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Anyone know how to deal with Costoms when shipping a CRT to the UK? I would love to do it duty free, but I'm sure they have it set up so they get some money out of you.


Is there a form that I can download that will provide costoms with the information they need from me?


Can I claim this as a gift?


What about insurance is that different paperwork that costoms will never see?


Thanks, Deron.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by deronmoped
Anyone know how to deal with Costoms when shipping a CRT to the UK? I would love to do it duty free, but I'm sure they have it set up so they get some money out of you.


Is there a form that I can download that will provide costoms with the information they need from me?


Can I claim this as a gift?


What about insurance is that different paperwork that costoms will never see?


Thanks, Deron.
You don't pay the Customs duty on something you ship to the U.K., the person receiving it is responsible for the duty. Most freight forwarders have the form you fill out, you can probably even use the one from the USPS.


As for a gift, you can "claim" anything you want, but I wouldn't say that. Just declare a very low value because it's a used pj.
 

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The following is my understanding of the UK Customs & Excise system based upon experience. As with all this kind of advice, be aware that your mileage may vary etc, etc. The definitive word on HM Customs and Excise, plus most of the extra info you might need, can be found on their website, which is at:

www.hmce.gov.uk


As techman says, it is usually the person receiving the shipment who has to pay any duty on it (I think there is a tickbox on the shipping declaration form which makes this explicit). The duty is calculated by the UK shipping agent when the package arrives in the country, and is based upon the Customs Declaration that you fill in when you send the shipment, and which accompanies it en route. The recipient gets billed at the time of delivery i.e. they get your package accompanied by a bill for the duty, which is then supposed to be paid to the shipping agent, who then pay it Customs & Excise.


People shipping stuff to the UK should be aware that duty gets charged on the actual declared value of the item (not the insured or new value), and that this value INCLUDES the cost of the shipping.


If you are sending a used item that has been bought for USD 250.00 but which is insured for the new value of USD 1000.00, make sure the value on the declaration for Customs purposes is USD 250.00 (describing the item as being Used also helps). If you get this wrong, the recipient will have to chase C&E with all their receipts etc, to get the overpaid extra money back (they will need to pay the extra to get the package before they can make a claim). Look out for the separate space on the declaration for the insurance value which does not have to be the same as the item value.


Also if the item cost that has been paid includes the shipping expenses, make sure you separate these costs from the item value. The shipping costs are usually declared elsewhere on the form, and are added to the item value for the purposes of duty. Keep them separate, and the recipient will thank you for not having to pay duty on them twice!


Some companies doing business over the internet with buyers in the UK, allow the recipient to write their own Customs Declaration, in order to try and get the item through without paying duty, since it is almost always based upon this declaration. This is obviously illegal behaviour, and if caught the recipient could find themself liable for the duty on the item at list price value, plus I would imagine a possible fine. Most respectable sellers will of course refuse these kinds of practices.


You can send low value items as gifts, and I believe the cut off point for this is a maximum item value of GBP 36.00. Obviously if you send an 80 Kg projector in a flightcase with a declared item value below that, then people are going to start asking questions. Again the description of the contents on the declaration will help. Items that are described as secondhand or used, parts machines, or requiring repair, are obviously perceived as being less valuable than brand new items.


Final word of general advice - not all companies have tracking systems that allow you to follow an item once it has left the U.S. Try and pick one that does - it will make chasing down any problems much easier.


I am assuming here that you are sending from the U.S., as most of this is irrelevant for packages sent from inside the EEC, as they are not liable for duty upon entry to the UK.


Hope that helps


Daniel Clift
 
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