersive and "IMAX-like."

Best Buy claims customers are beginning to seek out curved in particular.

The bottom line is all involved are hoping people looking for top of the line TVs will just seek out the curved ones and will pay more for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
789 Posts
best buy salesman when I was there yesterday was telling everyone it improves viewing angles from the sides. There were at least 3 people that asked about why they would want a curved screen in the 30 mins I was there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,651 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
While that may conceivably be true for LCD, it's nonsense for an emissive technology like OLED.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,651 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Another gimmick to add additional margin by TV manufacturers.
Precisely - as they said, aesthetics and an attempt to teach consumers that the GOOD TVs are the curved ones.

As has been mentioned on several forums, people won't pay a premium for better picture quality, so perhaps they can be convinced to pay extra for curved if told the "best" TVs are curved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,688 Posts
My favorite thing is that when people speak out about curved screens they are called "traditionalists" or "purists" as if only more progressive people can see the "value" of the curved screen.

The first time I saw a curved screen I thought it was an awesome idea so I sat in front of it for a while at the store. After a few minutes I started trying to figure out how this was better. I couldn't find anything that made it better so I asked the sales person at the store and was informed that it had better viewing angles and improved immersion. It took about 30 seconds to disprove the better viewing angles thing.

At this point having seen quite a few different curved sets I think it is purely a matter of personal preference. I do not believe there are any technical benefits to the design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,714 Posts
My favorite thing is that when people speak out about curved screens they are called "traditionalists" or "purists" as if only more progressive people can see the "value" of the curved screen.

The first time I saw a curved screen I thought it was an awesome idea so I sat in front of it for a while at the store. After a few minutes I started trying to figure out how this was better. I couldn't find anything that made it better so I asked the sales person at the store and was informed that it had better viewing angles and improved immersion. It took about 30 seconds to disprove the better viewing angles thing.

At this point having seen quite a few different curved sets I think it is purely a matter of personal preference. I do not believe there are any technical benefits to the design.
I have been one of the leading 'haters' of this entire curved screen nonsense and especially Samsung's big-muscled effort to steer the entire market towards curved TVs the way they steered it towards thin (and edge-lit) TVs a few years ago.

There are no benefits to curved screens for an emissive display such as an OLED, though there is unfortunaley a small technical benefit associated with increasing the size of the sweet-spot for LCD TVs (especially VA-type).

I hate the idea of distorting a perfectly good flat image for no reason and go ballistic at the idea of having to pay more for it or having no choice.

All that being said, I have had a curved 55EC9300 in my living room for 6 days now and over that time, I have learned two things:

1/ I do not even notice the curve while watching content. It is totally invisible to me and only if I consciously pull myself out of 'watching/enjoying/immersion' mode and consciously look for lines that are not perfectly straight as they would be on a flat screen can I even detect anything at all when watching in the dark.

2/ I have had 4 females spanning three generations (daughter, wife, mother, friend) look at the 55EC9300 in the living room while off and all 4 of them has said that it looks much better than a flat TV.

My wife has always objected to the 'large black rectangle' in our living room and insists on covering it up with a TV-cozy (cloth drape). With the 55EC9300, she thinks the TV looks good as a piece of furniture / part of the room and is considering leaving it uncovered.

Whether Samsung had the genius to realize that the true value of a curved TV is improved WAF or not, if a slight curve of the screen allows for easier acceptance in my home of a larger 'near-flatscreen' TV, count me as one of the most vocal critics of the concept who is now all for it :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,714 Posts
My favorite thing is that when people speak out about curved screens they are called "traditionalists" or "purists" as if only more progressive people can see the "value" of the curved screen.

The first time I saw a curved screen I thought it was an awesome idea so I sat in front of it for a while at the store. After a few minutes I started trying to figure out how this was better. I couldn't find anything that made it better so I asked the sales person at the store and was informed that it had better viewing angles and improved immersion. It took about 30 seconds to disprove the better viewing angles thing.

At this point having seen quite a few different curved sets I think it is purely a matter of personal preference. I do not believe there are any technical benefits to the design.
I thought the same thing when viewing in the store.

It is subtle and only true with a VA-type LCD like one of the Samsungs. You need to align yourself just outside one edge of the TV and walk straight forward gating at the far edge of the TV until you notice color shift. If you measure that 'distance to visible color shift' comparing two equally-sized VA-type LCDs, you will see that you can come a bit closer with the curved screen. Easier to see at home in the dark than on the bright showroom floor, but if you are able to detect color shift under those conditions, you should be able to confirm.

With emmissive displays like OLED which have fantastic off-angle viewing performance anyway, the curve will add nothing at all.

But it does unfortunately allow you to watch a large curved Samsung VA-type LED/LCD from closer than you can watch a similar-sized flat Samsung VA-type LED/LCD (if you can find one - they are becoming a rare breed ;-).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,688 Posts
I thought the same thing when viewing in the store.

It is subtle and only true with a VA-type LCD like one of the Samsungs. You need to align yourself just outside one edge of the TV and walk straight forward gating at the far edge of the TV until you notice color shift. If you measure that 'distance to visible color shift' comparing two equally-sized VA-type LCDs, you will see that you can come a bit closer with the curved screen. Easier to see at home in the dark than on the bright showroom floor, but if you are able to detect color shift under those conditions, you should be able to confirm.
How close were you to the TV when you saw the benefit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
I have been one of the leading 'haters' of this entire curved screen nonsense ...
What brought you in the first place to the hater camp?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,714 Posts
How close were you to the TV when you saw the benefit?
Most people can see color shift on a VA-type LCD beginning at 20 degrees off-axis and almost always by 30 degrees off axis.

Lined up at one edge of a 16:9 flat-screen TV, 30-degrees off-axis from the far edge of thevTV corresponds to about 1.5 screen diagonals (or 1-3/4 screen widths) while 20-degrees off-axis corresponds to about 2.4 screen diagonals (or 2-3/4 screen widths).

So if you begin by positioning yourself just outside of one edge of the screen and about 3 screen-widths back and walk slowly towards the screen, you should find yourself noticing color shift on the far edge of the screen before getting halfway to the screen...

Of course, color shift is much easier to detect when a photo-realistic static image is being displayed versus a vivid demo loop, so you may want to bring a thumb-drive with you to perform this test ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,651 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
What brought you in the first place to the hater camp?
For me it's the same silliness as watching a non-rectified print on curved movie screen - all straight lines become curves and distortion is constant.

Is it noticeable while watching content? Perhaps no more than watching an uncalibrated TV.

But if accuracy is at all important to you (and I doubt you'd be shopping OLED otherwise), it's an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
My take is that when OLED was starting to just come out (several years ago) the sets were made curved because it was relatively easy to do so with that technology. Curved OLEDs gave something tangible (beyond PQ/IQ) for joe-6-pack consumers to see that OLED was a "new" substantial innovation in technology and thus different from LCD/LED flat screens and their mere incremental advancements.

Then as Samsung ditched OLED it knew that it had to obfuscate the curved OLED distringuishing mark from competition (LG). So Samsung's marketing machine drove engineering to create the curve; mostly I believe to create product confusion between OLED and LCD/LED. I give a lot of credit to Samsung's marketing team for these kinds of tactics, sucky as they are for the consumer. Its also a pretty famous strategic marketing case study that designers at Samsung often drive product development and engineering.

And so now we are here doing mostly just that and its also morphed a bit to be an "aesthetics" gimmick as well.

That is my interpretation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,714 Posts
What brought you in the first place to the hater camp?
I hate the curve because it does nothing to improve picture quality (the one exception being for VA-type LCDs) and if overdone can seriously distort it, I find the marketing hooey and misinformation being spewed about curved screens objectionable, and I have a visceral dislike of Samsung because of their strong-arm marketing tactics that steer the market away from true picture quality, first from several years ago when they shifted the TV market away from FALD and towards 'thin' (meaning edge-lit) and now with both this curved TV nonsense as well as their recent UHD Alliance to slow down what Dolby, Vizio, Warner Bros. and VUDU had been teeing up.

All that being said, with 4 women who have seen my 55EC9300 stating that the curve makes it look much better than any of our earlier flat-screen TVs (including LG 55LW5600, Panasonic 65ZT60, and Vizio P70), I need to grudgingly acknowledge that LG's decision to add a mild curve to the 55EC9300 has made it easier for me to have a large flat-screen television in my living room without distorting the picture quality when viewing in the dark in a noticable/objectionable way, and so has delivered value to me.

The curve is not about picture quality, increased viewing angles, or feeling more relaxed when watching as Samsung markets. It is about improved aesthetics which, while close to worthless in a man-cave, is a tangible value to those of us living in shared space with others who do not share our passion for picture quality, but do have an opinion about which TV fits in the household from a furniture / pure object aesthetics point of view.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
But if accuracy is at all important to you (and I doubt you'd be shopping OLED otherwise), it's an issue.
Realism is very important to me, but the problem I have always had with the reasoning you use here is that "accuracy" is being measured by comparison to what you'd see on a flat screen. So it's circular. Flat is better because it's more accurate, and it's more accurate because it's flat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,651 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Then as Samsung ditched OLED it knew that it had to obfuscate the curved OLED distringuishing mark from competition (LG). So Samsung's marketing machine drove engineering to create the curve; mostly I believe to create product confusion between OLED and LCD/LED. I give a lot of credit to Samsung's marketing team for these kinds of tactics, sucky as they are for the consumer. Its also a pretty famous strategic marketing case study that designers at Samsung often drive product development and engineering.
The Sound and Vision article quotes IHS Technology's Paul Gagnon as effectively making the same argument:

OLED has been a topic of great interest by both Samsung and LG. Both companies have been talking about it as the next generation of display technology for many years. I think it's quite clear at this point that LG has figured OLED out with their solution, but for Samsung, it's back to the drawing board. So rather than cede new technology to LG, they've become one of the leaders of being able to do curved LCDs. And, oh, by the way, it's quite difficult for LG to curve LCDs because of the IPS panel technology they use.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
536 Posts
It's only curved to be stylish.

Take a look at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wife_acceptance_factor


Essentially, 88% of electronic purchases are influenced by women in some way. A tv is much more likely to be sold if it has better features in regards to style and cable management.


Hnestly you don't notice the curve, even when you use it as a PC monitor. The only annoying issue with it is, you have to be slightly closer to it to see the full benefit of 1080p and the sides you will see pixels, because the screen caves in. This is only for serious people though, who want that perfect FOV and optimal viewing distance.
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top