AVS Forum banner

1261 - 1280 of 1293 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
hi.. very new here but i see alot of ppl here talk about DTD calculator program.

My laptop uses Toshiba Intel graphics and im running a vga to component cord my hdtv but the resolutions dont match. So Im trying to edit my computers resolution ratios to work with my tv.


With DTD i got as far as decodeing my own EDID s but I dont know what to do after that. My TV only uses 720x480 and 1920x1080 but intel doesnt offer these resolutions,, and no update for my graphics driver is avail. can someone help thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I have Lenovo IdeaPad S10e and Display1_DownScalingSupported from 0″ to 1″ doesn't work.

The modification works, but the screen becomes horizontally stretched as expected, because the aspect ratio is different: originally 1024x576 - ratio 1.78 (1024:576=1.78) while 1024×768 px and 1152×864 have very different ratio.

SO: how to modify the driver so that to change the max resolution, for example, to 1152x648 ???

I tried everything with DTD Calculator without any success!

Please for any help, idea and suggestion!

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
I have an Intel Inspiron e1405 (Intel 945 chipset) hooked up to a Panasonic P50G10 via VGA (from my laptop's VGA into my TV's VGA).


My laptop offers me 1280x768 resolution, which the TV supports. However, the image is stretched horizontally, and about 1/3 of the desktop on the right side is cut off. The weird thing is that, when I drag my mouse to the part of the desktop that is not visible, the whole screen automatically scrolls horizontally to that side.


How can I use DTD calculator to squeeze the image horizontally (think anamorphic) so that I will have 1:1 pixel mapping? I spent about 3 hours messing around with DTD Calculator to no avail.


I was able to get a newer Dell laptop to work just fine with my TV, so I know the issue is on the e1405's end.


Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have an Intel HD 3000 on-board graphics card and I tried everything correctly you said on the first post but I cannot make it work. When I reboot after the registry hack step and I'm trying to apply the custom resolution I just made the TV just goes blank another question I got is why I cannot click the apply button (is disabled) when I'm into the Ruler after the Create modeline step? any help appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
the dtd calculator tool tells me that it cant detect my intel graphics registry key im using an intel 82865g onboard graphics how do i fix this so i can use the program
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi!


I was trying to add a custom resolution to my list of resolutions in the hope that a lower resolution that adhered to my monitor's aspect ratio (16:10) would be less taxing on the graphics hardware and enable me to play some games with a higher framerate. Alas, all my efforts to use the DTD Calculator to add custom resolutions to my computer have been unsuccessful. In the process, I took a lot of notes about what things in the DTD Calculator application did or meant. I will try to share them to the best of my recollection here in the hopes of sharing knowledge and improving software. I'm probably going to go into a bit more detail than some care about, and I'm probably going to cover some topics that some people already know about, so please bear with me.


Also, it's entirely possible that I worry too much about stuff, or that I'm entirely wrong in some of my notes. If I've misunderstood something, please correct me.


I have a Mobile Intel 965 Express Chipset in a Dell Inspiron 1525 laptop that runs Windows Vista 32-bit. I have attached a Diagnostic Report from the graphic driver software package.
DiagnosticReport.txt 2k .txt file


My default Calculated DTD:
Code:
Code:
[CODE]DE 21 A0 70 50 84 1F 30 20 20 56 00 4B CF 10 00 00 18
[/CODE]
And attached is a photo of the interpretation of this DTD.
DTD Calculator - 01 Default DTD.png 63k .png file


First, was just understanding some of the values. Active Pixels/Lines? Blank Pixels/Lines? Start/End of Sync Pulse? End of Blanking Interval? Sync Offset? Sync Width? I needed some help.
http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/custom-resolutions-on-intel-graphics/


Okay, this was fairly simple.
Code:
Code:
[CODE]H Active Pixels
H Start of Sync Pulse = H Active Pixels + H Sync Offset
H End of Sync Pulse = H Start of Sync Pulse + H Sync Width
H End of Blanking Interval = H Active Pixels + H Blank Pixels

H Active Pixels = 1440
H Blank Pixels = 112
H Sync Offset = 32
H Sync Width = 32

H Start of Sync Pulse = 1440 + 32 = 1472
H End of Sync Pulse = 1472 + 32 = 1504
H End of Blanking Interval = 1440 + 112 = 1552

V Active Lines
V Start of Sync Pulse = V Active Lines + V Sync Offset
V End of Sync Pulse = V Start of Sync Pulse + V Sync Width
V End of Blanking Interval = V Active Lines + V Blank Lines

V Active Lines = 900
V Blank Lines = 31
V Sync Offset = 5
V Sync Width = 6

V Start of Sync Pulse = 900 + 5 = 905
V End of Sync Pulse = 905 + 6 = 911
V End of Blanking Interval = 900 + 31 = 931
[/CODE]
Or in some other terms:
Code:
Code:
[CODE]Right Picture Border = H Sync Offset = 32
H Sync Pulse = H Sync Width = 32
Left Picture Border = H Blank Pixels - (H Sync Offset + H Sync Width)
Left Picture Border = 112 - (32 + 32) = 112 - 64 = 48
H Total Pixels = H Active Pixels + Right Picture Border + H Sync Pulse + Left Picture Border
H Total Pixels = 1440 + 32 + 32 + 48 = 1552

Lower Picture Border = V Sync Offset = 5
V Sync Pulse = V Sync Width = 6
Upper Picture Border = V Blank Lines - (V Sync Offset + V Sync Width)
Upper Picture Border = 31 - (5 + 6) = 31 - 11 = 20
V Total Lines = V Active Lines + Lower Picture Border + V Sync Pulse + Upper Picture Border
V Total Lines = 900 + 5 + 6 + 20 = 931
[/CODE]


So where did the numbers come from? Thankfully, the application points most of this out for us, and with some help from a Wikipedia article on EDID I managed. I've color-coded the important parts, after that I ran out of easily distinguishable colors.
Code:
Code:
[CODE]00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 (Byte Reference Numbers)
DE 21 A0 70 50 84 1F 30 20 20 56 00 4B CF 10 00 00 18
[/CODE]
DE 21 A0 70 50 84 1F 30 20 20 56 00 4B CF 10 00 00 18

Byte 10 = 0x56 = (binary) 0101 0110

Byte 11 = 0x00 = (binary) 0000 0000
H Active Pixels = 0x5A0 = 1440

First Half (bits 7-4; first 4 bits from the left) of Byte 04 (5) and all of Byte 02 (A0)
H Blank Pixels = 0x070 = 112

Second Half (bits 3-0; last 4 bits from the left) of Byte 04 (0) and all of Byte 03 (70)
V Active Lines = 0x384 = 900

First Half (bits 7-4) of Byte 07 (3) and all of Byte 05 (84)
V Blank Lines = 0x01F = 31

Second Half (bits 3-0) of Byte 07 (0) and all of Byte 06 (1F)
H Sync Offset = 0x020 = 32

First Quarter (bits 7-6; first 2 bits from the left) of Byte 11 (0) and all of Byte 08 (20)
H Sync Width = 0x20 = 32

Second Quarter (bits 5-4; second set of 2 bits from the left) of Byte 11 (0) and all of Byte 09 (20)
V Sync Offset = 0x05 = 5

Third Quarter (bits 3-2; third set of 2 bits from the left) of Byte 11 (0) and the First Half (bits 7-4) of Byte 10 (5)
V Sync Width= 0x06 = 6

Fourth Quarter (bits 1-0; fourth set of 2 bits from the left) of Byte 11 (0) and the Second Half (bits 3-0) of Byte 10 (6)


The following parts I just have no idea what to do with, but here they are anyway:

H Image Size (mm) = 0x14B = 331

First Half (bits 7-4) of Byte 14 (1) and all of Byte 12 (4B)

V Image Size (mm) = 0x0CF = 207

Second Half (bits 3-0) of Byte 14 (0) and all of Byte 13 (CF)

H Border (each side in pixels) = 0

Byte 15 (00)

V Border (each side in pixels) = 0

Byte 16 (00)


Byte 17 is a bitmap, so it's full of stuff!

0x18 = 0001 1000

Bit 7, Interlaced: 0 (Off)

Bits 6-5, Stereo: 00 (No stereo)

Bits 4-3, Sync type: 11 (Digital separate)

Bit 2, if digital separate VSync polarity: 0 (negative)

Bit 1, Digital: HSync polarity: 0 (negative)

Bit 0, 2-way line-interleaved stereo, if bits 4–3 are not 00: 0


First problem, familiarization, solved!



Second, I was presented with two Pixel Clock values.
DTD Calculator - 02 Pixel Clock.png 66k .png file

One value is from the Hex value (0x21DE, or 8670), which is marked as being in "kHz", and the other value is calculated from that into MHz (86.7). The problem here is that 8670 kHz does not equal 86.7 MHz. 8670 kHz would be 8.67 MHz. So I did some digging.

http://www.mcamafia.de/mcapage0/timecalc.htm (Even though this reference seems to have been for an older CRT, the math still seems to be sound.)
http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/14828/how-do-i-calculate-needed-pixel-clock-frequency

Pixel Clock appears to be calculated like so:

Pixel Clock (Hz) = H Total Pixels * V Total Lines * Refresh rate in Hz

Per the information in DTD Calculator for my default DTD, that would be:

Pixel Clock (Hz) = 1552 * 931 * 60.0036542 Hz

Pixel Clock (Hz) = 86699999.9974304 Hz

Or 86.6999999974304 MHz, which is really close to the 86.7 MHz from the DTD Calculator. So what about that 8670 kHz value?


Well, 0x21DE in hexadecimal really does equal 8670. However, I saw this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_display_identification_data#EDID_1.3_data_format  
EDID Detailed Timing Descriptor

Bytes 0-1: Pixel clock in 10 kHz units. (0.01–655.35 MHz, little-endian)
In simple terms, "little-endian" means that the number is displayed in backward segments (least significant bits, such as those influencing the "ones column", are given first instead of last). So the Bytes 0-1 values of "DE 21" become "21 DE" or "0x21DE" when reading them normally.

However! The important part was this (emphasis mine), "Pixel clock in 10 kHz units". Ah-hah! The Pixel Clock in the DTD is given in 10 kHz units, not just single kHz units. So that means that 8670 10-kHz = 86700 kHz. 86700 kHz does indeed equal 86.7 MHz. It may be worth noting that the first Standard Timing included with the application, 1920x1080p @ 60Hz, illustrates this a bit more cleanly. Second problem, Pixel Clock, solved!


Related, it seems that the refresh rate gets calculated based off of the given Pixel Clock and Total Pixels (H Total Pixels * V Total Lines). Is there a reason it isn't the other way around (calculate Pixel Clock based on dimensions and a given Refresh Rate)?



So, having now a better understanding of this stuff, I sought to make a custom DTD for my computer to try to run games at lower resolutions (below 1440x900) but that remained at my monitor's native aspect ratio (16:10). I decided to try 960x600 for Active Resolution. My final worries were keeping the Pixel Clock, Refresh Rate, dimensions, and sync timings to something that my monitor could handle gracefully (I had read warnings that incorrect settings could damage monitors, so naturally I was a bit worried). I opted to try to keep the refresh rate at 60 Hz and the Pixel Clock to something that seemed in line with the Standard DTDs and my default DTD. I went about it, did some fiddling with the Blanking/Sync dimensions and Pixel Clock to ensure a refresh rate of 60 Hz, and came up with this using DTD Calculator:

60 18 C2 52 31 58 C8 20 62 5A 22 0F 4B CF 10 00 00 18


I had run the application as administrator. I added a custom DTD slot. I got the calculated DTD, and I wrote it to the registry. I can confirm that it is in the registry where it seems like it should be. I restarted, and the custom resolution did not show up. I thought it might be a banned resolution in the Video BIOS, so I tried to make one a few pixels off, saved, restarted, and still nothing. Maybe I'm just doing something... really wrong. Or I missed some really basic step somewhere.


I note that this thread has seen relatively little activity for a while, and that probably has something to do with the age of chipsets that benefit from this software. I thought I'd post anyway and see what happened. Hope some of the information is helpful to someone! Thank you to Archibael, Paul, and Wo0zy for their work!



P.S.: The link to instructions under the About tab in the application that points to http://isnwiki.jot.com/WikiHome/Articles/111111431 no longer works. Also, I apologize for the massive wall of text that this post became. It was originally just "Help! What did I do wrong?"
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I actually got this working, then immediately broke it.


I tried to connect an Intel 945GM to an ancient Mitsubishi WS 55511. The TV only accepted input from the laptop VGA as 5 cable component RGBHV


Tried VGA YPrPb 3 component but failed ( although it did work at 640x480 in the SD component inputs )


As to DTD Calculator, I noticed that each time I updated the system with a new resolution, the system started filling in other supported resolutions in the intel gfx options, lower resolutions dropping off the list as I added more - which were in fact differrent versions of 1080i.


Now that I have been thrashing away for a day or so I have lost the on 1080i that worked. I think it was the one from the standard menu, which gave me the option of 16-32bit 30-60Hz in the intel gfx options.


Just wondering if anyone can give me a tip to clear everything out and start over?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Well I found that if i delete all the DTD_1, 5's from the registry ( set them to zero actually) i can get back to a working 1080i by re-hacking with a single DTD defined


The thing I was trying to fix when I broke it was overscan - i have a laptop with a 1280x800 native LCD and i can only get the ruler/tuning to take account of that, not the Mitsubishi Obelisk...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
OK So the problem I had was setting the ruler on my HDTV, when my laptop refused to give up the primary display.


Well the intel gfx resolution tool, when i set the HDTV to be primary would switch it back after a few seconds. But I found the Windows 7 Screen resolution tool let me keep the HDTV as primary long enough to run the overscan ruler.


Now let's see if it worked....



....ho yus!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
I am at my wits end with my new build.


I upgraded from an old Athlon II x2 / AMD 880G build to a new Intel-based one (B75/i3-3225).


The system is connected to an old Loewe 38" CRT (480p, 1080i) via VGA. Previously, I could use Powerstrip to affect a resolution of 540p plus some tweaking to get the display just right. (1920x540= 1920, 44, 48, 192, 540, 2, 5, 15, 74184, 7)


Now I can't seem to get anything to work. I'm trying to use DTD Calc to force in 1080i and/or 540p. I can get 1080i to display but there is a 1-1.5" bar on the right side where the display does not extend to.


I would prefer to work in 540p but I haven't been able to get anything to display right. I tried to interpret the Powerstrip numbers into something DTDCalc could use, but got nothing usable (scanning issues).


Can anyone help with this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
Is there any support for this tool anymore? Sorry, I just don't want to waste time trying to use this tool if it's no longer supported.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
I'm trying to get my PC with Mobile Intel 4 Series graphics to output 480i via VGA. I tried a few different timings and none seemed to work: They all ended up just outputting the standard 480p (640x480 @60Hz).


Has anyone successfully used this tool to output 480i (640x480 @50Hz) or 480-RGB (640x480 @15Hz) with integrated Intel graphics?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Will this work with an Intel HD Graphics 4000 and an HDFury2 and a Toshiba 56H80 RPTV? For step 3a, I can't find the Intel Graphics Tray Information button in order to get my EDID data -- is this button still part of the 4000 control panel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckKahn  /t/947830/custom-resolution-tool-for-intel-graphics-easier-overscan-correction/1260#post_23175430


Will this work with an Intel HD Graphics 4000 and an HDFury2 and a Toshiba 56H80 RPTV? For step 3a, I can't find the Intel Graphics Tray Information button in order to get my EDID data -- is this button still part of the 4000 control panel?

Found the button in the updated blue and white control panel that comes with the 9.17.10.3071 driver. It is under Options / Information Center / Save -- it saves a text document with the the raw EDID data which when pasted back into the DTD field of the Reverse Calculation screen offers five DTDs, two of which are 1920x1080i.
Quote:
00 FF FF FF FF FF FF 00 21 6D 00 00 01 00 00 00

25 12 01 03 80 00 00 78 0A 0D C9 A0 57 47 98 27

12 48 4C 2D CB 00 81 80 81 8F 81 99 A9 40 45 59

61 59 81 40 81 59 01 1D 00 72 51 D0 1E 20 6E 28

55 00 C4 8E 21 00 00 1E 01 1D 80 18 71 1C 16 20

58 2C 25 00 C4 8E 21 00 00 9E 00 00 00 FC 00 48

44 66 75 72 79 32 0A 20 20 20 20 20 00 00 00 FD

00 17 A0 0F 79 11 00 0A 20 20 20 20 20 20 01 E2

02 03 47 75 5C 84 02 03 05 06 07 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 1F 20 01 0E 0F 1D 1E 0A 0B 19 1A 23 24 25

26 68 03 0C 00 14 00 80 21 00 38 09 7F 07 0F 7F

07 15 07 50 3E 1F C0 4D 02 00 57 06 00 67 54 00

5F 54 01 83 5F 00 00 8C 0A A0 14 51 F0 16 00 26

7C 43 00 13 8E 21 00 00 98 01 1D 00 BC 52 D0 1E

20 B8 28 55 40 C4 8E 21 00 00 1E 01 1D 80 D0 72

1C 16 20 10 2C 25 80 C4 8E 21 00 00 9E 00 00 FF

But all of the overscan corrections I added to the registry result in no picture -- my RPTV/HDfury2 combination seemed intolerant of any deviation from 1920 x 1080.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
COPY OF THE ORIGINAL INSTRUCTIONS?


I realize that this thread, and the original DTDCalc utility, are quite aged. In fact, I learned about this utility (and used it successfully) in 2008, when I got my first really big computer monitor! That monitor has recently bitten the dust; and thus, I am faced with using the utility again to try to accommodate the replacement monitor.


I still have the software; but unfortunately, I neglected to save Archibael's instructions anywhere! And as was pointed out above, the original link provided in the software for the instructions ( http://isnwiki.jot.com/WikiHome/Articles/111111431 ) no longer works.


Does anyone happen to have a copy of those instructions that they could post here? Or a new link to a copy of the instructions? Archibael or Wo0zy, if you are still around, maybe you could help out?


Thanks,

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by George Be  /t/947830/custom-resolution-tool-for-intel-graphics-easier-overscan-correction/1260#post_23607147


COPY OF THE ORIGINAL INSTRUCTIONS?


I realize that this thread, and the original DTDCalc utility, are quite aged. In fact, I learned about this utility (and used it successfully) in 2008, when I got my first really big computer monitor! That monitor has recently bitten the dust; and thus, I am faced with using the utility again to try to accommodate the replacement monitor.


I still have the software; but unfortunately, I neglected to save Archibael's instructions anywhere! And as was pointed out above, the original link provided in the software for the instructions ( http://isnwiki.jot.com/WikiHome/Articles/111111431 ) no longer works.


Does anyone happen to have a copy of those instructions that they could post here? Or a new link to a copy of the instructions? Archibael or Wo0zy, if you are still around, maybe you could help out?


Thanks,

George

The instructions are in the first post of this thread , aren't they? That's what they link to from the page where you can still download the software (which is the link to the clevertech website ).


Good luck,


Fred
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts

DTD Calc skips some registry entries

I checked whether the "Registry Hack" function of the DTDCalclator rewrites all DTD_1 values in the registry, but it doesn't: I have several HKLM/SYSTEM/ControlSetXXX and some were neglected by DTD Calc.

Maybe it causes no harm, or it should be patched in DTDCalc?
 
1261 - 1280 of 1293 Posts
Top