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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erich H  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/30#post_24613424


That's Sir PI to all of us around here!


He did win the DIY Sound Group 'Best Build' award 2 years in a row!*













* - I just now made that decision.

I forgot he was Knighted Sir PI a few years ago, The Duke of Woodworkology



I deserve a public lashing in the town square for not referring to him properly, please accept my humble apologies Sir PI
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martycool007  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build#post_24612305


I have a general question that I would like to ask you woodworking guys as I am totally new to this...


When it comes to measuring and marking the cutting lines on various pieces of wood, do you just use a tape measure and trust your freehand marking skills by the line on the tape measure? I am having trouble marking accurate, repeated lines using a tape measure. Is there a better way to ensure that you mark the same lines multiple times?


Also, I am having trouble cutting exact sized panels, which I believe is also a product of not marking exact lines. Do you guys cut with the blade right on the line?

For 12" or less very accurate lines I use this which I learned about from Sir PassingInterests many informative build threads: http://www.amazon.com/Incra-T-RULE12-12-Inch-Precision-Marking/dp/B00004TRBX/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1397668352&sr=8-2&keywords=incra+precision+t-rule

It is a little pricey but I use it all the time and it's an great tool to have around the shop.


If you're new to woodworking you should really take some time to look through Sir Passinginterest's builds as I know I and a lot of others around here have learned a ton from him. He really takes his time to show how he does his amazing work and it is the best DIY class you can take. Here is a link to the threads he started: http://www.avsforum.com/newsearch/?advanced=1&sort=lastupdate&order=descending&type=35&createdbyuserid[]=7671342
 

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Discussion Starter #45

Quote:
Originally Posted by chalugadp  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build#post_24612053


When I have done curved pieces I always have used thin pieces and curve around a base.

With what you have I would take a belt sander to it.

Do you think the belt sander would eat right through? Thats why I haven't tried it yet...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by realtight  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/30#post_24615340

Quote:
Originally Posted by chalugadp  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build#post_24612053


When I have done curved pieces I always have used thin pieces and curve around a base.

With what you have I would take a belt sander to it.

Do you think the belt sander would eat right through? Thats why I haven't tried it yet...

If you have 120 grit and are good with the belt sander it's a 5 minute job. Just blending in the seams. I wouldn't do it with 80 grit. Like u said too easy to eat through. With a palm sander it's a 30 minute job. Sounds like you have the skill for this. Just take it easy and do 30 seconds at a time and stop and check.

 

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Discussion Starter #47

Quote:
Originally Posted by chalugadp  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/30#post_24615408


If you have 120 grit and are good with the belt sander it's a 5 minute job. Just blending in the seams. I wouldn't do it with 80 grit. Like u said too easy to eat through. With a palm sander it's a 30 minute job. Sounds like you have the skill for this. Just take it easy and do 30 seconds at a time and stop and check.


I'm going to give it a try, just need to pick up some lighter paper. Hopefully I'll have some updates this weekend!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cessna1466u  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/30#post_24613144


I think a lot of this is personal preference. I do use a tape measure, always measure twice. I draw a line with sharp pencil then if the board is a long one I measure again about half way up and then 3/4 way up. Put little marks and then use that and a square to make the cut line. I always cut on the line. If you have more than a couple of boards to cut with the same measurements I make a jig. It takes a few more minutes but at least you know that your cuts will be the same.


As far as cutting exact size panels are you using a table saw? Could your fence be moving on you? If just using a circular saw then make a jig, use extra scraps or clamped down squares to make a straight edge.

Thanks for the help guys!

What I am having trouble with, in particular, is cutting say a 2ft by 4ft panel perfectly into a 2ft by 2ft panel, and doing other similar cutting. I like those precision measurement t tools that you guys linked above, and may very well pick up some of those when I have the spare cash.


One thing that would definitely help is if I could learn to properly use a flush trim bit in my router. I bought one recently and never could figure out how to properly make it cut the tops of my panels flush without eating large holes in top of the panels. Wrt using a flush trim but, do you need to clamp a straight edge to rest the bearing on when trimming? If so, do you have to re measure and adjust the clamped on straight edge for each panel??
 

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Definitely try to do the cross cut sled but I am assuming you don't have a table saw? If you do, build the sled and or any other jigs you can find. I have jigs to cut 45degree angles, small pieces, large extended pieces. The best part about these jigs is that you normally just make them with scrap wood you have laying around, so its cheap.


As far as the flush trim bit. I personally like the bottom bearing one. Make sure the bearing is free and clear, runs smooths and is not junked up with glue. Then I like to drop the bit just enough to barely clear the wood I am cutting. Sometimes it even leaves a super thin sliver of wood on there. I have never had a problem with gouging when I do it this way.
 

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I build my cross cut sleds with only 1 guide rail as opposed to the traditional 2 rails. That way you only have to make sure the back stop is perpendicular to the blade and not worry about both rails also being perfectly parallel. Just a suggestion....
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDean  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/30#post_24616959


I build my cross cut sleds with only 1 guide rail as opposed to the traditional 2 rails. That way you only have to make sure the back stop is perpendicular to the blade and not worry about both rails also being perfectly parallel. Just a suggestion....

I did the same to start. Glued and pin nailed first runner. Then I used a spray adhesive to get the second one lined up perfectly. the spray adhesive gave me wiggle room to get it in place but still hold. Carefully lifted up and pin nailed it down. Now both run true.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martycool007  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/30#post_24616122


Thanks for the help guys!

What I am having trouble with, in particular, is cutting say a 2ft by 4ft panel perfectly into a 2ft by 2ft panel, and doing other similar cutting. I like those precision measurement t tools that you guys linked above, and may very well pick up some of those when I have the spare cash.


One thing that would definitely help is if I could learn to properly use a flush trim bit in my router. I bought one recently and never could figure out how to properly make it cut the tops of my panels flush without eating large holes in top of the panels. Wrt using a flush trim but, do you need to clamp a straight edge to rest the bearing on when trimming? If so, do you have to re measure and adjust the clamped on straight edge for each panel??
 

Regarding using a tape measure.  A tape measure will never replace those nice precision measurement tools but when I need to use a tape measure for finer work I use the 1" trick.  You line up the edge of the board with the 1" mark and then measure to your desired measurement +1 inch.  That helps with precision.  A lot of people don't know the little hook at the end of the tape measure is suppose to move a little to compensate for the thickness of the clasp when doing an inside or outside measurement.  Inside measurement you want to push the hook and tape together and for an outside measurement you want to pull on it so it's fully extended.  Always use the same tape measure during your project because they can be different.

 

Like others have said, for repeated similar cuts, you need a table saw or some sort of jig/straight edge.  Measuring, marking and cutting over and over again usually won't get you the consistency you want.  If you use a straight edge and circular saw, you want the edge of the circular saw that is closest to the blade to ride up against the straight edge.  This keeps the circular saw cutting towards the straight edge and prevents it from wandering away from where you want to cut.

 

Throw away the miter gauge that came with your table saw and build a Crosscut sled. 

 

Regarding your flush trimming bit.  If you're cutting into the panels that you are trying to make flush with the cabinet you are either 1) tilting the router as you trim or 2) using a top bearing bit instead of a bottom bearing bit.  You need a bottom bearing bit that rolls along the surface that you want your over sized panel to be flush trimmed to.

 

That's it for my tips.
 

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Thanks, again, for the help guys! Yes, I do have a table saw, and although I have no problem making repeated from say a sheet of ply, it's the individual cuts that sometimes goof me up. What is a crosscut sled? Is this something to push the wood through the saw blade with? My table saw is an older Black & Decker, and is very wide. It's actually as wide or wider than anything you can get at Lowes or Hone Depot. It works just fine and seems to be going strong. I have an older Craftsman too that I don't use because it's so small. At some point I want to build a DIY table saw using the Craftsman motor and also a DIY router table when I get better.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Minor update. Belt sander worked, also used a regular sander to finish it off. You can still see the kerf marks but it is smooth to the touch. I've sealed the mdf and am going to start veering next weekend.


Here is a pic with a scrap piece of leftover laminate taped to it.

 

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Discussion Starter #59

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChopShop1  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/30#post_24631251


These are going to be rediculous RT! I can't wait to see them finished. I still can't get over how much I love that curved front baffle too.

Thanks Chop! Yeah, even the wife is on board and said she can't wait for them to be done.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by realtight  /t/1527379/curved-seos-tempest-build/0_100#post_24631227


Minor update. Belt sander worked, also used a regular sander to finish it off. You can still see the kerf marks but it is smooth to the touch. I've sealed the mdf and am going to start veering next weekend.


Here is a pic with a scrap piece of leftover laminate taped to it.

 

Just wanted to say thanks for posting pics like this.  It's inspiring to see the quality work that others do!  

 

Keep it up / Im sure we are all looking forward to seeing the journey/progress continue : )
 
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